Archive for the ‘books’ Category

Hacking Habitat In Utrecht

March 3rd, 2016

Curated by Ine Gevers, Hacking Habitat witnesses  “the rise of a ‘remote control society’ colonizing and infiltrating increasing realms of daily life for the sake of safety and risk- management. Monitoring cameras and smart gateways are installed everywhere, while we are classified and atomized by automatic face recognition. Software and algorithms define who deviates or contributes too little to our economy. ”

Featuring Joseph Beuys (DE), Melanie Bonajo (NL), James Bridle (UK), Felix Burger (DE), Centre for Political Beauty (DE), Johan Grimonprez (BE), Susan Hiller (USA), Samson Kambalu (MW), William Kentridge (SA), Laura Kurgan (USA), Cristina Lucas (ESP), Metahaven (NL), Pedro Reyes (MX),  Stanza (UK), Timo Arnall (NO),  and many others.

 

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The Nemesis Machine is a miniature city, made up of wires, chips, computer parts, switches and specially designed electronics. The installation shows the current data flow of Smart City London, complete with environmental sensors and surveillance cameras, as well as data from traffic information and environmental monitoring systems. The work responds to the temperature, light, pressure and sound of the simulated city. If something changes in London, it’s registered directly in motion, sound and light in the miniature city of Utrecht. The Nemesis Machine is like the avatar of London and is not only driven by the real city, it is entirely dependent on it.15-STANZA-0414b-mj9m0abah8kt7ms5qmn5wpy6cqlj20tpijnm1zlokg

The Nemesis Machine is een miniatuurstad, opgebouwd uit kabels, chips, computeronderdelen, schakelaars en speciaal ontworpen elektronica. De installatie toont de actuele dataflow van Smart City Londen, gemeten met omgevingssensoren, bewakingscamera´s, verkeersinformatie- en milieumonitoringsystemen. Het werk reageert op o.a. temperatuur, licht, luchtdruk en geluid van de nagebootste stad. Als iets wijzigt in Londen, zie je dat direct terug in beweging, geluid en licht in de miniatuurstad in Utrecht. Nemesis Machine is als het ware de avatar van Londen en wordt niet alleen real time bestuurd door de echte stad, maar is er volledig van afhankelijk.

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Stanza in this book Art Practice in a Digital Culture

June 12th, 2011
Art Practice in a Digital Culture Edited by Hazel Gardiner, Edited by Charlie Gere.
There are a series of my images and Janis Jefferies has referred to a number of artworks.

Research as art, Charlie Gere; Triangulating artworlds: gallery, new media and academy, Stephen Scrivener and Wayne Clements; The artist as researcher in a computer-mediated culture, Janis Jefferies; A conversation about models and prototypes.

Much as art history is in the process of being transformed by new information communication technologies, often in ways that are either disavowed or resisted, art practice is also being changed by those same technologies. One of the most obvious symptoms of this change is the increasing numbers of artists working in universities, and having their work facilitated and supported by the funding and infrastructural resources that such institutions offer. This new paradigm of art as research is likely to have a profound effect on how we understand the role of the artist and of art practice in society.

In this unique book, artists, art historians, art theorists and curators of new media reflect on the idea of art as research and how it has changed practice. Intrinsic to the volume is an investigation of the advances in creative practice made possible via artists engaging directly with technology or via collaborative partnerships between practitioners and technological experts, ranging through a broad spectrum of advanced methods from robotics through rapid prototyping to the biological sciences.

Art Practice in a Digital Culture - Digital Research in the Arts and Humanities

Front cover shows Stanza images Public Domain.2008

Some Cities. Our relations with cities are like our relations with people. We love them, hate them, or are indifferent toward them.Victor Burgin.

December 18th, 2008
Copyright Image by Stanza

Copyright Image by Stanza 2004. Shanghai.

Copyright Image by Stanza . Title. The Brilliant City Shanghai 2004

“Our relations with cities are like our relations with people. We love them, hate them, or are indifferent toward them. On our first day in a city that is new to us, we go looking for the city. We go down this street, around that corner. We are aware of the faces of passers-by. But the city eludes us, and we become uncertain whether we are looking for a city, or for a person.”

Victor Burgin recalls some of the cities he has known in a way familiar to all who have traveled, by showing photographs and telling anecdotes. Some Cities gathers places and moments along a life route that the author has taken from the north of England to his present home in northern California. Stops on the way include such disparate sites as London, Berlin and Warsaw; Singapore, Woomera and Tokyo; New York and San Francisco; and the islands of Stromboli and Tobago.

Some Cities is unlike anything Burgin has ever done before, although it explores characteristic themes of his earlier theoretical and visual works, such as the dimensions of politics and sexuality in everyday life.

“Burgin traces his life’s route from the north of England through such metropolises as London, Berlin, Singapore, Tokyo, New York and San Francisco in brilliant black and white photographs and in anecdotes presented in immaculate prose.”—The Guardian

Information Arts: Intersections of Art, Science, and Technology

November 4th, 2008

Information Arts offers one of the only comprehensive international surveys of artists working at the frontiers of scientific inquiry and emerging technologies.

Its goal is to describe this art, explore its theoretical rationales, and alert readers to possible future directions.  It is also one of the only sources available that reviews cutting edge techno-scientific research in a way accessible to those without extensive technical backgrounds.  It will be of interest to artists, art historians, electronic media designers, technologists, scientists, researchers, and more general audiences interested in the future of research that will have significant impact on the culture. by Stephen Wilson.
Professor, Conceptual/Information Arts, Art Department, San Francisco State University. MIT Press/Leonardo Books. 2002

The Practice and Promise of the Real-Time City by Marcus Foth

October 12th, 2008
Description:  due out dec 2008

Alive with movement and excitement, cities transmit a rapid flow of exchange facilitated by a meshwork of infrastructure connections. In this environment, the Internet has advanced to become the prime communication medium, creating a vibrant and increasingly researched field of study in urban informatics. Handbook of Research on Urban Informatics: The Practice and Promise of the Real-Time City brings together an international selection of 66 esteemed scholars presenting their research and development on urban technology, digital cities, locative media, and mobile and wireless applications. A truly global resource, this one-of-a-kind reference collection contains significant and timely research covering a diverse range of current issues in the urban informatics field, making it an essential addition to technology and social science collections in academic libraries that will benefit scholars and practitioners in an array of fields ranging from computer science to urban

The Cyborg Self And The Networked City. William J. Mitchell.

June 22nd, 2008

Image: Stanza Spiral Jetty 2007 live data visualisation in the grounds at Goldsmiths College London.

Copyright image Stanza artwork…

ME ++. The Cyborg Self And The Networked City. William J. Mitchell. The Mit Press.2003.

Networks connections and the interrelatedness of things that flow through our bodies, our building
“Code is mobile.  Code is everywhere.  And code-for both people and machines who interact with them – is the law”

Unreal City. Urban Experience in Modern European Literature and Art.

April 18th, 2008
stanza china

stanza photo from china 2004


Unreal City. Urban Experience in Modern European Literature and Art.

Edited by Edward Tims and David Kelley.

Manchester University Press. 1985ISBN 0 7190 1748 3

Page 1 Forward.

Around the 1900 century the city became the focal point for an intense debate about the dynamics of technological civilization and its effects on the quality of human life. The Futurist manifesto of 909 identified the city as the pre eminent theme of modern poetry and painting.

….page 2 …”the Futurists picture the city as unstable and insecure”

page 3….as Ezra Pound pointed out in his comments on Eliot’s The Waste Land: “ the life of the village is narrative…..In a city the visual impressions succeed one another, overlap, overcross, they are cinematographic”.

Page 4…The city ceases to be pictured as a social environment and it is transposed on to an existential plane. The metropolis ultimately becomes a metaphor – a dynamic configuration of the confiding hopes and fears of the twentieth century.

Page 47 by Fank Whitford. “It was he constantly shifting experience of the city which concerned him (Monet), not the experience of living in it.”

In 1914 Ludwig Meidner published and essay about painting urban subjects asserting that painting modern cities needs a different approach from Monet and the impressionists.

From Medneir.

“Let us paint what is close to us, our city world.! The wild streets , the elegance of iron suspension bridges, gas tanks in which hang in white – cloud mountains, the roaring colour of buses and express locomotives, the rushing telephone wires aren’t they like music?), the harlequinade of advertising pillars, and then night….big city night”.

From Frank Whitford page 49…”for Meidner his conception of the city….had to be thoroughly subjective and could only be depicted in a fragmentary and metaphorical way.

Page 52….The visual aspects of the city is so complex, Kirchner argues, so different from one second to the next, that the painter must resort to exaggeration and other kinds of distortion in order to convey the authentic impression of it.


1912. The Street Enters The House” by Umberto Boccioni. He included elements on the periphery of our vision and attempts to evoke the sensation of noise and colour by distorting forms and exaggerating colours. The city is growing before ours eyes.

Page 57…”Nature now seems finally to have been mastered. The City, in which nature was most obviously tamed, confined to parks, tubs and pots, seemed to be a symbol of that mastery”

Marinettis’s manifesto makes it clear that Futurism was an urban movement.

…page 58 “The city is a living thing, a restless superhuman creature in whose presence puny man can only stand and wonder”

In 1912 Robert Delauney painted “The City Of Paris modified after influence from the Futurists. Delauney describes this paintings as a “living and simultaneous”surface an “ensemble of rythms”. Quoted in Virginia Spate, Orphism (Oxford,1979), p.205 where The City of Paris is reproduced.

Stanza:
Writing played a huge part in the metaphorical and poetic interpretation of world cities. But it is through cinema that we can appreciate the scale, pace movement and patterns that where emerging in the modernist city. The imagined city is constructed in Fritz Lang’s Metropolis (1926). It is an imagined city, a city of the future a city that is seen time and time again in modern science fiction films like The Fifth Element. Lang referred to The Tower of Babel, the massive control tower in Metropolis is called “The New Tower Of Babel. The comparison to
Babylon within the city has become common in metaphorical language of the city ever since cities really became too large for easy assimilation. Lang’s city thus becomes a city of “idea”.

Stanza Towers 2004 from Diversity

Stanza Towers 2004 from Diversity

Maps. Finding Our Place In The World. (Book)

January 10th, 2008

Stanza paintings of maps

Maps. Finding Our Place In The World. Edited by James r. Akerman and Robert W.Karrow Jr. Published 2007 by The University of Chicago Press.

In chapter five (page 2008) Michael Friendly and Gilles Palsky write about data visualization and information visualization. Data visualization about showing “patterns, trends or anomalies in ways other forms do not allow ie text and tables”. Various types differ (see page 210 ), they are communication devices conveying information from target to viewer using signs and symbols.

Sensity is a mix of the information map showing exploration, ie revealing pattern and structure about an area. Data maps show the “qualative information across space, time or circumstance.” Sensity and the mix of GPS , temp , light and sound to create audio visual real time landscapes also merges with the art map and fantasy maps.

Page 262.

Historical fantasy maps includes Sandro Botticelli, chart of Hell (1490). Other famous fantasy maps include Robert Louis Stevenson’s “Treasure Island”( 1883), or Herman Moll’s map of Lilliput (1726). All of these are complete fantasy maps, and the most famous being the maps from The Lord of the Rings. All of these maps are the maps of imaginary worlds.

My interest is in the information from the real world made into a virtualized experience over time. This data can be merged to create imagined situations bout the time and space these events happened.

In the visual arts of the late 20th century (page 283) there has been an explosion in the interest of maps in the visual arts. The maps of the modern art world aren’t fantasy maps like their predecessors, they are often conceptual, or used in performance and installation and often engage in questions of mapping with socio political overtones as the Situationists did.

The Central City by Stanza in Art Monthly

April 22nd, 2006
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Image: Stanza artwork shows live CCTV feeds. 2006

This is a review of  The Central City by Stanza in Art  Monthly 2002. Since the advent of modernity the experience of the city has been characterised by a vibrant mix of audio-visual sensations. Signs, streets, buildings, reflections, voices, traffic merge into a chaotic simultaneity that is always more than the sum of its parts. The city’s networks and rhythms are also mirrored in the virtual realm of cyberspace and data transmission. While we all know what actual, living cities look like, many attempts at representing cybercities rely on a reductionist aesthetic of simulation, glossily rendered depictions of ‘liquid architecture’ or complex exchanges of information (as in the projects of Knowbotic Research). What both worlds (as well as much art, of course) have in common is the grid, a cellular structure that inevitably proliferates through arterial streets and cables into urban sprawl or information overload. Stanza has been mining the urban environment for imagery since the early 80s, initially in the form of large, monochrome paintings of South London tower blocks, offices and architectural details, then in photographs that experimented with various darkroom techniques, followed by videos displaying a repetitive grid structure and which are also available from the artist in the form of wallpaper. Stanza’s fragmentary, immersive approach to the transient flux of urban structures reaches its apogee in The Central City, an online Internet-specific work that is now in its third version (www.the centralcity.co.uk). Each of its 30 sections, or ‘areas’, consists of several Shockwave movies that combine animated digital imagery based on urban motifs, including maps, buildings, towers and streets, with sound samples taken from the same urban environment. Much of the material is self-generating – that is, as the user mouses over different areas, different sequences are activated as overlays and replicating patterns of organic shapes. The effect is quite stunning, as the user feels empowered to use the mouse like a brush, painting a continually evolving canvas and soundscape, choosing new mixes from a palette of effects. Digital sprawl becomes a metaphor for the living organism that is urban chaos.

While the pristine sterility of the Corbusian city has given way to the dystopian reality of crumbling tower blocks, so too has cyberspace been corrupted by viral infections and rabid, self-generating organisms. This is reflected in the names that Stanza has given to the different areas of The Central City, such as ‘megalopotron’, ‘matrixity’ and ‘germix’. Other sections, like ‘small worlds’ or ‘fibrinet’, are almost painterly in a Futurist sort of way, while others exploit the computer’s well-known ability to make semi-transparent, three-dimensional cubes rotate on their axes. ‘Proser’ offers poetic meditations (appropriately formatted as stanzas) on the urban condition, some of which can also be sung along to in another section that features a jukebox (for streaming audio) and a karaoke machine.
The works are all contained within the window of the frame, itself a grid structure whose coordinates determine the position of the user’s cursor. This is the point at which Stanza’s works become interactive, since they depend on mouse movements.

Having begun as a painter, Stanza still hopes that his interactive audio-visual digital works can somehow be appreciated within the tradition of painting. His Amorphoscapes (www.amorphoscapes.com) are actually described as paintings and are designed to be shown in the form of projections or large plasma screens which would change according to movements of people in the room. It is even envisaged that multiple users would be able to control the appearance of artworks via online networks using wireless technologies.

Like the movies in The Central City, the Amorphoscapes use generative sounds and navigable images based on an ingenious programming language that offers the user plenty of surprises, although there is a danger that the form achieves more prominence than the content. Stanza has also initiated the soundtoys.net website which offers a platform and showcase for other artists working with new audiovisual media. At present it hosts more than 50 projects, many of which use Shockwave or Flash formats to present new forms of graphical interfaces offering users considerable control over mixing the audio and visual elements. Soundtoys exhibits the diversity of the Internet and the explosion as well as the convergence of new digital technologies, particularly in the area of generative and interactive programming.

Michael Gibbs.  Art Monthly. March 2002

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Sensity: The online interfacing of live real time sensors networks allows a communication with environment, with real space in the present.

January 10th, 2006

Screen-Shot-2013-08-10-at-21.43.03dSensity: Environments. The ‘environment’ in these projects is created from a wireless multi nodal multi sensor network that is in place. The analogue is made digital and the digital can be formed into a variety of output devices.The flow of the data can be set to affect the behaviour of the output environment. The data environment that is created is a mapped on top of the space, a virtual data map or the real world. The environment is intelligent its just that we don’t know how to communicate with this space yet.

Within Sensity there is now a loop from the real to the virtual and back to the real. This notion of playing or manipulating with a malleable form (data) is made possible as each stream, each node, each sensor, or even the entire network can be communicated with using this xml online gateway.

We have seen rich shift in relational and responsive interactive works and the move away from gallery as a venue for art to the use of architecture and public domain space in the last twenty years.

In an age of global warming, so many artists are still using the architectural space as a coloured light bulb. As we burn more fossil fuels the light are flashing on and off.

Can Sensity be made more physical on output to represent of the growth of the city as an experience in the real world away from the screen. A city representation of the fabric of city space end the emerging patterns caused by these data flows.

An art city can be made where the data powers the wind turbines, the data changing the solar panels that change the lights. Loops of real time data change the meaning all the while changing the input and output which is (e)merging into a new space.

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Can Sensity be made more physical on output to represent of the growth of the city as an experience in the real world away from the screen. A city representation of the fabric of city space end the emerging patterns caused by these data flows.

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