Archive for the ‘ideas’ Category

Stanza’s Object-Oriented Aesthetics By Charlie Gere

December 5th, 2013

Stanza’s Object-Oriented Aesthetics Charlie Gere

Stanza may be one of the most prolific and productive artists working today. For three decades he has been making work ‘about cities, landscape, surveillance space, and urbanism. These installations are often networked data experiences, fusing networks of live real time environmental data, live CCTV feeds, or live media visualisations’, as his website puts it.  Much if not most of his work over the last twenty five years has been concerned with the city and with real-time technologies of surveillance and information and has often involved using and even making electronic devices. What is particularly interesting about Stanza’s work is that he understands how to use in creative and novel ways a whole range of tools and technologies, which, along with his prodigious rate of production, means that his output is a kind of map of shifting technological realities and possibilities.

Meltdown_2004_.120-90

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

He groups many of his artworks over the last twenty five years under the rubric The Emergent City Projects. This goes back to work in the mid-1980s when he was making music videos about ‘cities, networks and urban situations’ using ‘VJ decks and experimental TV techniques’, and has continued to this day. Stanza’s prolific rate of production, and his continuous exploration of the possibilities and meanings of media and the environment make it almost impossible to track and map all his work, or even to gain an overview that would make it possible to grasp its totality. In this regard his work resembles the cities with which much of it is concerns, inasmuch as they too defy such a grasp.

Despite this, ‘Emergent City: From Complexity to the City of Bits’, the exhibition of Stanza’s work at the Waterman’s Centre in Brentford looks at first like a more or less conventional display of art. It occupies a white cube space, which is filled with both sculptural and painterly objects, as well as projections. Yet, unlike much conventional contemporary art, and in keeping with the complexity of Stanza’s work, it is oddly reticent inasmuch as it is hard to tell at first what is going on. Things are happening, both on the floor, and on the walls, but what they are is not immediately apparent. Far from being a problem I suggest that this opacity is the work’s great strength. Its very refusal of easy understanding is a profound reflection on the world itself, and the degree to which it is available to us.

Stanza’s art is consonant with a new philosophical position, or rather set of positions, that has recently emerged, that seeks to develop just such a complex understanding. There are a number of names associated with this, including Speculative Realism, Object-Oriented Ontology, and the New Materialism. Among its major figures are Quentin Meillassoux, Graham Harman, Levi Bryant, Ian Bogost, Jane Bennett, Vickie Kirby, and Timothy Morton, though it must be said that there are many others also working in the same are, and also that this is not to ascribe any overly unified character or set of beliefs to these thinkers. Nevertheless they offer a new way of thinking about the world, one that does not reduce it to what is available to human consciousness.

Art does not, indeed cannot tell us about things in the way that science or philosophy does, but it can tell us something about how we can come to know and understand the world into which we are flung. To put it another way it offers us an insight into the act of knowing and the way that that knowing is structured and determined. Works of art set us up us as observers of different sorts, according to the dominant epistemologies of the context in which they are made. Thus to look at a work of art made in a context different to that in which we find ourselves is to be given a potential insight, however partial, into a different way of thinking about and representing the world. Take, for example, the development of regimes of representation in painting in the West, from the Middle Ages to now. In the former period representation was organized according to a theocentric understanding of the cosmos, one that was coterminous with the dominant scholastic epistemology. Accordingly the visual regime of painting evinced a particular spatial arrangement, in which the size of those represented was structured in relation to their status within this divine economy.

Portraits Of The Artist Stanza

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the emergence of modernity, the disappearance of God as active participant in the world, and the concomitant rise of the human subject as source of knowledge, pictorial representation was ordered according to a different spatial logic, that of the viewpoint of such a subject, a static, monocular viewpoint, separate from that which is being observed. This form of representation was of a piece with the emerging understanding of the world from the perspective of the human subject, which found its most cogent expression in the work of Rene Descartes. Martin Jay goes so far as to describe the parallels between philosophical understanding and pictorial representation as ‘Albertian-Cartesian Perspectivalism’, acknowledging that Descartes’ thought was prefigured by the architect Alberti’s theories of how to represent the built environment. Perhaps the culmination of this kind of thinking was the Kantian division of the things of the world into noumena, the things as they are in themselves, and phenomena, the things as they are appear to us. For Kant our speculative reason can only know things as they appear to us, therefore the world can only be understood in terms dictated by its availability to human consciousness.

With the new understandings of the world brought about by Nietzsche, Freud, Bergson, Einstein and others in the late nineteenth and earlier twentieth centuries, new forms of representation emerged, including Impressionism, what came to be known as Post-impressionism, Cubism, DADA, Surrealism, and so on. With such movements new forms of seeing and knowing were enacted that took account of a more complex and fragmented universe than that supposedly available to the subject of modernity. This continued with the postwar avant-garde which engaged in a radical investigation into the very nature of representation, where and how it took place, and for whom it was intended. As such it paralleled philosophical movements such as Deconstruction which attempted the same for thought.

In the last thirty or so years it is arguable that art appears to have lost its sense of critical engagement with the world. Instead the imperatives of the market seem to be the determining factor in the production of art. But we cannot blame the failure of such work solely on the overly close relation between the art market and neoliberal late capitalism. There is a more complex issue at stake, which is the impossibility of reflecting on the world through purely visual means. Vision itself presupposes a certain subjectivity. To be able to capture the entire meaning of an artwork in the visual field is to be set up as an autonomous subject, capable of mastering what she sees. Yet, as theorists such as Fredric Jameson and Michel de Certeau pointed out many decades ago, the world is not amenable to such visual mastery. This is particularly true in our massively networked culture, in which the means by which power is wielded are largely concealed from us.

Jameson and de Certeau can be regarded as practicing a ‘hermeneutics of suspicion’, that critiqued modernist pretensions to visual and other forms of mastery. The moment in which they wrote the work cited above is often described as the beginnings of ‘postmodernism’, a crude term encompassing a wide variety of positions, but which can be seen as a general attempt to dismantle the edifice of philosophical modernity. As such it remained largely critical and even negative about that with which it engaged.nBy contrast the new philosophies mentioned above seek to go beyond this negativity. One idea that is shared by many of its proponents, that of a turn away from what has been named Kantian correlationism, the notion that the only world that is knowable is the one that is available to human consciousness. One of the consequences of this move has been an emphasis on the agency of non-human ‘actants’.

Perhaps the major figure in developing this line of thought is Bruno Latour, best known as a sociologist of science, but increasingly recognized as a philosopher for whom science offers a powerful set of exemplars of a more general understanding of the world. Latour was originally identified with the set of sociological methodologies known as Actor Network Theory (ANT). At the risk of oversimplification Latour’s dominating idea can be summed up as follows: nothing can be reduced to anything else. This does away with the modernist dualism in which a human subject stands apart from and stands over non-human objects. In Latour’s universe all entities have agency, and an equal say in how the world is and how it is understood. Latterly Latour has been taken up by thinkers connected with Speculative Realism, in particular Graham Harman, for whom Latour is the exemplary philosopher of post-correlationist thinking.

One of the crucial terms in Latour’s vocabulary is that of ‘black box’, a term originating in engineering to denote an element within a system whose effective working can be taken for granted, and therefore requires only input and output. For Latour the black box is the name for those elements within any set of theories about the world that we can take for granted. An example might be the structure of DNA as a double helix, something now almost entirely uncontested, and simply assumed in any discussions of genetics, but which once had to be argued for by assembling what Latour calls ‘allies’, both human and non-human, through which to defeat rival hypotheses.

stanza installation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This brings me back to Stanza and to the kind of art he practices, which I believe is the correlate of the philosophical ideas described above (without in any sense being illustrations of that work, or even evincing an awareness of it). This possibly reflects the fact that both the art and the philosophy emerge out of the same complex set of conditions, in particular the experience of living and working in a highly mediated ‘network society’, in which digital technology offers a powerful literal model of non-human, non-biological agency. It is worth noting that much of the discussion and debate in the philosophical circles described above bypasses traditional means of scholarly exchange, and takes place in the blogosphere. (Here it is important not to simplistically confuse or conflate digital networks with the actor networks talked about by Latour and others.)

That Stanza engages with the city as the main focus of his work is apt in this context, given that the urban environment can stand as a good model for the complex interactions and relations that thinkers such as Latour see as governing our world. Indeed Latour has written a small book, Paris: Ville Invisible, which makes this exact point. In this book Latour describes the highly interconnected and often hidden structures of the city of Paris, in order to demonstrate the degree to which what we see of a city is only a very small part of a far more complex situation.

Stanza might be understood to be doing something similar with his Watermans exhibition. The first work the visitor encounters is a screen showing a grid of live feeds from CCTV cameras across London. By showing a vanishingly small number of the multiple viewpoints available to the inhabitants of the city Stanza already allows to see how any panoptic view or unifying vision is impossible, and indeed that vision itself maybe almost entirely pointless as a means of understanding the city’s complexity. Turning round from this one is then confronted by a large installation occupying most of the gallery space, which is clearly the centre and focus of the exhibition. It is an accumulation of computer hardware arranged to look like a city. It is kinetic inasmuch as lights go on and off, and elements revolve at intervals. The spectacle is compelling in that what might at first just look like a model of a city exhibits some kind of autonomous activity that seems more than merely automatic. The various kinetic and light elements are in fact responding to Stanza’s own network of environmental sensors at his home and nearby. Relayed through the internet to a pair of Arduino microcontrollers the captured data determines the actions of those elements.

Stanza’s work not only performs the way in which non-human actants now appear to talk to each other, especially in relation to the so-called ‘internet of things’, but moreover how these conversations take place in literal black boxes, in other words the computers and networks whose operation is both largely hidden from us, and at the same time vital for our everyday existence. But this must not be seen merely as a comment on network technologies. Rather it should be understood as reflecting a more complex and widespread aspect of our existence, in short the degree to which we can now recognize that everything can and does communicate everything else. Much of this communication is not easily available to human subjects. Thus the opacity of Stanza’s and other new media work can be understood as the most profound artistic response to both our current mediated condition and to the new ontologies and philosophies it has engendered.

stanza sonicity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mark Cosgrove, director of programme at Watershed, the Bristol venue where Stanza has recently shown work, has claimed that ‘Stanza may well be the Picasso of the Internet’. This may be a little tongue-in-cheek, as well as an acknowledgement of Stanza’s protean workrate and capacity for experimentation within his chosen media, and indeed his technical virtuosity. But it also suggests something else, equally, if not more important. Picasso was perhaps the artist who first understood the implications of radical developments in science and philosophy at the beginning of the twentieth century, and found consonant forms of visual expression. Working at the end of the twentieth and the beginning of the twenty-first centuries, Stanza is developing an artistic language that can reflect the new ways of thinking about the world that are currently being proposed and debated.

Recently the term ‘The New Aesthetics’, coined originally by designer James Bridle, has been bandied about to describe the new aesthetic sensibility available via the artefacts of digital technology and computer visualization. Recently Ian Bogost, one of the leading exponents of Object Oriented Ontology, took the idea to task for not going far enough or being weird enough. Taking his cue from his book Alien Phenomenology, or what it’s like to be a thing, Bogost declares the need for an object-oriented aesthetics, and suggests that

A really new aesthetics might work differently: instead of concerning itself with the way we humans see our world differently when we begin to see it through and with computer media that themselves “see” the world in various ways, what if we asked how computers and bonobos and toaster pastries and Boeing 787 Dreamliners develop their own aesthetics. The perception and experience of other beings remains outside our grasp, yet available to speculation thanks to evidence that emanates from their withdrawn cores like radiation around the event horizon of a black hole. The aesthetics of other beings remain likewise inaccessible to knowledge, but not to speculation—even to art.

Stanza’s work may be seen as offering something of what Bogost proposes, an object-oriented aesthetics, that enables non-human actants to participate in the processes of representation and art making, and in doing so finds a means of expression that is adequate to our complex, interconnected world.

For me Stanza does not conform to the traditional idea of the artist as someone who operates at the level of human aesthetics. It is rather as if he had taken it upon himself to be a channel for the expanded range of aesthetic experiences available beyond the human sensorium, and find some modes of expression that can make those experiences available to us. There is a sense, looking at and hearing his work, of it being a vanishingly small representation of a far greater set of possibilities, and it is only his human finitude that limits his production. Looking at the work on his ‘Central City’ website is overwhelming, perhaps deliberately so. In the end it may be that the most meaningful and challenging aspect of Stanza’s art is not to be found in individual works, or even in their collective existence, but in their excessive and overwhelming profusion, which hints at the almost infinite range of other outcomes that might also be possible.

Though it is clearly important to reflect upon the malign uses of new technologies, such as their use in state surveillance, and a role for art in doing so, Stanza’s work offers something different, which I can only describe as a joyful and even celebratory engagement in the possibilities of these new media, and in their capacity to offer new aesthetic experiences. This does not of course mean that he avoids the complex questions concerning technology and the environment that his work attends to, but that there is also a space for a celebration of what such technologies make possible.

 

The British artist Stanza is keynote and chair at the Fascinate Conference Pervasive Media.

August 8th, 2013

The British artist Stanza is keynote and chair at the Fascinate Conference Pervasive Media. Stanza will be talking about networked connected space, big data, his work.

FASCINATE is an interdisciplinary conference investigating the current and future applications of ubiquitous computing technologies in visual and performance arts, architecture, craft, design and interactive media.

FASCINATE will explore technology, design and experience related to ubiquitous computing. Areas of interest include: ambient intelligence; experience design; cognitive environments; augmented performance; pervasive media and the internet of things.
FASCINATE will offer participants the opportunity to present and discuss their work, inspire and be inspired by the work of others across a range of fields of practice; build on the experience of keynote speakers and establish new and eclectic collaborations.
Stanza Portrait 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.fascinateconference.com/info/

FASCINATE 2013 : 28-30 August : Falmouth University – Cornwall – England

FASCINATE is an interdisciplinary conference investigating the current and future applications of ubiquitous computing technologies in visual and performance arts, architecture, craft, design and interactive media.

FASCINATE will explore technology, design and experience related to ubiquitous computing. Areas of interest include: ambient intelligence; experience design; cognitive environments; augmented performance; pervasive media and the internet of things.

http://www.fascinateconference.com/presenters/stanza/

Other keynotes from Atau Tanaka Ruairi Glynn Seth Honnor

stanza_may-183

URBAN AGE ELECTRIC CITY CONFERENCE REVIEW BY STANZA

December 10th, 2012

URBAN AGE  ELECTRIC CITY  CONFERENCE. A worldwide investigation into the future of cities. LONDON 6-7 DECEMBER 2012.

12.Stanza_cities_shanghai

I went along to this….

Maybe it was the venue, the Electric Light station but too many speakers acknowledged the venue as a landmark  site and rooted themselves in anecdotal reflection while failing to jump into speculative imaginings of a smart, connected, intelligent city which is what I was hoping for.

The conference started at a tangent when  it was side tracked / hi jacked  by the political with the PM David Cameron and Mayor Boris Johnson announcing a new initiative showing to a crowded room of designers and architects how a 50 million pound building that would be sited on a roundabout would be the centre of a new technological age.

From Craig Calhoun onwards the word infrastructure was the default position or reference point and maybe quite rightly. As an observation even cities without any notable infrastructure seem to have and behave like cities. Cities are systems. Rem Koolhaas observed and documented this lucidly several years back in his film about Lagos.

The smart city will be a system that is designed or at least implemented and to evaluate  this  two things were missing:-  real world examples and speculative  approaches with answers. The conference needed to find the new questions revolving around not only the climate based  issue and new migrations but also  this issue of the control space and the new virtual borders. Richard Sennet was wrong to suggest this technology (ref fibre optics etc) is too expensive for people to have in their own homes. I have two wireless sensor networks that I have developed and it hasn’t stopped me commenting and taking apart. Individual will drives political change.

Cities change rapidly because of events. These can be anything from acts of god, to events in other systems that cause change through initial unpredictable behaviour. Deyan Sudjic, Director, Design Museum referenced the shipping container. It caused mass changes in labour markets and intitated globalisation. Ten years after the container was invented thousands of dockers had lost their jobs. The process of a city butterfly effect has knock on consequences.

Saskia Sassen, brought in another anecdote about gentrification of poor urban areas which led to a revival of the space and local park because dog owners where forced to walk their dogs in the park thus reviving local and public space; thus demonstrating causal effect on the organic system of the city.

And as much as Richard Sennet argues for the horizontal against the vertical, I would speculate that lines don’t matter anymore in the smart city as everything can be reduced by closeness to in the virtual world to being next to one another. In the smart city everything is compressed. The network system can ignore both the horizontal and the vertical and just make the connection. One doesn’t need to travel up or along but through space.

Adam Greenfield remarked that the city is controlled from above. From Gods eye to the electronic eye the world has always been controlled from above except now we have all become Gods eye. Since we can acknowledge this the Electric City missed an opportunity to  offer new  perspectives on how the legal profession will deal with this very new multi point perspective that is now available to all. “Order might start from below” as Jane Jacobs noted  but control is now in the heavens. The new  technologies which I call the mother of big  brother  will oversee all battles that get played out in out future cites and will act on them as purposed. The question therefore is how do we re-purpose the technology?

A point which Wolfgang Pietsch, Munich Center for Technology in Society alluded to. He said increased experimentation leads to more control. IE social; forecasting and predictive modelling and visualisation might be part of the problem.

Carlo Ratti, Director, MIT Senseable City Lab  pointed to a few of his examples where sensing and actuators can allows something to ” start to speak ” and found that accidents in the machine can illustrate ways forward. However people always find a way, and generally it’s that of least resistance. Erik Spiekermann noted that like sheep we will take or own route forcing the design to change for us.

The focus also came back to politics on day two with Anthony Giddens, whose brilliant keynote hi jacked the whole agenda focusing the audience into a reality of risk based around the political will and agency of the climate change problem.

Which was illuminated by the quote of the conference from Tessa Jowell, Member of Parliament, UK; “trust it’s too high to aspire to”.

And in that one short statement she hi-lighted an inflexibility in the system. Trust is imperative in everything we do, it is something everyone should aspire to, and a politician who cannot aspire to be trusted cannot by default be trusted.  The generation that cannot aspire to be trusted needs to get out the way. No politics is better that un-trusted politics. All system will find a path, all dogs need to be walked, all cites change and evolve. Out future and the future of the smart city is based on trust, both in the technology that it can serve us all and the trust that if we work together and share knowledge it will be for a better city.

Anthony Giddens, hi-lighted the importance of the moment we are now in and stressed its significance. We live in an age of high risk but great opportunity.

Stanza dec 2012

 

 

 

Stanza: Can we use new technologies to imagine a world where we are liberated and empowered. An interview between Stanza and Rob van Kranenburg of the Internet Of Things

May 3rd, 2012

An interview between Stanza and Rob van Kranenburg of the Internet Of Things

RvK: Stanza, you were among the first internet artists. What would you say is the most important philosophical step (if we can think in terms of ‘progress’, or ‘going somewhere’) that you have taken in this period? “In the last twenty years there has been a significant shift in audio visual artists’ practise from linear expressions, to interactive (user controlled) mediations, to generative (evolving) and then network-based (real time) systems. Online, this space  also expands the whole notion of the artist’s studio.  My focus is on the things that change, the flow, the data that describes our experience of the city as space. Data from all sides in systems that can be mediated by all, with varying visualizations communicated over the internet and represented onto different display systems.

There are many theoretical aspects to my work, but primarily I am a practice-based artist……in other words I make stuff.

My work has covered experiments in these areas and traced a shift in practise from modernist approaches of asset gathering (linear construction) to arrangements of datasets in fixed lists or databases (interactivity) to new approaches of mining information across networks in real time.( generative and real time systems)……culling data off CCTV networks, making visualizations of cities from my wireless sensor networks.”

RvK: How do feel about the current actualizations of the ‘in between’ space that you felt, saw or heard coming some time ago?

“I believe there is a new social space that exists in between these independent networks. Future cities will be merged into real time connected up data cities.  A connection of networks of real time information flows. The results created will lead mashed up cities and real time performative city experiences.  This conclusion although led from my earlier trails using wireless sensors in a project called Sensity.

I am interested in how this shared data space can overlap creating a new space in between which only two nodes or spaces share. For example in one of my artistic experiments I have  merged collected data from various real time cities to visualise this new space, the space where the cities overlap and which allude to a new architectural and urban virtual space. Uses of such information might allow rich new interpretative visualisations about the way our world is built, used, and designed.

The resulting artworks represent the real time conditions of the city.  Works like “Sensity”, create real time interpretations of social spaces that inform the world (online), and hopefully create new meaningful experiences allowing critical reflection on the real time city and the social political undercurrent embedded in the search for the real time city.

This might also allow for a greater community of interpreters and beneficiaries to see, and to come to their own understandings arising from this data about our socially-networked environment.  (as the data in these projects is open via XML)

Underpinning these artworks and research, are a whole series of potential problems about observation, surveillance, and the ethics of the control space.  Imagine walking out the door, and knowing every single action, movement, sound, micro movement, pulse, and thread of information is being tracked, monitored, stored, analyzed, interpreted and logged.

The world we will live in seems to be a much bigger brother than the Orwellian vision, it’s the mother of big brother.

Can we use new technologies to imagine a world where we are liberated and empowered, where finally all of the technology becomes more than gimmick and starts to actually work for us or are these technologies going to control up, separate us, divide us, create more borders. Will the securitization of city space create digital borders that monitor our movement and charge us for our own micro movements inside the system?”

RvK: The data is the medium, you state. Can you explain this a little bit?

“Just  that… the data is the medium of the age….”

RVK: Can you find connections to the FB generation? Do you want to?

“It has a useful API as do all these new big sites; however there are restrictions entering the domains and boundaries of others especially when they  try to cross over and get monitised.”

RvK: The key  (or one of the keys) is  the granularity of input for these ‘smart’ systems. How do you see this?

“Yes, small unit blocks, simplified then re built , re-cored re-formed into an understanding that can re-communicate the complexity of the larger system. Strip the city down and re- configure it as a real-time visualization and plug it into other cities.”

The art of gathering data Sesnors in the city

The art of gathering data. Sensors  in the city

RvK: Your work is filled with wonder? Do you feel that this wonder is facilitated somehow in what is now termed Internet of Things?

“I have tried to encompass this “wonder” about real time connectivity and networked space  in my  latest three works, they are about the “internet of things”, but equally  they  are about real  time experiences of the environment and the spaces that change around us.”

Issues In Science And Technology, Spring 2012. Dear Hillary Rodman Clinton

April 13th, 2012

For those of you who know me well, you might find this quite funny. I was recently asked to for twelve images for a US based magazine who said they wanted to do a feature on Stanza. I thought why not, so I prepared the images 300 dpi for the editor as requested and sent them off. A couple of weeks later with a 44 dollar stamp they sent me four copies, very kind. (Most journalists don’t event bother)

Stanza Sensity

Stanza Sensity

Anyway its always nice to see your artworks in print over breakfast and they did look nice. Twelve images of “Sensity”, the live city data art project in the magazine Issues In Science And Technology, Spring 2012. However on first glance I couldn’t believe it they had used my images it seemingly to illustrate a text that wasn’t about me or by me. Off I steamed…. this editor needs an email.

Anyway before I  shot myself in the foot, I thought I better give it a read. The article is  on “Internet Freedom and Human Rights”,  just my thing, I wonder who wrote it……err

Dear Hillary Rodman Clinton thanks for using my artworks in your essay…. …

I got another coffee together and gave it a proper read, it’s not bad actually.  “the more people online contributing ideas,  the more valuable the network becomes to all the other users”………

“If we are not careful, governments could upend the current Interent governance in a quest to increase their own control….”…The last point rather timely since the UK are about do just that.

Stanza Sensors On Google Maps

Stanza Sensors On Google Maps

(http://www.stanza.co.uk/sensity/index.html)

Artworks using data and the artists DNA sequence. By Stanza

February 22nd, 2012

Genomixer DNA artworks By Stanza

Artworks using the atists DNA

stanza_dna_lifeforms

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Genomixer ….a database of dna code. A completely new online experience.

A series of online artworks inspired by the human genome sequence and developed from dna profile which are sequenced from the artists blood. The online artworks are investigations into genetic codes mapped and re assembled online. The artwork series enables a cross reference all the code on the genome sequence allowing you to intermix or breed your own variable of me; you can look at the new mix of chromosomes in real time; on line.

 

To make these works my dna was sampled to make metaphases, g-banding and full profiles of chromosomes. Samples of my dna currently resides in my freezer ready for cloning. Works are enabled by dna code extracted from my blood. The sounds and images of code make audio visual self portrait versions.

Artworks using the atists DNA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

stanza dna metaphase painting 2002

stanza dna metaphase painting 2002

It seems likely with the advent of self dna tests the emergence of this type of DNA test will be prolific. This data can be recorded into the genomixer database and saved. That is, each independent user will have there own personal online audio visual experience based on there unique genetic code and becuase they have the option to save it this means they can also see and listen to other users results. In other words this is a giant open source audio visual labyrinth and database. The system uses a generative audio system that can play interactive non linear audio over the net. The sounds are mapped to the genetic codes. Genomixer is a complete audio visual online generative system. Code representing code generated by code made from blood.

Genomixer ….a database of dna code.

Stanza Data Artwork called Sonicity exhibited at 25th Stuttgarter Filmwinter

February 12th, 2012

Stanza  Data Artwork called Sonicity exhibited at 25th Stuttgarter Filmwinter

Smart cities and real data

Stanza Smart cities and real data

Sonicity Installation is exhbited in Germnay  for Stuttgarter Filmwinter Sound Installation, Great Britain 2011.

“Sonicity” is a responsive installation, a sonification of the real space and environment. This artwork focuses on the real time space and the experience of the gallery visitor as they interact with the space, using data gathered from these new technologies. My system monitors the space (the building) and the environment (the city) and captures live real time data (light, temperature, noise, humidity, position) to create an ambient sonification, an acoustic responsive environment, literally the sound of the micro incidents of change that occur over time. This artwork explores new ways of thinking about interaction within public space and how this affects the socialization of space. The project uses environmental monitoring technologies and security based technologies, to question audience experiences of the event and space and gather data inside the space. The project also focuses on the micro-incidents of change, the vibrations and sounds of the gallery using wireless sensor based technologies.

Stanza Sonicity Artwork

Stanza Sonicity Artwork

The sounds you hear are the sounds of the changing environment, i.e. the changes of noise, light, temperature of the space is turned into a real time sound stream using dozens of wireless sensors presented as an installation on 170 speakers.

Soundinstallation, Großbritannien 2011

“Sonicity” ist eine reaktionsfähige Installation, ein Hörbarmachen von realem Raum und realem Umfeld. Die Klänge, die man hört, sind die einer sich verändernden Umwelt, das heißt Veränderungen von Geräuschen, Licht und Temperatur werden mithilfe dutzender kabelloser Sensoren in einen Echtzeit-Soundstream umgewandelt und als Installation aus 170 Lautsprechern präsentiert.

Die Arbeit konzentriert sich auf den Echtzeit-Raum und die Erlebnisse der Besucher wenn sie mit dem Raum interagieren. Dabei werden Daten, die durch diese neuen Technologien gesammelt wurden, verwendet. Mein System überwacht den Raum (das Gebäude) und die Umwelt (die Stadt) und erfasst live die Echtzeit-Daten (Licht, Temperatur, Geräusche, Luftfeuchtigkeit, Position) um die Umgebung in Form von Tönen abzubilden, eine auf Akustik reagierende Umgebung, buchstäblich der Sound der Mikro-Veränderungen, die sich im Lauf der Zeit ereignen. Das Kunstwerk untersucht neue Denkansätze über Interaktion im öffentlichen Raum und wie sich diese auf die Sozialisation des Raums auswirkt.

Das Projekt nutzt Umweltüberwachungstechnologie und Sicherheitstechnik, um die Besuchererlebnisse im Raum zu hinterfragen, wobei Daten im Raum gesammelt werden. Das Projekt beleuchtet auch die Mikro-Veränderungen, die Vibrationen und Geräusche der Ausstellungsräume mit drahtloser, sensorenbasierter Technik.

Artists Talk By Stanza At QUAD Gallery Derby

January 22nd, 2012

Artists Talk Stanza:

Portrait Of Artist Stanza In LA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday 11th February 5.00 – 6.30pm in the Box

Stanza will be presenting the development of technology and its role within the arts over the last 15 years, introducing us to a number of his legendary and iconic artworks alongside the history and context of digital audio visual art.

Stanza generative artwork 2005

Stanza generative artwork 2005

Stanza interviewed for Leonardo Almanac New Media Exhibition Re-Drawing Boundaries

June 12th, 2011

Stanza interviewed for Leonardo Almanac

LEA New Media Exhibition. Re-Drawing Boundaries. Focus On: Stanza
Curator: Jeremy Hight

Stanza interviewed for Leonardo Almanac New Media Exhibition Re-Drawing Boundaries

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Senior Curators: Lanfranco Aceti and Christiane Paul

There is an interview here between Stanza and Jeremy Hight for this LEA New Media Exhibition.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do not reproduce this image without my consent….


Artworks by Stanza about Surveillance art and privacy.

June 9th, 2011

Artworks by Stanza that in some way deal with surveillance and privacy.

Over the last ten years I have a made of  twenty artworks and large installations that survey my interest in privacy , control space, and surveillance. This also  overlap with my interest in cities, environmental monitoring and the building as display space. It seems to make a nice online exhibition. ( see below)

Main artworks using CCTV surveillance and notion of control space.

stanza_art_installation

Urban Generation; trying to imagine the world from everyone elses perspective, all at once 2002. Multiple CCTV cameras are accessed randomly in real time to make an urban tapestry. What you see is an evolving, generative artwork. These images are from taken London, and they happen as you see them, in real time. The installation versions of this work can be presented in art galleries using projectors or plasma displays. http://www.stanza.co.uk/urban_tapestry/index.html

Baa Ram Ewe…to your clan be true. 2008 This artwork performance focuses on local environmental concerns using ad hoc wireless networked devices for environmental monitoring. In this case the dozen sheep collect and send data about the environment, and respond to the space as a collective as they move about. The sheep monitor the environment in real time, generate sound, and send data to a server (online or offline) where this data is interpreted  visualized and sonified in situ using custom made software. http://www.stanza.co.uk/sheep/index.html

Public  Domain 2010. This project investigates the real time gallery space and the experience of the gallery visitor as they interact with artworks and with each other. The artwork explores new ways of thinking about interaction within public space using data gathered from new technologies. The visitors are “performers” whose movements can be tracked.  The patterns, movement, and exchanges of data in the real space, can be measured and interpreted as an emergent social space and used to make new artworks.  http://www.stanza.co.uk/public_domain_outside/index.html

“Visitors to a Gallery- referential self, embedded”. 2008 The gallery surveillance system embeds the visitors to the gallery inside the artwork. CCTV in public spaces. This artwork uses the live CCTV system inside an art gallery or any public space to create a responsive mediated architecture. Custom made electronics and sonar sensors are placed to create an installation in the gallery space. Visitors to the main upper gallery control the CCTV feeds by their own movement in the space. The piece becomes a semi performative controlled system. The proximity to the main ultrasound sensors affects the aesthetic of the image. http://www.stanza.co.uk/cctv_web/index.html

Public Domain 2005. Is an artwork using live CCTV cameras given away to members of the public. The project places real time CCTV feeds online, creating a randomised narrative of the city landscape and its population. The images are grabbed and placed online and mixed in a unique and custom built software surveillance suite. This first version used ten cameras in Nottingham in 2005. http://www.stanza.co.uk/publicdomain/index.html

Sonicity. 2010. This artwork explores new ways of thinking about interaction within public space and how this affects the socialization of space. The project uses environmental monitoring technologies and security based technologies, to question audiences experiences of the event and space and gather data inside the space. The project also focuses on the micro-incidents of change, the vibrations and sounds of the gallery using wireless sensor based technologies. http://www.stanza.co.uk/sonicity/index.html

Capacities. 2010. This project leverages the real time gallery space and the experience of the gallery visitor, using data gathered using these new technologies. The objective is to explore new ways of thinking about interaction within public space and how this affects the socialization of space. The project uses environmental monitoring technologies and security based technologies, to question audiences experiences of the event and space and gather data inside the space. http://www.stanza.co.uk/capacities/index.html

Public Domain: III. 2010. Continuing the series of investigations into the uses of CCTV to extend space and invoke impressions of transparency with architectural space. Here to extend the architecture of the building and extend it into the city. The artwork includes the performative aspect of those being watched as can be displayed inside the work. http://www.stanza.co.uk/CCTV_publicdomain/index.html

Stanza Artwork Live CCTYV

Stanza Artwork Live CCTYV

DATA DATA DATA  II. 2010 Made from the data that is collected from the sensors (usually across the city) or inside a building or a gallery. I have two networks of sensors which collect this data, all this is then published online. This is an art project that gives information about the fabric of our cities. By embedding the sensors like this we can re-engage with the urban fabric.  http://www.stanza.co.uk/data/index.html

“We have nothing to hide only to lose”. 2010 A performative piece using CCTV systems. The CCTV follows the artist around the building in the depths of the night and the result is projected outside in the city. http://www.stanza.co.uk/CCTV_performance/index.html

Stars of CCTV.  2007

These are the Stars of CCTV.  These images represent a portrait of England since the start of the CCTV imaging revolution.This image represented the start of the CCTV revolution. Since then we have seen CCTV cameras placed all over the United Kingdom for our “safety”, without any real debate about the ethic and accountability of surveillance in public domain space.

http://www.stanza.co.uk/stars_of_cctv/index.html

YOU ARE MY SUBJECTS. 2005. This online networked artwork uses live real time data from a camera in NYC . What you are seeing on the screen is happening in New York as you see it in real time.  Someone is always watching you in a world of total surveillance culture. This artwork deals with the aesthetics of CCTV and the voyeuristic notion of who controls the data and who has access to the data. Millions of hours of CCTV are watched in private in closed off networks. “You Are My Subjects”, turns CCTV images into artworks. http://www.stanza.co.uk/i_spy/index.htm

The World Is Watching, The World is Waiting. 2005 This artwork is networked, its real time, and its taking images in the present and representing them to you online as a media visualisation of the whole world. The software system uses over five hundred cameras are take the information and arranges the present time in a continuous flow.http://www.stanza.co.uk/watching_world/index.html

Stanza: CCTV  Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Stanza: CCTV Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Timescapes 2004 -5.

Artworks from live media visualisations. Most of these are now large original artworks on canvas available for sale and exhibition. These images or mediascape are made from my software system that gathers images live from any webcam in the world. At your descretion it cuts them up them up to make time shift mediated artworks.

Artworks by Stanza

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.stanza.co.uk/timescapes_web/Public_Domain_Event_Space/index.html

http://www.stanza.co.uk/timescraper/index.html

‘america is bleeding’ – 2005 The computer manipulates the real time experiences and life of NYC as it unfolds. The city and its population are all actors in this real time play. Keywords: Visualisation, data, mediascape, net art, real time, CCTV, http://www.stanza.co.uk/new_york_stories/index.html

 

Syncronicity By Stanza

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Urban Rhythms. Searching for the soul of the city. 2004 A networked real time experience of a city. The artwork collects cctv feeds from around city in real time. These real time images are fed into a software system where a series of specialized channels rework these images. The channels are always on, and always changing, a constant view of world cities changing and evolving around the clock. http://www.stanza.co.uk/spain_cctv/index.html

“Global…Never the same again always different….forever.”2004. A 3d web sculpture being transformed in real time with live data from around the world. This is being updated from webcams around the globe in real time. ‘Never the same again always different….Forever’, uses CCTV and web cams which offer readily available sources of continuous visual data from our environment and world cities. This work turns the notion of surveillance upside down, since in this work we are all watching everybody and opens up a question about the legality of the imagery. http://www.stanza.co.uk/global/index.htm

‘Blue Skies’, 2005 Uses CCTV cameras on the roof of the Watershed Media Centre in Bristol England. This is an online surveillance system using three cameras to monitor the sky above. Blue skies acts as a metaphor using new networked technologies that are generally used to observe people in society that might be engaged in criminal activity. http://www.stanza.co.uk/blue_skies/index.html

“The World Turned Upside Down”: 2007 This artwork was online from 24.9.2007 until the leaves fell in my garden on 12.12.2007.After that only documentation will exist, which is below.  This artwork is available as an installation for exhibitions.  http://www.stanza.co.uk/cam/trees_web/index.html

Seeing Through Walls. 2007. This installation using CCTV to open up the space to  play tricks and to  see through walls Commission idea for the Olympics 2012. This installation uses CCTV to open up the space to play tricks and to see through walls. http://www.stanza.co.uk/fake/index.html

“Monument” 2007. Robotic sculpture and CCTV systems to replace Eros in Picadilly London.The CCTV captured get replayed onto all the giant screens all over London. The robotic arms move and the CCTV cameras come down and say hello. They capture your image and relay the image to banks of screens across the city and online. http://www.stanza.co.uk/monumnent/index.html

DATA DATA DATA by Stanza 2008. This artwork is networked, its real time, and its takes data from a wireless sensor network that is placed in the real space. The old world of modernism was a world of fluids and gases atoms and molecules. This world is now a world of numbers. As we move about our interactivity affects the environment and this change is captured by a wireless sensor network. Real time artwork.  Technical note this can work in a gallery ( online over the internet) to represent the space (gallery or city) as numbers. http://www.stanza.co.uk/datacity/index.html

Soul 2004 -06. Soul is an artwork created to represent the ‘soul’ of the city that captures live data and visualizes the results as a piece of sculpture in a constantly evolving data sculpture. It is presented on a unique display technology, this is a 3 meter globe. Soul is a site specific work placed in urban space.The results of the installation are also viewable to a global audience as an online networked generative experience. Real time images are fed into a software system where a series of specialized channels rework these images to create unique visuals. The channels are always on, and always changing, a constant view evolving around the clock. The data is never the same, it is always changing. http://www.stanza.co.uk/soul_globe/index.html

“This England: A Green and Pleasant Land”, 2005. These pastoral landscapes and seascapes are real time paintings. Instead of CCTV watching our movement in urban space these cameras point out to the landscape or towards the sea. Typically this subject matter was the focus of the ‘Old Masters’. The digital landscape is fused with an ever changing present. http://www.stanza.co.uk/thisengland/index.html

Alpha to Omega 2006. Gathering images live from any webcam in the world that happens to be pointed or focused at the weather. The images are updating from around the globe in real time. http://www.stanza.co.uk/weather_another/index.html

Syncronicity 2008. This work developed out of my research fellowship at goldsmiths college.This is a live visualisation of a hand drawn city. Dozens of hand drawings are being walk on by small robots. The real space made as a visualisation. A special camera system, makes these digital images in the gallery space. Prototype was tested in Plymouth arts centre 2008. http://www.stanza.co.uk/syncronicity/index.html

 

FREEZONE 2005 Is a unique global company offering short holidays.  All bio chips, ID cards, GPS, will be neutralized at the door for the duration of the stay. Obviously “they” will know you are in Feezone, but what you do is up to you. FREEZONE The global “mother of big brother” will create a giant sensor net. The virtual world of databases will be connected via our electronic gadgetry. The giant sensor net of embedded chips, CCTV, bio tech and the internet will all be available to all via Earth pro version 10.2.  http://www.stanza.co.uk/ideasrus/freezone.html

Artworks by Stanza

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Publicity. 2004 Publicity is an artwork about the Surveillance of public domain space utilzing the CCTV systems in place and manipulating the CCTV feeds. A series of codes manipulates the CCTV of the building and created a new relationship with public domain space. This artworks questions who owns the data and who is watching us in these spaces. Most buildings have CCTV and they use it to observe the people inside the space, ie the public. http://www.stanza.co.uk/publicity/index.html

Stanza making things that occupy space.

November 30th, 2010

Much if not most of his work over the last twenty five years has been concerned with the city and with real-time technologies of surveillance and information and has often involved using and even making electronic devices.  In 2009 he did a residency at Lanternhouse in Cumbria,  near to the Lake District,  in which he applied some of the same techniques as he has used in relation to city life to more rural contexts. Yet this bucolic interlude was an exception to the normal location of his artistic practice.

Yet I would like to claim that Stanza presents an exemplary form of art as craft, in the sense that he takes the materials of our current technologised culture and materially engages with their possibilities in order to reflect upon what it means to be living in that culture. What is particularly interesting about Stanza’s work is that he understands how to use in creative and novel ways a whole range of tools and technologies, which, along with his prodigious rate of production, means that his output is a kind of map of shifting technological realities and possibilities. He groups many of his artworks over the last twenty five years under the rubric The Emergent City Projects.

stanza_music-_performance

Image: Stanza Music Performance with touchscreens: 2004

Stanza artwork above 2004

In the mid-1980s he was making music videos about ‘cities, networks and urban situations’ using ‘VJ decks and experimental TV techniques’.  In 1989 he started a series of monochrome paintings of cityscapes, based on his own photographs, entitled Control… In 1997 he started Central City…….

In a situation where the virtual realm becomes more and more the place where we, in the so-called developed world at least, work and socialise, the material, lived environment of the city becomes a locus of greater authenticity, much as the rural landscape did during the period of industrialisation. Yet, much as representations of the countryside in the 19th century were often made with much more awareness of the social and ecological issues than we now imagine,

Stanza’s work does not romanticise the city. He portrays it as a complex, informational space, networked by different complex systems, some visible and some invisible. He also makes the work in the most direct sense; he is a maker, a craftsperson, who knows how to program, how to use live video feed, and how to build robots, and sensing devices.

Above all he knows how to use and to work with the technologies of real-time computing and visualisation that have become an increasingly important part of our technologised culture.

To a certain extent Stanza’s practice and that of others like him, embodies the idea of ‘immaterial labour’ and the ‘social worker’ as discussed by, among others, Antonio Negri and Michael Hardt.

In the context of a capitalism increasingly dominated by information technology Hardt and Negri distinguish between two forms of the ‘immaterial labor of analytical and symbolic tasks’, on one hand ‘routine symbolic tasks’, and ‘creative and intelligent manipulation’ on the other (293). They claim that, inasmuch as such labour necessarily involves cooperation prior to its subsumption by capital, it seems to ‘provide the potential for a kind of spontaneous and elementary communism’ (294). Hardt and Negri have been widely criticised for the naivety of this statement. What might be claimed is that immaterial labour does offer a new model of craft production as opposed to the dehumanising mass production of industrial capitalism.It seems to me that the work of Stanza offers us a model of not just an artistic but also an ethical engagement with technology, at a time when such a thing is, I believe, increasingly needed. His work does not comment on, for example, surveillance technologies or sensing technologies, or other public manifestations, in a political or polemic manner. Rather it engages in what they might be for, how they might be used, in ways that explore their meaning and potential beyond the obvious kinds of use. As such he works against the cool aesthetic of much work made with such technologies.

By contrast with the reticent of such stuff, Stanza produces an abundance of vivid, complex, often baroque work that is unashamedly aesthetic in the sense of being concerned with the sensually beautiful. In this he is like Ruskin’s gothic builder, whose love of variety and for beauty for its own sake was, for Ruskin, evidence of his freedom, as compared to the ‘enslaved’ worker, endeavouring to produce regular perfection. The modern equivalent to such an enslaved worker might be an artist committed to a conceptual programme of work as much as it might be a computer programmer endeavouring to find the most economical and ‘elegant’ solution to a logical problem. That said Richard Sennett’s book on The Craftsman explicitly claims that programming can be a craft and offers the example of Linux programmers.

stanza artist

Image: Detail from live CCTV software system by Stanza 2005.

Stanza artwork above 2005

The difference between Stanza and the Gothic craftsman discussed by Ruskin is that the latter works spatially, making things that occupy space and endure, unchanged over time.

Stanza works in time, in the sense that he manipulates real-time and time-based  technologies such as CCTV cameras.  He does not so much ‘sculpt time’ as Andrei Tarkovski described the process of film making, as ‘craft time’. In the context of a culture in which time has increasingly become a commodity, this crafting of time takes on a more pressing and even political dimension.

Charlie Gere

Head of Department

Institute for Cultural Research

RESPONSIVE ARCHITECURE FACADE – DATACITIES

June 18th, 2010
stanza_artist_sidefacade_new2

Stanza . Responsive architecture. 2010. AOF Facade Norway.

This proposal has won the Nova Folkets Hus facade international juried competition and is now in development. The facade becomes a live dynamic interface, an artwork that changes its behavior as a result of the changing condition in the environment. This works by sensing the city and the environment to make art. The results become representations of the real time spaces and environment of Trondheim.

Environmental data is collected across the urban and environment infrastructure to make the artwork; using custom made sensors in the building and around the city. (30 custom environmental sensors units measure, light, noise, sound, humidity, and temperature). This data is turned into a online real time visualization of the space. The sensors interpret the micro-data of the interactive city. The output from the sensors display the real time environmental and emotional state of the city online in real time and the information will be used on the façade and online interface to control it.

My environmental sensors are scattered all over the building and city; this means I am literally painting with live data.

Stanza Live City Data

Artwork sensors in the building and around the city. Stanza 2010.

LISTENING IN THE CITY. SOUNDCITIES SOUNDMAPS.

November 23rd, 2009

SOUND ECOLOGIES: LISTENING IN THE CITY.

Stanza is  presenting some new ideas and works….about sounds in the city.

10am-4pm, Wednesday 18th November 2009
Department of Music, City University London, Northampton Square, London EC1V 0HB

A day of presentations, participatory workshops and informal performance around themes of urban sound, networked sound, locative media and acoustic ecology – the relationship between living beings their environment, as mediated by sound.

More info http://www.furtherfield.org/soundecologies.php

stanza datacity

LISTENING IN THE CITY. SOUNDCITIES SOUNDMAPS.

Here are my sensors all over London collecting data….onto google maps.

www.soundcities.com/data.php

This is the data I  use to make sonicity.  Listening to the city with sensors.

Also see…

www.soundcities.com

This interactive website called soundcities.com allows the audience as creative user the possibility to remix the hundreds of samples recorded from around the world and then save their own mix. Soundcities is an online database of the thousands of sounds from around the world. The website also has series on online mixing desks where you can mix these sounds.  Soundcities uses city recorded soundscapes from world cities made over the last five years. All the sounds are now online also online as open source sounds. The database allows full open sourced access and listening to the individual sounds.  The Database is also open so anyone can upload sounds they collect from world cities, thereby making a contribution to the project and making an online sounds archive. Soundcities is the worlds first online soundmap project.

The Emergent City. Online visualizations, the networked city.

November 11th, 2008
stanza city

Stanza City: Generative Software System.

This text is a transcript of one of my talk about my work The Emergent City.

My current work remains focused on the creative use of technology integrated into urban space.My areas of interest include investigating new concepts for the relationship of the physical body, emergent data and real space in the built environment.

As an artist I am trying to create artistic metaphors for new creativity using new technologies and integrating new media artworks into the public domain. As an artist I am trying to create artistic metaphors for new creativity using new technologies and integrating new media artworks into the public domain. There are three strands of my working process; these involve; collecting the data, visualizing the data, and then displaying the data. The outputs from the online interfaces and online visualizations can be realized as real time dynamic artworks as diverse as installations, and real objects, made out of new display materials back in physical space. In all my work I try to exploit the changing dynamics of city life as a source for creativity and create meaningful artistic metaphors. I utilize new technologies and integrate new media artworks into the public domain as part of this ongoing research into the visualization of city space.

In essence I am researching data as a medium for creativity and how meaningful experiences of our cities may result. From a technological peprspective, I am researching sensors , motes, new display technologies and interactive architectures. This research includes investigations into…..Concepts for the relationship of mobile computing within urban space and the built environment.

The Emergent city is to be a group, a body of artworks that I am working on all connected by a central theme. As you know a city is a web of connected networks. In essence, the city fabric is a giant multi-user, multi-data sphere. The city is made up of traffic patterns, pedestrian patterns, bird flocking patterns. Patterns can be seen in the architecture, patterns in the buildings, patterns in the architectural fabric of the urban design network. All of these spheres can be represented by media and therefore by data within the digital realm. And all of this data can be interpreted and mediated. It becomes a matter of choice. Collections of data can be stored to be retrieved later. The mobile data infrastructure becomes a data source so powerful so interwoven that its scale can only be imagined as metaphor. The size and scope of such an archive, of such rich mediated data experience can support many projects. As such it can be interpreted via a variety of interfaces. Cities offer the opportunity for unique types of data gathering experiences via a variety of sources.

My objective is to ‘mediate’ data into conceptual artifacts. With this perspective there are many unimagined threads of data and connections that describe our world that can be explored through wireless mobile networks within which we can create artistic interpretations. There are various types of data can be re-imagined. This includes pollution data recorded via sensors in the street, to create audio files. Weather and forecast data, acquired via weather station equipment, this can be used and can create ambient soundscapes and morphing visualisations as the wind shifts direction or the rain increases. Noise monitor levels, and noise maps, create a symphony of true urban sounds that can be used to make sound reactive sculptures. So under this umbrella of ‘the emergent city’ project I have made a number of works that have move beyond the process of research, beyond what I term as asset gathering, into what might be alpha beta projects. An example of this is my URBAN GENERATION project. I have also made the online database for soundcities which now has 2000 sounds online line in it. So other artists can interface to it. Memory mapping. About traces and memories of urban space. Multiple viewpoints of data cities. The city also has millions of CCTV.

In essence the city is the biggest TV station in existence. Millions of hours worth of data are recorded every day by these cameras on city TV. One can take the sounds and images off live web streams and re-represent them thus creating new interpretations of the city in the process. The city already has a recorded source of data, CCTV is everywhere. Using data from CCTV, you can bring the outside inside. Selected feeds are collected from around the world in real time. These real time images are fed into a software system where a series of specialised channels rework these images. The channels are always on, and always changing, a constant view of the world changing and evolving around the clock. This uses specially created software and technology to randomly find images in real time from anywhere in the network, in this case anywhere in the world.The increase of technology infrastructure in the daily existence of a city means that technology will, more than ever be everywhere in our environment. Mobile data mining will be part of the fabric of the landscape. We will be carrying this data in pods, phones and ID cards. Everything is or will be tracked. CCTV, car sensors, tracking inside our phones and id card movement tracking in the guise of anti- terror activity. The patterns we make, the forces we weave, are all being networked into retrievable data structures that can be re-imagined and sourced for information. These patterns all disclose new ways of seeing the world. The value of information will be a new currency as power change. The central issue that will develop will be the privilege and access to these data sources. Uses of this information and data should allow rich new interpretations on the way our world is built, used, and designed.

So we need to imagine the city at a different scale. The possibility is to extend our imagination and enable that perception of the city as a dynamic network. We can now put systems in place that can re–employ our perception and thus create new understanding of how this behaviour unfolds. There are patterns, they are connected and the systems that evolve, can be simulated and acted upon. We can influence the process and the system and we can also create variables into this system that allows understanding of the bi-products of the system, the data and the resulting information Currently a research fellow at Goldsmiths Digital Studios.

datacity

Datacity: Sensors In The City. Stanza Visualisation.

I am scattering the city with sensors. Hundreds of them, some fixed, and some embedded, to access these data structures and to claim them for the public domain within the realm of social sculptures.I am trying to make smart networks that have data open to all, and not closed off spy surveillance oriented systems. The networks could be thought of as open social sculptures that can inform the world and create new meaningful experiences. Thousands of motes can be deployed across the city for gathering data in wireless sensor networks. Used in large numbers they can communicate with one another via radio signals across the network. They can reconfigure themselves, so that the network stays stable. The data is chanelled through a system to a point where it can then be interpreted. So the concept is to embed the city with thousands of motes to gather data for the creation of artistic artifacts. The motes can monitor sensors such as temperature, sounds, light, position, acceleration, vibration, stress, weight, pressure, humidity, and GPS. Motes and sensor boards can monitor the micro incidents of change in the city, the noise, traffic flows and people flows. The interactions of all this data, controlled via mixed up interfaces that can re-form and re-contextualise experiences in real time as social sculpture. Imagine walking out the door, and knowing every single action, movement, sound, micro movement, pulse, and thread of information is being tracked, monitored, stored, analysed, interpreted, and logged. The world we will live in seems to be a much bigger brother, than first realised. Its a world full of data that can help understand the fundamentals of our outside environment, and monitor the micro codes of our DNA, a world where we are liberated and empowered by data, where finally all of the technology becomes more than gimmick and starts to actually work for us.

So this is where I am at..scattering thousands sensors across the city and trying to figure this out.Sensity artworks are made from the data that is collected across the urban and environment infrastructure. I have a network of sensors which collects data, which is then published online. The sensors interpret the micro-data of the interactive city. The output from the sensors displays the “emotional” state of the city online and the information will be used to create installations and sculptural artifacts.These artworks represent the movement of people, pollution in the air, the vibrations and sounds of buildings, they are in effect emergent social sculptures visualizing the emotional state of the city. The sensor network can be moved from urban to rural setting and different types of visualization can be made depending on the environment. Sensity is an open social sculpture that informs the world and creates new meaningful experiences. Sensity is also a highly technical project that will give vast amounts of information about the fabric of our cities. By embedding the sensors like this we can re-engage with the urban fabric and enable new artistic metaphors within city space. The sensors are positioned across the city. Custom made software enables these sensors to communicate will one another in a network over a proxy server in real time. The data can also be used to create visualizations in an open source environment. Other online users can also re- interpret the data and interrogate the various sensors in the network as this is open sourced as well (see xml streams)l. Representations of these datasets will allow unique understanding of the urban environment and environment in real time. Motes are used to collect the data.

stanza

Datacity: Sensors In The City. Stanza Visualisation.

The ‘motes’ are tiny wireless sensor boards that gather data and communicate to the central server. The real world is monitored and the data stored in my archive retrieval system. Motes and sensor boards sense the micro incidents of change in the weather, the noise traffic flows and people flows. The interactions of all this data, controlled via interfaces that can re-form and re-contextualize experiences in real time. Sensity incorporates the holistic city system. The sense city is a city of, accumulated incidents of love, abuse and death. The micro incidents of change in the weather, the noise traffic flows and people flows. The archives of this data can be controlled via mixed up interfaces that can re-form and re-contextualize experiences in real time; to make emergent sculptures visualizations and sculptures. Sensity leverages the real time data city and represents it online showing the life of the system and the emerging changing bahaviours of the space. The data is the medium. Future cities will be merged real time connected up data cities. Sensity connects up networks of real time information flows. The results are mashed up cities and real time performative city mashings. The shared data space can overlap and there is a new space the space in between that only two nodes share. The aetheticization of the shared city space. I have merged collected data from various cities. The images below show an integrated architecture the space where the cities overlap and create a new architectural space. Technology. I now have several sensor kits both twenty nodes that can be placed up to 300 meters apart with GPS. I have made two versions of the Sensity interface software. One works with recorded data (ie recorded data) and one that works with the real time data, which means the sensors are switched on always and working through a router. The changing data is what affects what you see and experience. The sensors can monitor temperature, sounds, noise, light, acceleration, vibration, pressure, humidity, and gps. The sensors take a constant stream of data which is published onto an online environment where different interface can make representations of the XML and from this lots of artistic interpretations can be imagined.

Other artworks made:- HOUSE AND GALLERY:

see stanza.co.uk stanza (04 – 08)

ddc

Datacity: Sensors In The City. Stanza Visualisation.

Participatory Urbanism

May 23rd, 2008
Stanza Image.

Amber stanza with CCTV data globe (no reproduction rights allowed) 2005

Copyright Image by Stanza 2004

We argue there are two indisputable facts about our future mobile devices:

(1) that they will be equipped with more sensing and processing capabilities and (2) that they will also be driven by an architecture of participation and democracy that encourages users to add value to their tools and applications as they use them.

What happens when individual mobile devices are augmented with novel sensing technologies such as noise pollution, air quality, UV levels, water quality, etc? We claim that it will shatter our understanding of these devices as simply communication tools (a.k.a. phones) and celebrates them in their new role as measurement instruments. We envision a wide range of novel physical sensors attached to mobile devices, empowering everyday non-experts with new “super-senses” and abilities. All quoted from the website. Participatory Urbanism

stanza_softwarepeople_trails

Stanza image tracking people from CCTV 2004.

Internet Art and technology. Stanza 2003

January 9th, 2008

Artwork by Stanza: CCTV  Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

The computer has now become a central tool within new media creativity. We are starting to see more and more traditional artists move into the web from other media. This has happened because of a combination of economic conditions, and the artists continual ‘search for the new’.

The internet offers various economical and valuable distribution benefits for artists and artworks. New media creativity also offers a variety of shifting parameters within which the interpretation of previous art histories may be re-evaluated. This is why ‘expression’ and use of the internet as a medium, and a resource has expanded to envelop our new world framework and is embraced by so many artists and art colleges. The use of this new technology also offers a sense of belonging which was never exposed through various other art histories.

This sense of connection is one of several qualities inherent to the internet as a medium for creative expression; sound, visual effect, time, movement and interaction all provide new parameters for the development of contemporary art. Here we have the convergence of painting and printmaking, photography, film and music.

The merging of the audio visual is increasingly becoming a central issue in the development of interactive media. Web artists are fusing the arts, incorporating a wide range range of approaches to the medium of the internet and audio visual practice. Artists are producing new audio visual experiences, and this includes art , games, generative music, interactive environments.

Artists have always been influenced by technology. Previously the artist’s or musician’s studio was a place of many hardwares, softwares, and bits and pieces. Today instead of brushes and paint and wooden stretchers and huge space for storage we a have a small box that can be both studio and gallery. For musicians instead of all sorts of instruments and masses of expensive gear, we have the same small box the PC. So the convergence of hardware and software has enabled many types of creatives to meet or converge. The PC acts as studio and gallery. Works can be disseminated globally. The distribution system has changed and the artist has direct access to a bigger audience through his very own “white cube ” gallery.


It could be said we are now starting to see the emergence of a new art form. As the newness unfolds a history will unfold with it. At the moment there is a blurring of the boundaries as many approaches are adopted, and this is confused further because of the constantly changing and developing nature of technologies which also allows for the artwork themselves to change. We are starting to see a much bigger emphasis on works that generate and evolve.


Certainly there is now a whole new category of online art and music driven by computer technology.

Online, we have net art. These works encounter and engage the user without whose presence in the interactivity the work is not only meaningless but does not exist. Within the global exhibition of such works the parameters of the artists relationship to his audience has shifted ground. We see emerging, a shared multidimensional relationship to these works. So now we find that the computer, this box, is in fact the gallery, the exhibition space, the computer as white cube. This box has become specification for which these works are made and are experienced.


Fifteen to twenty years ago very few computers where being used by creatives in colleges or universities. Now a visit to any college will see classes of art , fashion, graphics, music, all huddled up around the computer screen.

Artists are specifically looking at creative possibilities for the computer and the internet as a medium. One thing seems obvious, more and more artists are being drawn to new media. The diverse range and plurality of backgrounds means that the specifics of this form are hard to evaluate. From design, music, art, and programming various skills are needed to produce work in the digital domain.

So to fully engage with the internet as a medium, the artist must adopt multiple skills and languages in addition to those traditionally associated with the arts. Presented with an internet specific artwork, the visitor must physically engage with the work to experience it as it is meant to be and by that I mean that the work must utilise the qualities inherent to the medium if it is to be considered internet art at all – time must pass, things must change, connection must be made for the experience to be complete.

Text stanza 2003