Archive for the ‘data’ Category

Maps. Finding Our Place In The World. (Book)

January 10th, 2008

Stanza paintings of maps

Maps. Finding Our Place In The World. Edited by James r. Akerman and Robert W.Karrow Jr. Published 2007 by The University of Chicago Press.

In chapter five (page 2008) Michael Friendly and Gilles Palsky write about data visualization and information visualization. Data visualization about showing “patterns, trends or anomalies in ways other forms do not allow ie text and tables”. Various types differ (see page 210 ), they are communication devices conveying information from target to viewer using signs and symbols.

Sensity is a mix of the information map showing exploration, ie revealing pattern and structure about an area. Data maps show the “qualative information across space, time or circumstance.” Sensity and the mix of GPS , temp , light and sound to create audio visual real time landscapes also merges with the art map and fantasy maps.

Page 262.

Historical fantasy maps includes Sandro Botticelli, chart of Hell (1490). Other famous fantasy maps include Robert Louis Stevenson’s “Treasure Island”( 1883), or Herman Moll’s map of Lilliput (1726). All of these are complete fantasy maps, and the most famous being the maps from The Lord of the Rings. All of these maps are the maps of imaginary worlds.

My interest is in the information from the real world made into a virtualized experience over time. This data can be merged to create imagined situations bout the time and space these events happened.

In the visual arts of the late 20th century (page 283) there has been an explosion in the interest of maps in the visual arts. The maps of the modern art world aren’t fantasy maps like their predecessors, they are often conceptual, or used in performance and installation and often engage in questions of mapping with socio political overtones as the Situationists did.

Surveillance artworks: experiments with realtime images.

October 22nd, 2007

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Stanza artwork: Live CCTV online remixed in real time. 2004

Projects with tangible outcomes for the mobile infrastructures. Using CCTV to create emergent artefacts and new ways of seeing the city. In the UK there is one CCTV camera for every 14 people. If you are in London, you could be caught on camera up to 300 times a day. Westminster City Council in London have come up with a solution – CCTV cameras without wires, which broadcast their pictures back to base using the council’s new wireless network. The advantage a wi-fi network camera is the mobility.

The pilot scheme uses five discreet cameras to monitor people’s comings and goings in Soho Square. Wireless CCTV cameras make it easier for more and more cameras to be installed.

“Within the Soho Square we have a network of wireless LAN bridges providing blanket coverage throughout the square,” said Tim Hearn of Cisco Systems which is providing some of the technology. “Down the narrows streets, Greek Street and Frith Street, we have Wi-Fi pointing down those streets as well so they give us coverage down there.” So that’s a network of wireless LAN devices that we then plug into CCTV cameras, we provide access to mobile workers that will have laptops of mobiles working with them, or maybe some specialist devices. “We’re also linking into noise monitoring devices or other sensors,” he said. Sourced from the BBC website.

The city already has a recorded source of data, cctv is everywhere. Using data from cctv, artists can bring the outside inside. Selected feeds are collected from around the city in real time. These real time images can be fed into software systems where a series of specialised channels rework these images. The channels are always on, and always changing, a constant view of any city or environment evolving around the clock.

I have made a system or art project called ccityv which uses specially created software and technology to randomly engage any camera globally. The system can grab images from any source.

I have to extend this to network cameras in the Bristol area. It is now possible to go further and get everyone in Bristol to tell us where webcams and cctv systems are; we could also set up some of our own. We can then grab all this imagery and edit it rework it and manipulate it inside the software.

Using pdas we can also send users to find the cameras to be recorded and re-engage with the world of surveillance. This system can capture portraits to monitor, and we can use it to tell stories and narrative in the street that can come into the ccityv project. This allows a process to start whereby we can get the outside inside and the inside outside. Data maps can be set up using the mobile Bristol software so that users can find these cameras and put themselves in the pictures. Then when it is updated you would be updated into the archive online. So the public can have all sorts of fun with this. The public can use cameras to make narratives, take portraits, subvert the surveillance process etc.

My system is online and can be engaged with in the everyday use by anyone. Most importantly it is inside the gallery projecting onto display devices. Note this is in real time, it is also online (see urls below); see the date and time stamp on each one. Also if a camera does not load please wait and a new one will be found immediately. Sometimes cameras go offline. The first image to load is a ‘dummy’ image.

Stanza artworks using CCTV

URBAN GENERATION

http://www.stanza.co.uk/urban_tapestry/index.html

YOU ARE MY SUBJECTS

http://www.stanza.co.uk/i_spy/index.htm

http://www.thecentralcity.co.uk/ccityv/

http://www.stanza.co.uk

stanza cctv artwork

Stanza image of cctv artwork.

The results are like an online realtime vj system mixing CCTV  images from around the worlds in real time.

bristolglobe

Cloud of data in Bristol. 2003. Live data responsive system

Art on spheres. Stanza 3d display globes with data and surveillance.

June 1st, 2007

I have for the past four years been trying to make a large scale display of live data in a globe screen; and I have made several works in this area. I first made this proposal to the Watershed in 2004 and developed several concepts and prototypes with them through my Clarks bursary.

stanza 3d globe

Stanza. Art on spheres. Stanza 3d display globes.

3D globe with live data. 2004.

This research was also followed through with my Nesta Dreamtime Award in 2004, and I also pitched it to the Nesta business unit to make a real globe in 2004 (to develop this as a display device) as part of my Nesta Dreamtime outputs.

stanza 3d globe

Stanza. Art on spheres. Stanza 3d display globes.

Pitch to Watershed to place data glove outside the media centre..image 2004…the pitch was made again in 2006, when I sent the proposal for SOUL on the globe.

As part of this research I looked at other 3d globes of which have appeared in the last five years such as Omniglobe and Pufferfish. Indeed Pufferfish now has a really nice 3d globe that they market as a display for trade fairs.

Stanza Image. cctv

Live CCTV. Stanza. Art on spheres.

Stanza image..live CCTV on Globe. Shown here at County Hall Pufferfish Globe. 2006

I was going to make my own globe at one stage in 2003 but didn’t have the money to pursue. I also was involved with BDS it its inception, ie as a director of BDS, when we made a globe in China by project images onto Armand’s Weather balloon which we took to China, which looked quite nice. (I subsequently left them and only worked with them for the brief period in China).

stanza image

Stanza image from China. We tried this experiment in China….on a large weather baloon. The image shows a live CCTV camera of mine, which was showing a picture from my house. 2003

stanza image

stanza image 2004

also this one showing live images from Mexico CCTV being hacked 2003. the image on the globe is the data and time stamp of the CCTV camera

I have subsequently developed some relations with Pufferfish to show work on a 3D globe which they developed. Indeed they where kind enough to let me test some work on their display.

stanza image

stanza image 2004. 3d Globes

Stanza image on Pufferfish display…live sensors from across the city showing live data in a real 3d globe, in this case the work Sensity. 2006

I cannot claim to own any patents on globe technologies unfortunately, however what all my ideas in this area have in common was a goal to make a 3d display technology and place it in an artistic context as a sculptural display.

Live CCTV

stanza image 2004. 3d Globes

LIVE CCTV for a globe hung above the city. 2004.

My artistic goal was much more focused on the nature and use of this technology.

So this for the past four years I have been researching the use of live data for art gallery use indoor and outdoes to make a piece of work from a fine art perspective ie for cultural use, that would appear as a 3d globe.

I have used live CCTV images, realtime news feeds and various forms of live data from my own sensor networks. Indeed the idea of “globe” was essential to my metaphor of a world full of data, and archive, a meta ball of information.

This process hasn’t been easy, as well as trying to develop prototypes for four years I having been applying for arts grants to install a 3d globe to show live data in an art gallery. I pursued this idea of a globe showing live data from a cultural perspective ie real time information from various sources so the whole piece becomes a data globe, a world focused on the nature of live data and information flow. I want this to be both an outdoor public sculpture but also a piece indoors in an art gallery.

stanza globe with live feeds

Stanza image 2004. 3d Globes

Stanza live feeds on globe. 2004

I had also applied to Space 4 gallery in Peterborough where they said yes to the idea. (They had agreed a one man show that subsequently fell through) Indeed their curator Lisa Helin made a bid to the arts council on my behalf…or rather she filled the form in only for it to be rejected in 2006, by London Arts.

I had also pitched the globe project to The Watershed where my original ideas were formed as part of a Clarks Bursary in 2004.

I also pitched this as Sunderland Winter Gardens where I came second in a shortlist process in 2006.

Series of Sketches for SOUL…live data in the city.

I was also recently approached by a consortium in the United Emirates about this concept but it fell through this was such a disappointment as they where planning a series of them.

I think it would be great at the Tate Gallery, Turbine Hall if it looked like this with live data in it.

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stanza image 2004. 3d Globes

Amber Stanza in Turbine Hall…image shows live data (CCTV feeds from around the TATE on huge globe…

It would look like this…………………..

Links to my works on this…

2006: http://www.stanza.co.uk/sensity/index.html
2004: http://www.stanza.co.uk/micro_city/index.html
2004: http://www.stanza.co.uk/global/index.htm
2006: http://www.stanza.co.uk/soul_globe/index.html
2006: http://www.stanza.co.uk/biocities/index.html
2006: http://www.stanza.co.uk/newsfeeder/index.html

In short I am still trying to this, so if anyone wants to commission me get in touch.

As you might know if you read this Blog. I am the recipient of an AHRC research fellowship. The concept of displaying live data on unique technologies is also one of my listed outputs of my fellowship.

Indeed Helen Sloan of Scan and Gill Haworth and all at the Watershed Media centre are supporting me in my endeavour find galleries and public art spaces who are interested on exhibiting my work.

Proffesor Janis Jefferies at Goldsmiths is also helping look for outputs for this

If you are a gallery and you want to exhibit my work contact me.

All images on this page copyright Stanza

Sensity in Italy Festival at Share IT. The art of environmental data

March 21st, 2007

ddcPIEMONTE_SHARE_FESTIVAL | TORINO, 23 – 28 GENNAIO 2007: From over 200 submitted works, an international jury shortlisted six works that were exhibited at the festival, from which one prize winner is selected.

Sensity was selected but they just set up a projected version rather than the live sensor network. Like with many other festivals, there is one prize only that is not tied to a specific technology or genre but rather to their combination and to the expression of ideas.

A series of artworks based on connecting city spaces. The results are visualisations and sonifications of real time spaces using my own wireless sensor networks and environmental sensor technologies.

Sensity artworks are made from the data that is collected across the city. The sensors interpret the micro-data of the interactive city or responding city space. The outputs from the sensors networks then display the “emotional” state of the city online, in real time. The information is also used to create offline installations and sculptural artworks. Several artworks (sonfications and visualisations) have been made connecting up space and cities.

All the artworks in this series by Stanza use data from the real time environment. A new city experience results based on the mash up meta data from these multiple cities streams. Sensity leverages these real time data city streams and represents it online, showing the life of the system, opening up the system, and the publishing emerging changing bahaviours of the space.

As all things becomes connected and networked, my concept will be become a system that senses not just the city but the whole world. Eventually sensors will be linked to give a real time global visualization. ~ Public domain data resource for art and environmental monitoring.

 

Stanza: Surveillance and Data Visualisations.

May 9th, 2006

A further selection of artworks from the Parallel Reality Series. They depict events captured from live networked surveillance systems. These works are located within the theme of privacy and surveillance. Surveillance “involves the collection and analysis of information about populations in order to govern their activities. Stanza writes “the patterns we make, the forces we weave, are all being networked into retrievable data structures that can be re-imagined and sourced for information. These patterns all disclose new ways of seeing the world.” The artworks are made using custom made computer software using digital techniques developed by Stanza. Each picture contains thousands of surveillance based images using a system that captures and then manipulate the images over selected periods of time. Some images represent an hour of time, some are overnight and some show weeks.

Stanza London CCTV Media Visualisation 2005

Stanza London CCTV Media Visualisation 2005.

Stanza Los Angeles CCTV Media Visualisation 2005

Stanza Los Angeles CCTV Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Stanza: News feeds Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Stanza: News feeds Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Stanza: CCTV  Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Stanza: CCTV Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Stanza: CCTV  Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Stanza: CCTV Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Stanza: CCTV  Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Stanza: CCTV Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

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The Central City by Stanza in Art Monthly

April 22nd, 2006
stanza_netart

Image: Stanza artwork shows live CCTV feeds. 2006

This is a review of  The Central City by Stanza in Art  Monthly 2002. Since the advent of modernity the experience of the city has been characterised by a vibrant mix of audio-visual sensations. Signs, streets, buildings, reflections, voices, traffic merge into a chaotic simultaneity that is always more than the sum of its parts. The city’s networks and rhythms are also mirrored in the virtual realm of cyberspace and data transmission. While we all know what actual, living cities look like, many attempts at representing cybercities rely on a reductionist aesthetic of simulation, glossily rendered depictions of ‘liquid architecture’ or complex exchanges of information (as in the projects of Knowbotic Research). What both worlds (as well as much art, of course) have in common is the grid, a cellular structure that inevitably proliferates through arterial streets and cables into urban sprawl or information overload. Stanza has been mining the urban environment for imagery since the early 80s, initially in the form of large, monochrome paintings of South London tower blocks, offices and architectural details, then in photographs that experimented with various darkroom techniques, followed by videos displaying a repetitive grid structure and which are also available from the artist in the form of wallpaper. Stanza’s fragmentary, immersive approach to the transient flux of urban structures reaches its apogee in The Central City, an online Internet-specific work that is now in its third version (www.the centralcity.co.uk). Each of its 30 sections, or ‘areas’, consists of several Shockwave movies that combine animated digital imagery based on urban motifs, including maps, buildings, towers and streets, with sound samples taken from the same urban environment. Much of the material is self-generating – that is, as the user mouses over different areas, different sequences are activated as overlays and replicating patterns of organic shapes. The effect is quite stunning, as the user feels empowered to use the mouse like a brush, painting a continually evolving canvas and soundscape, choosing new mixes from a palette of effects. Digital sprawl becomes a metaphor for the living organism that is urban chaos.

While the pristine sterility of the Corbusian city has given way to the dystopian reality of crumbling tower blocks, so too has cyberspace been corrupted by viral infections and rabid, self-generating organisms. This is reflected in the names that Stanza has given to the different areas of The Central City, such as ‘megalopotron’, ‘matrixity’ and ‘germix’. Other sections, like ‘small worlds’ or ‘fibrinet’, are almost painterly in a Futurist sort of way, while others exploit the computer’s well-known ability to make semi-transparent, three-dimensional cubes rotate on their axes. ‘Proser’ offers poetic meditations (appropriately formatted as stanzas) on the urban condition, some of which can also be sung along to in another section that features a jukebox (for streaming audio) and a karaoke machine.
The works are all contained within the window of the frame, itself a grid structure whose coordinates determine the position of the user’s cursor. This is the point at which Stanza’s works become interactive, since they depend on mouse movements.

Having begun as a painter, Stanza still hopes that his interactive audio-visual digital works can somehow be appreciated within the tradition of painting. His Amorphoscapes (www.amorphoscapes.com) are actually described as paintings and are designed to be shown in the form of projections or large plasma screens which would change according to movements of people in the room. It is even envisaged that multiple users would be able to control the appearance of artworks via online networks using wireless technologies.

Like the movies in The Central City, the Amorphoscapes use generative sounds and navigable images based on an ingenious programming language that offers the user plenty of surprises, although there is a danger that the form achieves more prominence than the content. Stanza has also initiated the soundtoys.net website which offers a platform and showcase for other artists working with new audiovisual media. At present it hosts more than 50 projects, many of which use Shockwave or Flash formats to present new forms of graphical interfaces offering users considerable control over mixing the audio and visual elements. Soundtoys exhibits the diversity of the Internet and the explosion as well as the convergence of new digital technologies, particularly in the area of generative and interactive programming.

Michael Gibbs.  Art Monthly. March 2002

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