Archive for the ‘surveillance’ Category

Robotic Wireless Sensor Networks

January 27th, 2009

In the last decade, Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) have been successfully deployed to perform numerous automation tasks such as environmental monitoring, surveillance and inventory tracking. By introducing actuation capabilities (in particular controlled-mobility), robots have the potential to improve the capabilities of existing WSNs significantly. Recent advances in robotics as well as the availability of inexpensive robotic platforms have made it feasible to develop hybrid networks in which multiple mobile robots interact with each other and other static sensors to perform complex tasks. On the other hand, design and implementation of such hybrid systems bring forth new algorithmic and systems challenges related to coordination, planning, and resource management.

The goal of this workshop is to explore the algorithmic and systems aspects at the intersection of robotics and sensor networks. We seek work in a variety of areas including:

  • Development of hardware and software platforms
  • Experiences from deployments
  • Resource allocation algorithms
  • Novel research challenges and applications
  • Localization and route planning
  • Sensor tasking, control and planning

http://hinrg.cs.jhu.edu/RWSN09/Home

Portsmouth invests money in mother of big brother….

December 11th, 2008
Copyright Image by Stanza

Copyright Image by Stanza. From Stars Of CCTV Series of artworks.

Our social  agenda and relationship to city space is being driven,  “re-designed”; re engineered without thought by local councillors and policemen who are creating a society of mistrust. Haven’t they got something better to  spend money on , ie schools, education, buses  etc etc These guys just don’t seem to know what to  spend the council tax money on  so they keep  buying  and investing in CCTV.

Anti-social behaviour has become a familiar sight in some towns and cities across the country.

Now there’s a new weapon in the fight against it called Smart CCTV. Portsmouth City Council is the first, and so far only, local authority in the UK to try out the new system. It’s a computer programme that has been integrated into the city’s existing network of 152 cameras and has been programmed to spot unusual behaviour in places and at times when it’s not expected. For example, a speeding car being driven around an empty car park could be a joy rider or someone running through a deserted shopping precinct late at night might be a vandal.

When those and similar scenarios are ‘spotted’ by the software, using special parameters from programmers, an alarm is sounded which alerts CCTV operators to that particular camera.

It’s already been used in parts of seven cities across America, in places like New York and Washington DC, where the feedback has been positive. Nick Hewitson helped design the version Portsmouth City Council is using.

He said: “It filters out all the rubbish video that you don’t want and lets you see the stuff that you do want. “So you’re using human beings for doing what they do well, making subjective decisions on incomplete data.

“And using computers to do what they do well, process tonnes and tonnes of boring data.”

But not everyone in Portsmouth is as convinced by the new system as Ray Stead and Nick Hewitson.

Samilia Narcho, 19, told Newsbeat: “They are lurking a bit too much into people’s business. It’s a bit unfair on people who aren’t doing anything wrong. “It’s a bit too much invasion of privacy. Big Brother going a bit too far.”

But 18-year-old Chris isn’t worried about being watched. He said: “It doesn’t really bother me because I’m not doing anything wrong, so I’ve got nothing to worry about.” Berry, who’s 24, and 21-year-old Becky Pearson have different opinions on the new CCTV system. Berry said: “I think it’s pretty good because there are a lot of idiots in Portsmouth and they need to be kept under wraps.”

Becky added: “I can see why people think it’s a bit too much, with people being too watched.” The Smart CCTV technology is on trial in Portsmouth but if it proves successful, other UK cities could set up similar systems.

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So after the councils lost your money which was “invested” offshore in icelandic banks…now  they are investing in developing new software  for CCTV cameras. Basically Portsmouth is investing your money in mother of big brother….and the best sort of reporting the BBC  can come up  with is from chris  “But 18-year-old Chris isn’t worried about being watched. He said: “It doesn’t really bother me because I’m not doing anything wrong, so I’ve got nothing to worry about.”……either read a little history  or read a little science fiction  because I think there is plenty here to worry about Chris.

So the question is what sort of society do we want to live in twenty years?

Yes good idea lets go for the one where we don’t trust anyone at all, and have to monitor  everyone, everywhere, all the time…..brilliant idea….I wish I had thought of that.  But then again if I had a software company or CCTV system  I  would send my sales team be straight down to the local council to sell these idiots these systems too.

Real-time CCTV on London buses to improve public safety.

November 12th, 2008

Transport, and public money is leading the way  with technology but it is also being used as technology test beds. More experiments with tech on public transport all dressed up as protecting the public.
Icomera AB, the world’s leading provider of cellular broadband gateways, has announced that its Moovbox technology has been selected to provide real-time communications for a major trial of live CCTV on London buses to improve public safety. 21st Century CCTV, a division of TG21 plc, has equipped twenty-one double-decker buses in North London with the technology, which allows live images to be transmitted to a central control centre shared by officers from TfL and the Metropolitan Police’s Transport Operational Command Unit. The six-month trial on behalf of Transport for London (TfL) will monitor and analyse the use of the technology to decide whether it can help deal with incidents on buses more effectively.

“Transmitting CCTV streams is a bandwidth-intensive task,” said Ola Sjölin, Icomera CEO. “Our mobile gateways employ patented switching and load balancing technology that leverages multiple cellular backhaul links to provide the fastest possible connection for public safety applications such as this. Our relationship with 21st Century CCTV brings together two market leaders to create a best-of-breed solution ideally suited to intensive, mission-critical applications such as that Transport for London is trialing.”

“Robotica­- Control inside the panopticon” by Stanza

November 11th, 2008
Copyright Image by Stanza

Copyright Image by Stanza: Robots making paintings. 2008.

A world premier of Stanza’s Robotica: Control inside the panopticon playful robot installation – with performative and interactive aspects – that questions ideas of surveillance and tracking in popular culture using, robots, CCTV and sensor technologies.

Twelve robots – each named after prison inmate numbers – roam freely on a canvas on the floor of the Gallery. These robotic prisoners are sent out across the canvas with small tasks to complete. This robotic “wandering” is captured over the evening onto the canvas. They create their own painting in their own little prison. The idea of the Panopticon originated with the English utilitarian philosopher Jeremy Bentham as a prison design that would allow an observer to monitor all the prisoners at all times, without any prisoner being aware of whether he was being monitored or not.Like people, robots have common behaviours and can be programmed accordingly i.e. robots can follow a path (path following mode), the can avoid obstacles (avoidance mode) and they can operate in wander mode. They all try to avoid one another – depending on their proximity to one another – while searching the space. In doing so they demonstrate social behaviour.

In moving through the gallery people create a ‘memory space’- a reference to a past created by the traces and paths left behind. The patterns we make, the forces we weave, reveal different ways of moving through the space. These patterns disclose new ways of seeing the world. All the robots are recorded via CCTV and each is made to wear CCTV which is shown on a monitor which also records the event. Police “tape” keeps the robots inside their controlled space. The robots mimic and trace the patterns people make – but based on algorithms. The robots are tracked – everything is watched and recorded – and unlike people their movements can be networked into retrievable data structures that it can be re-imagined and sourced for information. The digital patterns of the robots are re-made as analogue patterns. The robot path is in effect replaced with a series of ‘brushes’ – and it is these that are wandering around the canvas. A series of actions are applied to the movement of the digital brush across the rectangular canvas to create these robotic generative paintings.

This artwork investigates the relationship between the analogue and the digital aesthetic. The robots wander over the canvas to make the image – and this also protects the floor. The suggested canvas size 2.5 by 5m – and therefore a reasonable floor space is needed. All the robots will see the edges of the canvas and turn around automatically) i.e. they are roped off and will not go wandering off on their own!

We are all becoming victims of the control state.

October 16th, 2008
Stanza.  Artwork

Stanza. Artwork

Jacqui Smith leads us down the path of total state control. (haven’t we been there before). Some more research needs to be done in this area, and the total lack of creative debate speaks volumes about this inept direction the ID, data, dna, CCTV society is moving.

Its time for a full scale review and creative think tank should be set up, to analyse use of new technologies, data mining, and misuse / abuse of technology. The police should stop setting the agenda. The public are not criminals, people on the buses are not criminals, our children are not criminals. We have are becoming victims of the control state.

Things change. There will always be danger in big cities, lets face it millions of people live in them. But the idea is that its fun to live and be in big places, not oppressive.

Where will it end when we are forced to carry id cards with rfid that trace all our habits, movement and views and earnings. Where will it end, when we have systems in place that cannot be removed, ( DNA searches, CCTV everywhere, government controlled banks, all phone calls recorded, mobile phone tracing our movement). Well for sure if we trust the government no problem. But governments change , not only that but ideologies change. And worse, businesses get sold. With governments outsourcing many of these databases like our utilities, these new data assets could be run by agencies in other lands.
From BBC below

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/7671046.stm

Details of the times, dates, duration and locations of mobile phone calls, numbers called, website visited and addresses e-mailed are already stored by telecoms companies for 12 months under a voluntary agreement.

Far more widely-used are powers to track a suspect’s telephone calls, texts, e-mails and internet use, to find out whom they’re communicating with, how frequently they’re in touch, and in the case of the internet, what websites they’re visiting.

This does not involve viewing or listening to content.

‘Vital tool’

This information – known as “communications data” – is held for billing and business use by telephone companies, communications firms and internet service providers.

The data may also include other details, such as the time a message or e-mail was sent, and the location from which calls are made.



There are clearly considerable civil liberty concerns and privacy issues which will need to be overcome for any new scheme to get off the ground.

Under legislation, law enforcement agencies can request access to communications data – the companies involved are obliged to hold on to it for 12 months. It’s a vital tool for police and the security and intelligence services – and not just for terrorism and serious crimes.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7671759.stm

The data can be accessed by the police and security services on request – but the government plans to take control of the process in order to comply with an EU directive and make it easier for investigators to do their job.

Information will be kept for two years by law and may be held centrally on a searchable database.

Without increasing their capacity to store data, the police and security services would have to consider a “massive expansion of surveillance,” Ms Smith said in a speech to the Institute for Public Policy Research earlier.

Data about use of telephones, internet and e-mails would be channelled to one central point, but the database would not store the content of people’s messages or calls.

Another possibility is that internet service providers and communications companies would be given some government funding to improve the way they collect and store data.

No decisions have been taken yet. There are clearly considerable civil liberty concerns and privacy issues which will need to be overcome for any scheme to get off the ground.

But counter-terrorism officials have warned that there is no time to lose. “The ground is shifting under our feet,” said one.

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The ground is “shifting” indeed. To a society based on mistrust where we are stopped getting off the bus daily to have bus passes checked by hundreds of waiting police. Our children are monitored in schools, they are being stopped daily and searched ( not hundred of times but over 2000,000 searches last year alone and the police want more.

I think its always a fair point when people say its ok I have nothing to hide. However badly trained police often traumatise young people with these searches. Face down on the floor surrounded by armed police, must nt be fun if your sixteen. This is not uncommon as one sixteen year old recently found out. So my point; imagine if this was your child, how would you feel, or imagine if it was you. So all you people saying its ok for more dna test, id card, cctv , and police searches you have to ask what sort of society are we be led into.

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Lib Dem home affairs spokesman Chris Huhne said: “The government’s Orwellian plans for a vast database of our private communications are deeply worrying.”

Errr..is that all you got to say.
“Ministers claim the database will only be used in terrorist cases, but there is now a long list of cases, from the arrest of Walter Wolfgang for heckling at a Labour conference to the freezing of Icelandic assets, where anti-terrorism law has been used for purposes for which it was not intended.” “Our experience of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act suggests these powers will soon be used to spy on people’s children, pets and bins.

“These proposals are incompatible with a free country and a free people.”

But Information Commissioner Richard Thomas said “lines must be drawn” to defend “fundamental liberties”.

Later he told BBC Radio 4’s World at One: “I’m not saying it’s right or wrong but I think there should be absolute full transparency.”

This is a great quote, talk about hedging your bets.
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So who is actually listening here. By setting up a think tank it could explore this notion “full transparency”, and what it means.
from

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/7671046.stm
The government’s own reviewer of anti-terror laws, Lord Carlile, said: “The raw idea of simply handing over all this information to any government, however benign, and sticking it in an electronic warehouse is an awful idea if there are not very strict controls about it.”

Shadow home secretary Dominic Grieve, said the government’s record on protecting data was “appalling” adding: “Putting all this data into the hands of the government will threaten our security, not make it better.

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Putting this information into the hands of any government will threaten our personal long term security, although its possible true the state itself might well be protected more by all this control. One has to understand the technology and the way it can be abused.

So the question is why the sudden mis- placement of trust in society and the current need and belief in technology to combat crimes.

This whole debate is between the police and wrongdoers and its now directing policy, energy and money.

Stanza painting Control. 1989. Oil On Canvas

Stanza painting Control. 1989. Oil On Canvas

Google are our big brothers. Masters of our Universe.

July 7th, 2008

And we thought google was just a search. Well, for the past few years they have come up with some cool tools. But now it seems their cards are on the table, their intentions are clear. Its world domination by surveillance culture. We are just data and google aims to “own” us.

Think of  Will Smith in the film “Enemy of The State”, and then maybe we are getting close. Google in two months, two years, or twenty years.  Maybe its cool we can all watch each other going peacefully about out business as long as google make our faces blurred, what planet are google on, google earth?…yeah right.

So just what are Googles longer term intentions here? Spying on us through serach algorithms in the digital world is one thing, tracking us via open internet is another….time for the ethical debate to be brought to the centre stage with some creative input other than it makes the world a safer place.

ref

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7492844.stm

Google has defended its controversial Street View photo-mapping tool, saying it will meet local privacy laws in European countries at launch.

The tool, which matches real world photos to mapped locations, has drawn fire from some privacy campaigners.

In the UK, Privacy International said the tool could breach data protection laws if people’s faces were shown.

Google has said it is using face blurring technology to preserve the privacy of individuals photographed.

“In our view they need a person’s consent if they make use of a person’s face for commercial ends,” Simon Davies, of Privacy International told BBC News.

Street View has already been launched in the US and includes photos of streets in major American cities. Photographing of areas in the UK, including London, is believed to have started last week.

Mr Davies has written to Google asking for details of the face-blurring technology, saying he would ask the UK Information Commissioner to intervene if he did not receive a satisfactory response.

He told BBC News that he was concerned that Google’s technology would not work.

Google’s senior privacy counsel Jane Horvath has responded saying that the technology had already been deployed.

So Jane I guess thats all right then is it.?

Copyright Image by Stanza

Copyright Image by Stanza: Globals live visualusation of media over the net 2004

Shows my live maps work from 2004…..now google maps can just take what they  want.

They  even have a photo of me in my house on google earth that they  took just as the google van passed…( glad I had my shorts on)..? Will google become the enemy of the state? ….

Stanza image from 2004. Global…Never the same again always different….forever.” by Stanza 2004

CCTV: ART HISTORIES.

July 1st, 2008

Video installation by Bruce Nauman.

Live Taped Video Corridor (1970)

http://bridell.com/tag/bruce-nauman/

In Live/Taped Video Corridor, you walk down a long, very narrow corridor. At the end of the corridor there are two monitors on top of each other. The lower one shows a video tape of the corridor, the upper one shows a live (CCTV) video of the corridor, shot from a camera at a height of about 3 meters, at the entrance of the corridor. The effect is that as you walk down the corridor, you see yourself from the back, and as you approach the monitor you get further away from the camera so you never really get any closer to “yourself”.

Corridor Installation (Nick Wilder Installation) 1971 consists of an inaccessible room and six corridors, three of which may be entered. Navigating these spaces we encounter a series of television monitors that relay our image taken by CCTV cameras. The positioning of the cameras is such that the information displayed on the monitors contradicts that of actual experience: we are left with a feeling of confusion and even isolation.

http://www.tate.org.uk/liverpool/exhibitions/nauman/guide/room4.shtm

To enter these works is to become a performer, yet at no time are we in control. Such are the spatial limitations that we can only make a limited number of responses, predetermined by the artist: ‘Whatever ways you could use it were so limited that people were bound to have more or less the same experiences I had.’ Viewed by some invisible authority, we become like rats in a cage, revealing generic patterns of human behaviour.

Vito Acconci, ‘Following Piece’ 1969

Vito Acconci, like Nauman, was also one of the first artists to really experiment with surveillance in his art. In Acconci’s ‘Following piece’1969, he took his surveillance to the streets and over the course of a month he closely filmed and documented the movements of anyone that happened to cross his path. Without the control and predictability of a gallery space, his films were documents of ‘real life’ as it occurred, and with them ranging from a few minutes to a few hours in length, it was an exaggerated exploration into the idea of ‘Big Brother is watching you’: it also analysed the intusion of personal space within a public area.

Julia Scher – ‘Security by Julia IX’ 1990. Julia Scher creates elaborate installations based around security and surveillance and invites the audience to become part of the work by playing the role of both the surveyor and the surveyed in her pieces ‘The Shurmann House’1991 and ‘Security by Julia IX’ 1990. By setting up cameras throughout the space, the viewers can look at themselves, watch others and wonder who could be looking at them in return.

Manu Luksch _ Faceless. ‘In a society under the reformed ‘Real-Time’ Calendar, without history nor future, everybody is faceless. A woman panics when she wakes up one day with a face. With the help of the Spectral Children she slowly finds out more about the lost power and history of the human face and begins the search for its future.

Chris Oakley

The Catalogue. ‘Placing the viewer into the position of a remote and dispassionate agency, observing humanity as a series of units whose value is defined by their spending capacity and future needs.’ http://www.chrisoakley.com/the_catalogue.html

Ann Stoddard makes interactive installations in which viewers are profiled via CCTV. These works explore how context can make viewers more aware of privacy and trust issues, less accepting of CCTV. At www.annstoddard.net, see: RANDOM SUBJECTS; Application Center, Waiting Room; Datapaint- Surveilling Utopia. My next show opens March 26th at the District of Columbia Art Center (DCAC), Washington DC. Please contact me at astoddard@net-site.com if you have questions, and to request images, a video-dvd, a press release, reviews. I hope to hear from you.

ctrl[space] : Rhetorics of Surveillance from Bentham to Big Brother. Edited by Thomas Y. Levin, Ursula Frohne and Peter Weibel (USAUK). The book was put together around an exhibition about surveillance organised from October 2001 to February 2002 at the ZKM, Centre for Art and Media in Karlsruhe (Germany). The art pieces are treated extremely well with plenty of photos and a text often written by the artists themselves.

The Sensity flanuer. The patterns in the city

January 9th, 2008
OIl On Canvas by artist Stanza. Virus

OIl On Canvas by artist Stanza. Virus

While Baudelaire characterized the flâneur as a “gentleman stroller of city streets”, he saw the flâneur as having a key role in understanding, participating in and portraying the city. A flâneur thus played a double role in city life and in theory, that is, while remaining a detached observer. This stance, simultaneously part of and apart from, combines sociological, anthropological, literary and historical notions of the relationship between the individual and the greater populace.

This term refers to a person who plays a sensor role in understanding the urban environment.

Any pedestrian environment that accommodates leisurely exploration of city streets. Walter Benjamin adopted the concept of the urban observer both as an analytical tool and as a lifestyle….. making social and aesthetic observations during long walks. (From wikipedia)

The wrap it seems, is the collections of observations about the cityspace. These can be made into histories and documented, sights and sounds, experiences of the city.

 

“’Space has to be conceptualised in order to be experienced and understood, our ‘sites’ are informed by the predisposed character of our ‘sight’. The flaneur is a suitable metaphoric vehicle for the ‘witnessing’ of this space because ‘the flaneur moves through space and among the people with a viscosity that both enables and priviledges vision.’

Being a product of modernity, he was a spectator of modern life in the urban sprawl; now a product of post-modernity, the cyborg-flaneur is an androgynous spectator of virtual spaces. A person’s whose aim is to disappear in the spaces of the city – ‘a prince who is everywhere in possession of his incognito’ – is the person who has the best view of the basic nature of cyberspace, a space where anonymonity is maintained by a process of vaporisation upon departure.

The flaneur is also an ‘image of movement through the social space of modernity’ – an explorer who finds their identity among the realizations of the city. The cyber-flaneur’s exploration of virtual spaces is achieved through their natural propensity for movement; they wander anonymously within the boundaries of virtual space, developing a virtual identity while connected.” By Gaylene Barnes, OtagoUniversity, 1997.

 

I am exploring the patterns in the city from walks through technological observations. There are system loops from analogue to digital. In Sensity I am make the work virtual, visualizing the real city data and then representing it online, then making an installation city in the real world through display and leds. That’s is from real to virtual to real in a complex loop of assets.

Sensity has an agency it manifests sites and sounds of the real work expressing the stresses and senses of the real urban networked space.

On reflecting on recent surveillance based work I am also making systems with analogue and digital that appear the same. Uncovering the process of that exists in making the artworks.

“The Metropolis and Mental Life” by George Simmel.

“Man does not end with the limits of his body or the area comprising his immediate activity. Rather is the range of the person constituted by the sum of effects emanating from him temporally and spatially. In the same way, a city consists of its total effects which extend beyond its immediate confines.”

And maybe data doesn’t start or end inside the computer. There is bleed at the edges of the dataspace which are affected by the ‘agency’ of the participants. Environments change shape and patterns emerge as the flaneur move about.

Art on spheres. Stanza 3d display globes with data and surveillance.

June 1st, 2007

I have for the past four years been trying to make a large scale display of live data in a globe screen; and I have made several works in this area. I first made this proposal to the Watershed in 2004 and developed several concepts and prototypes with them through my Clarks bursary.

stanza 3d globe

Stanza. Art on spheres. Stanza 3d display globes.

3D globe with live data. 2004.

This research was also followed through with my Nesta Dreamtime Award in 2004, and I also pitched it to the Nesta business unit to make a real globe in 2004 (to develop this as a display device) as part of my Nesta Dreamtime outputs.

stanza 3d globe

Stanza. Art on spheres. Stanza 3d display globes.

Pitch to Watershed to place data glove outside the media centre..image 2004…the pitch was made again in 2006, when I sent the proposal for SOUL on the globe.

As part of this research I looked at other 3d globes of which have appeared in the last five years such as Omniglobe and Pufferfish. Indeed Pufferfish now has a really nice 3d globe that they market as a display for trade fairs.

Stanza Image. cctv

Live CCTV. Stanza. Art on spheres.

Stanza image..live CCTV on Globe. Shown here at County Hall Pufferfish Globe. 2006

I was going to make my own globe at one stage in 2003 but didn’t have the money to pursue. I also was involved with BDS it its inception, ie as a director of BDS, when we made a globe in China by project images onto Armand’s Weather balloon which we took to China, which looked quite nice. (I subsequently left them and only worked with them for the brief period in China).

stanza image

Stanza image from China. We tried this experiment in China….on a large weather baloon. The image shows a live CCTV camera of mine, which was showing a picture from my house. 2003

stanza image

stanza image 2004

also this one showing live images from Mexico CCTV being hacked 2003. the image on the globe is the data and time stamp of the CCTV camera

I have subsequently developed some relations with Pufferfish to show work on a 3D globe which they developed. Indeed they where kind enough to let me test some work on their display.

stanza image

stanza image 2004. 3d Globes

Stanza image on Pufferfish display…live sensors from across the city showing live data in a real 3d globe, in this case the work Sensity. 2006

I cannot claim to own any patents on globe technologies unfortunately, however what all my ideas in this area have in common was a goal to make a 3d display technology and place it in an artistic context as a sculptural display.

Live CCTV

stanza image 2004. 3d Globes

LIVE CCTV for a globe hung above the city. 2004.

My artistic goal was much more focused on the nature and use of this technology.

So this for the past four years I have been researching the use of live data for art gallery use indoor and outdoes to make a piece of work from a fine art perspective ie for cultural use, that would appear as a 3d globe.

I have used live CCTV images, realtime news feeds and various forms of live data from my own sensor networks. Indeed the idea of “globe” was essential to my metaphor of a world full of data, and archive, a meta ball of information.

This process hasn’t been easy, as well as trying to develop prototypes for four years I having been applying for arts grants to install a 3d globe to show live data in an art gallery. I pursued this idea of a globe showing live data from a cultural perspective ie real time information from various sources so the whole piece becomes a data globe, a world focused on the nature of live data and information flow. I want this to be both an outdoor public sculpture but also a piece indoors in an art gallery.

stanza globe with live feeds

Stanza image 2004. 3d Globes

Stanza live feeds on globe. 2004

I had also applied to Space 4 gallery in Peterborough where they said yes to the idea. (They had agreed a one man show that subsequently fell through) Indeed their curator Lisa Helin made a bid to the arts council on my behalf…or rather she filled the form in only for it to be rejected in 2006, by London Arts.

I had also pitched the globe project to The Watershed where my original ideas were formed as part of a Clarks Bursary in 2004.

I also pitched this as Sunderland Winter Gardens where I came second in a shortlist process in 2006.

Series of Sketches for SOUL…live data in the city.

I was also recently approached by a consortium in the United Emirates about this concept but it fell through this was such a disappointment as they where planning a series of them.

I think it would be great at the Tate Gallery, Turbine Hall if it looked like this with live data in it.

stanza

stanza image 2004. 3d Globes

Amber Stanza in Turbine Hall…image shows live data (CCTV feeds from around the TATE on huge globe…

It would look like this…………………..

Links to my works on this…

2006: http://www.stanza.co.uk/sensity/index.html
2004: http://www.stanza.co.uk/micro_city/index.html
2004: http://www.stanza.co.uk/global/index.htm
2006: http://www.stanza.co.uk/soul_globe/index.html
2006: http://www.stanza.co.uk/biocities/index.html
2006: http://www.stanza.co.uk/newsfeeder/index.html

In short I am still trying to this, so if anyone wants to commission me get in touch.

As you might know if you read this Blog. I am the recipient of an AHRC research fellowship. The concept of displaying live data on unique technologies is also one of my listed outputs of my fellowship.

Indeed Helen Sloan of Scan and Gill Haworth and all at the Watershed Media centre are supporting me in my endeavour find galleries and public art spaces who are interested on exhibiting my work.

Proffesor Janis Jefferies at Goldsmiths is also helping look for outputs for this

If you are a gallery and you want to exhibit my work contact me.

All images on this page copyright Stanza

Sensity in Italy Festival at Share IT. The art of environmental data

March 21st, 2007

ddcPIEMONTE_SHARE_FESTIVAL | TORINO, 23 – 28 GENNAIO 2007: From over 200 submitted works, an international jury shortlisted six works that were exhibited at the festival, from which one prize winner is selected.

Sensity was selected but they just set up a projected version rather than the live sensor network. Like with many other festivals, there is one prize only that is not tied to a specific technology or genre but rather to their combination and to the expression of ideas.

A series of artworks based on connecting city spaces. The results are visualisations and sonifications of real time spaces using my own wireless sensor networks and environmental sensor technologies.

Sensity artworks are made from the data that is collected across the city. The sensors interpret the micro-data of the interactive city or responding city space. The outputs from the sensors networks then display the “emotional” state of the city online, in real time. The information is also used to create offline installations and sculptural artworks. Several artworks (sonfications and visualisations) have been made connecting up space and cities.

All the artworks in this series by Stanza use data from the real time environment. A new city experience results based on the mash up meta data from these multiple cities streams. Sensity leverages these real time data city streams and represents it online, showing the life of the system, opening up the system, and the publishing emerging changing bahaviours of the space.

As all things becomes connected and networked, my concept will be become a system that senses not just the city but the whole world. Eventually sensors will be linked to give a real time global visualization. ~ Public domain data resource for art and environmental monitoring.

 

Surveillance Cultures . The central issue that will develop will be the privilege and access to these data sources.

November 14th, 2005

In essence London is the biggest TV station in existence. Millions of hours worth of data are recorded every day by these cameras on city TV. One can take the sounds and images off live web streams and re-represent them thus creating new interpretations of the city in the process. The increase of technology infrastructure in the daily existence of a city means that technology will, more than ever be everywhere in our environment. Mobile data mining will be part of the fabric of the landscape. We will be carrying this data in pods, phones and IDS cards. ballin-bristollaserEverything is or will be tracked. CCTV, car sensors, tracking inside our phones and id card movement tracking in the guise of anti- terror activity.

The patterns we make, the forces we weave, are all being networked into retrievable data structures that can be re-imagined and sourced for information. These patterns all disclose new ways of seeing the world. The value of information will be a new currency as power change. The central issue that will develop will be the privilege and access to these data sources.