Archive for the ‘networks’ Category

The Internet of Things World Forum (IoTWF)

May 25th, 2017

Stanza at The Internet of Things World Forum (IoTWF.  Stanza big data, Smart cities, IOT , internet of things , art, software Stanza at The Internet of Things World Forum (IoTWFStanza artwork on show at the The Internet of Things World Forum (IoTWF) is an exclusive industry event, hosted by Cisco. The IoTWF is widely recognized as the premier thought leadership forum designed to Evangelize and Energize IoT. Known as a must-attend event for key stakeholders and innovators in business, government, and academia, IoTWF brings industry leaders together to collaborate, network, partner, and solve the challenges facing IoT.

Previously held in Barcelona, Chicago, and Dubai, in 2017, IoTWF moves to London, Europe’s fastest growing technology capital. The 2017 IoTWF will explore the impact of IoT on business, technology and society and define a clear sense of the major priorities and challenges facing business as the world migrates towards IoT.

 Stanza big data, Smart cities, IOT , internet of things , art, software

Stanza big data, Smart cities, IOT , internet of things , art, software at the internet of Things World Forum thanks to Cisco Systems.

Dundee Contemporary Arts NEon 2016

November 13th, 2016

The artwork reforms this information and data creating parallel realities. At the heart of this work lies an interest in the urban environment, the networks of cameras and sensors to be found there, and the associated issue of privacy and alienation. The work sits in the middle of concepts for smart cities, The Internet of Things( IOT) and the new technologies that monitors the real time environment. In appearance, the Nemesis Machine is like Big Brother parsed through the lens of the Internet of things. It gives visitors a bird’s eye view of a cybernetic cityscape, where skyscrapers are constructed of silicon and circuit boards.

stanza_neon 284-web The Nemesis Machine stanza_neon-299-web

The Nemesis Machine

 

“Data as Culture” artwork made for the Open Data Institute (ODI).

November 30th, 2012

Stanza dtata artworkI have just been commissioned and unveiled my artwork  made for the  Open Data Institute (ODI), and curated by Julie Freeman .  The work  is part  of “Data as Culture”…. “As data becomes more accessible to artists, as it opens up for use as a raw material, we are seeing more of its integration into works that explore environmental socio-political and economic aspects of society.

By utilising data in an experiential way, this selection of works pulls data out of the virtual domain and into our physical world. The exhibition provokes discussion around what open data is, how it informs and affects us, and how we interpret it in a way that is meaningful.”

Body 01000010011011110110010001111001 (2012) By Stanza. Body is a sculpture which responds to the emergent properties of the environment in South London where the artist’s wireless sensor network is situated. It represents the changing life and complexity of urban space as a dynamic, kinetic artwork. Real-time environmental data is embodied in Stanza’s life-size sculpture assembled from computer components and acrylic slices of his own physique. In ‘Body 01000010011011110110010001111001’ the urban environment provides a dynamic flickering and clicking sentience to the otherwise inert structure, reflecting the personal level of influence data has on an individual.

also see

www.stanza.co.uk/body/index.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Art that explores questions raised by modern society – about privacy, surveillance culture….

September 23rd, 2012

STANZA’s art explores questions raised by modern society – about privacy, surveillance culture, and who owns the data that is regularly collected about all of us – often using modern technologies to create his pieces. Since he first started exhibiting his works in 1984, STANZA has strived to create cutting edge art that deals with current issues. In the process he has won several impressive awards, including an AHRC arts fellowship, and has seen his work featured in over 50 different exhibitions globally.

Ahead of a installation of one of his works “Capacities” in Ghent, Belgium in September, Solomon Radley met with him, in front on a computer monitor at his studio in South London, to talk in depth about what he does over coffee.

Hey, how’s it going? Would you begin by telling me a bit about what you do?

STANZA: The things that I’m interested in are ‘surveillance space’, which is the idea of the city as having become a panopticon – this idea that we’re in a prison and we can be observed at all times, from all perspectives, all at once, and particularly in real time.

I use various technologies to do that, like CCTV and wireless sensor networks. Over the years, firstly I’ve developed a strong understanding of what these technologies can do in terms of learning about them, but also I’m having to develop for them, so I’ve learned how to develop hardware and software. You may think I’m a technologist – I see myself as a creative technologist, and I also see that artists are engineers, so they have to understand the technologies that they use, and the mediums that they use in order to get output.

To bring that into perspective, we can look at some artworks…

Sure thing. Would you expand on your thought that the city is a sort of prison?

STANZA: Urban Generation is a piece I did in relation to this idea of the city being a panopticon. Let’s say, in modernist terms, an artist would go out and collect assets – he might use a recording device or a camera – it would be a still, linear asset, and it would never change. It’s possible to actually conceive of the city as a moving physical entity, moving forward in time all the time. How is it possible to use new technologies to actually gain a representation of this, and use it in a culturally meaningful way?

Urban Generation attempts to imagine the world from everyone else’s perspective all at once. If I’m giving a talk, what I try and do is – to illustrate the conceptual shift – I say: “I’d like you to close your eyes, and I’d like you to imagine yourself in a place in London. I’m going to do the same and I’m going to take a single mental snapshot, and I’d like you all in the room to take your single snapshot. Now, I’d like you to imagine the view of the people sitting next to you to your left and to your right, so you have three images multiplied together. There’s 300 people in the room; I’d like you to merge all of these 300 images together. And now not like a film, (because if we used a film we’d be recording the same images) what I’d like you to do is to move these images forward in real time.”

This is the idea I’m trying to capture with this piece of work.

A lot of your work is concerned with the question of who owns the information that is regularly collected about people, and with re-claiming that information. Tell me about this idea.

STANZA: I make artworks that arise from my research into these themes – the themes being ‘control space’ and ‘surveillance space’ and issues with privacy. What I’m doing, which is sort of new ground, is that I’m hacking access to a network and re-appropriating the data and information, and I’m re-contextualizing to give it a wider meaning. I want to show that you can do something positive with this data.

Other works where I’m interested in the control and ownership of data include this website called GenoMixer, where I fully sequenced my blood. In a sense this looks like artist self-portraiture, but I was interested in thedomain space – the public domain space – that’s inside our bodies.

We have this huge line of code – 3.3 billion letters – and it basically has an economic value. The proposal here is to IPO (Initial Public Offering) the project on the stock market, and to give everyone a share of the derivable intellectual royalties. For example, if somebody else wanted to investigate your DNA in a medical program they’d have to pay you. If some other company discovered the cancer gene because you were on the police forensic database you could say “No it’s copyrighted – it’s on the GenoMixer database”.

It just so happens that I also made a series of self-portraits with them…

One of the most obvious types of information that is commonly collected about the general public is video images gathered by CCTV, and this is something you often look at. What are your thoughts about CCTV?

STANZA: Let’s look at “Urban Generation – trying to imagine the world from everyone else’s perspective, all at once“. What we’ve got here is: each square on this four-by-four grid is making calls to over 100 cameras in London in real time. This is a parallel reality, using live network data to re-appropriate it over the network and use it for something else. For example, this could be used as an extension on landscape painting.

Why this has become quite interesting, and the reason I mention these modernist aspects that are fixed, is that this work is never the same. You could look at it even now, on a different monitor, and it would be different: It’s not the Mona Lisa – where every time you look at the work you experience the same thing – there’s an added problem here.

Another interesting question here is: Is what we’re looking at the artwork? On July 7th in 2005 they switched this entire network off because of the terrorist attacks. Well my system still worked, it’s just that the output – which is what connects a viewer to the system – is shifted.

This [Public Domain Responsive Architecture Facade] is the same concept using CCTV, observing the whole of the city but making it transparent. Why would you want to make your movements open and transparent? Why would you want to let CCTV be seen by everybody? This is a building with its outer surfaces displaying images that are embedded in the city – all the stuff on the outside of the building is shifting in terms of the real time properties of that city. In a sense, you (as the observed individual) become part of the building and part of the city, and this opens up the idea of transparent architecture and transparent space.

Public Domain is another work along the same theme, where I gave CCTV cameras away to members of the public, to open up this idea of CCTV networks. People sometimes say that they’ve got nothing to hide, and to nothing to fear…I think that’s a problematic statement. I’m not coming down on a particular side of the fence here, but it seems to me that we’ve opened Pandora’s box, and there’s a whole series of legislative and ethical issues that aren’t being addressed.

Hopefully what I’m doing in these artworks is to draw attention to the fact that there’s a whole series of potential problems that we’re walking in to.

You also play with collected data, which you use to create interactive works or installations where real-time changes are caused by environmental factors…

STANZA: We’ve already looked at my CCTV system. There’s another one, which uses wireless sensors/wireless nodes. You scatter them across the city, and they talk to each other in a network grid.

This research started in 2004 as a result of an AHRC grant that I was awarded, and I was trying to find a system I could use as open source hardware and software, that would monitor the whole city space. I’ve scattered these sensors around a city to generate visualisations and sonifications in various cities. For my first project [Sensity] they were output onto a visual globe.

So, now what I was interested in doing is looking at this real time data, that’s now everywhere, and seeing if I could do something else with it – if I could make art with it.

Equally, in Sonicity I deliberately put a whole load of speakers on the floor and connected them all up to make it look like a map, and somewhere else (in another part of the world) that data is being collected from my network and being spat out onto the internet via an XML stream. In arty terms, maybe I’m “painting with data” – the data has become the medium. With this data I’m painting a sonification of the real time landscape.

The second thing I was trying to think about, as part of this thinking process, was all the stuff that’s being collected about us – not just my data, but tax data and medical records – which could be used because of the way it changes and shifts from one thing to the next to power other events:

With CapacitiesI made…let’s call it a sculpture…a sculpture of computer parts that looks like a city, and would be powered by events changing somewhere else in real time. In this version of Capacities, all the lights and fans, and all the parts that change, do so because of other things happening in the world in real time.

The reason I’m trying to do that is that there seem to be other values that people are missing in terms of the things that are happening to us, and the world, in real time. We’ve become bodies residing in a ‘data space’. Everything around us is the data space and by default we interact with it – even small movements displace millions of atoms.

I conceive of this post-modern world in which movements are just moving a series of 0s and 1s. I can measure the 0s and 1s that I’m displacing by moving around. This interactive process is embedded in the work by default.

Visitors to a Gallery… is quite an important work, in that it opens up the gallery space as an artwork. For example, these two people that are pictured aren’t actually in this room – they’re in another room in another part of the gallery, so they’re embedded in the artwork that you’re viewing. Everybody in the architectural space becomes part of the artwork, and this happens in real time – it’s not recorded, and it’s not a film. So I utilize the technology in the space (the CCTV system).

Secondly, what’s happening here is that there are a series of proximity sensors that affect this as an algorithm – as you walk around this space all of these images oscillate/vibrate slightly.

So when you’re in the room, viewing this artwork, you’re at the same time generating an artwork for someone else in another room?

STANZA: And you’re in the work you’re viewing yourself, through your interaction with the sensors.

That’s also happening in Seeing Through Walls, where there are little cameras and monitors, so you become embedded in the same artwork as it’s being broadcast live, or in this piece where you can see through to people on the other side of the wall.

I was actually in a Greek club where they had something like that – the mirrors in the toilet let you see yourself, but also the women doing their makeup in the adjacent toilets…

STANZA: Ha! No wonder their ecomony’s gone down the pan…

Moving on from that, my work splits into this idea of using real time networks and investigating different ways of interacting with public space.

Here’s a strange project called The Binary Graffiti Club, where I got a load of people to dress up in hoodies with 0s and 1s on their backs, and they go round the city making binary graffiti – painting little coded messages onto the city.

Anything in particular?

STANZA: Well…no. I don’t want to be too specific about this, because… Well here’s a piece going back to the DNA project (the open source bit). If you sit in the gallery for…this has been online for seven years: If it was exhibited in a gallery you could get my open source DNA, and you could go off and replicate me, but it changes a letter once every second so you’d have to sit there for 104 years with a pen and paper. The same is true of the binary graffiti club – if you want to know what the message is, you have to sit there and transcribe it and translate it.

One letter from STANZA’s DNA code – the letters are shown in order, one per second for the 104 year project

This led from another piece of work – A City of Bits – as well as this performance that was laid down in the form of this sushi: I invited 12 people, after the disciples, and asked them to come and eat this coded sushi message. So, this is a coded message that they eat, and then they all put their own message back into a jar which I’ve now destroyed. I’ve transcribed those messages here…

You have a performance coming up in Texas soon – tell me a bit about what you’ll be doing.

STANZA: In Soundcities, using a recording device, I’ve been to all these different cities, recording sounds which are attached to Google Maps, and you can visit lots of cities in the world…

The key to this is the database; you can see the sounds, arranged in different categories, and you can create a performance by picking a selection of them and building up rhythms. This is what I do with my performances, except I have the same thing on a couple of machines, and I might mix it with sounds from churches, etc. It’s basically a live world tour of city sounds as music: the machines are connected to a mixing desk, images are coming from the website projects.

During the eight years I’ve been doing these performances, they’ve been heavily focused on the sounds of cities, the database live and soundmaps.

So this database can be used in performances, but the key here is that the database is open source, and other people can contribute to this community of sounds. There’s lots of other projects that have come from this, but the most important bit is this. This XML feed shows the sound, and its longitude/latitude, and although this is just a line of code it basically means that anyone else can use this to write their own apps.

What I’m doing that’s unique here is: it’s like an artist of the past allowing someone into their studio to work in parallel with them.

www.stanza.co.uk

Issues In Science And Technology, Spring 2012. Dear Hillary Rodman Clinton

April 13th, 2012

For those of you who know me well, you might find this quite funny. I was recently asked to for twelve images for a US based magazine who said they wanted to do a feature on Stanza. I thought why not, so I prepared the images 300 dpi for the editor as requested and sent them off. A couple of weeks later with a 44 dollar stamp they sent me four copies, very kind. (Most journalists don’t event bother)

Stanza Sensity

Stanza Sensity

Anyway its always nice to see your artworks in print over breakfast and they did look nice. Twelve images of “Sensity”, the live city data art project in the magazine Issues In Science And Technology, Spring 2012. However on first glance I couldn’t believe it they had used my images it seemingly to illustrate a text that wasn’t about me or by me. Off I steamed…. this editor needs an email.

Anyway before I  shot myself in the foot, I thought I better give it a read. The article is  on “Internet Freedom and Human Rights”,  just my thing, I wonder who wrote it……err

Dear Hillary Rodman Clinton thanks for using my artworks in your essay…. …

I got another coffee together and gave it a proper read, it’s not bad actually.  “the more people online contributing ideas,  the more valuable the network becomes to all the other users”………

“If we are not careful, governments could upend the current Interent governance in a quest to increase their own control….”…The last point rather timely since the UK are about do just that.

Stanza Sensors On Google Maps

Stanza Sensors On Google Maps

(http://www.stanza.co.uk/sensity/index.html)

VIRTUAL INTERNET CITIES. LIVE DATA CITIES. BY STANZA 2007

December 8th, 2010

VIRTUAL INTERNET CITIES.

The Emergent city

The city experience is a web of connected networks and multi layered threaded paths that condition us to the emotional state of the city space. In essence, the city fabric is a giant multi user multi data sphere. To take part you really have to put something back in, that’s like life. In this case, to take part you have to input data so others ‘may’ see the output of the data response.

Stanza CCTV artwork

Image: Stanza CCTV artwork using 200 CCTV cameras over one night. 2005

Lets imagine a space in which every action, memory, thought, feeling,  has a connection to every other action. A space where all data in the system, seamlessly integrates with all others. This place exists, it’s inside our heads. The emergent metaphor of the brain has many similarities with the emergent connectivity of cities.

Panic Noise

Mobility can be seen from traffic patterns, to pedestrian patterns, to bird flocking patterns; to multi-threaded patterns along a time line. Patterns can be seen in the architecture, the buildings, the architectural fabric of the urban design network. And closer inside the micro patterns of the city, we have the life cycles of the atomized, the insects, the life of continuity all of which exist along a timeline of past present and future. The city has a history. Stories relative to time and place, stories from the street. Love stories personal and  extreme, crime stories, stories that are small or that can affect global parameters. Inside the mobile city there are future stories and future worlds to invent and discover.

 

All of these spheres can be represented by media and therefore by data within the digital realm. And all of this mobile data can be interpreted and mediated. It becomes a matter of choice. Collections of data can be stored to be retrieved later. The mobile data infrastructure becomes a data source so powerful so interwoven that its scale can only be imagined as metaphor.  The size and scope of such an archive, of such rich mediated data experience would support many projects.  As such it can be interpreted as history via one sort of interface or as a game via another sort of interface.

 

Cities offer the opportunity for unique types of data gathering experiences via a variety of sources. An emergent  process data mining from all sides, online  for  all.  People collecting data, sounds, stories, photos, that can be filtered back into such a system.

 

stanza art data city

 

A possible objective is to ‘mediate’ data into conceptual artifacts. With this perspective there are many unimagined threads of data and connections that describe our world that can be explored through wireless mobile networks within which we can create artistic interpretations.

The network that all this takes place in is the grid of the city. In Shanghai in the planning museum you can see this in one room by looking at the model of the whole city. Mobile devices, wireless, or sensor devices, can trace and track you through such a system where data impacts to unfold meaning. This data can in effect be for aesthetic purposes as well as for marketing, and delivered as any type of media.

A model of the city could be made in this case as a simulated experience. An example of this is a controlled ultrasound sensor rig which pings sound in relation to ones position in the system (used in my Robotica artwork). It will allow you to fade sounds as you move about. Another example would be GPS positioning systems within real cities spaces, or which there a number of projects in development worldwide, and I used it for example in “Sheep“.

 

Types of data can be re-imagined. This includes pollution data recorded via sensors in the street, to create audio acoustic files expressing the pain and suffering of the air as it pollutes. Weather and forecast data, acquired via weather station equipment, this can be used and can create ambient soundscapes and morphing visualizations as the wind shifts direction or the rain increases. Noise monitor levels, and noise maps, create a symphony of true urban sounds that can be used to make sound reactive sculptures.

The city also has millions of CCTV. In essence the city is the biggest TV station in existence. Millions of hours worth of data are recorded every day by these cameras on city TV. I take the sounds and images of live web streams and re-represent them thus creating new interpretations of the city in the process.

Third Great Revolution

The State doesn’t allow access to certain data because of the data protection act, but what happens when things change? Walls do fall down, governments change, ideologies become overtaken. The data explosion will be immense, but only an open sourced egalitarian system will allow transparency and sharing of wealth and information. Many networks protect the entry and their content and too many have all content loaded to these database which belongs to dot dot dot ..(not you)

Uses of this information and data should allow rich new interpretations on the way our world is built, used, and designed.  Real new media landscapes or mediascapacities.

Text:  Stanza 2007

 

Capacities gets award in Digital Turku.

December 7th, 2010

Capacities was given an award in Digital Turku in Finland for 2011. This is more great news the whole installation will be on show for two  months some time next year.

stanza artist capacities

Image: Stanza Capacities.2010. Responsive data artwork.

About Capacities:  The real world is made virtual and the virtual is made real again and exposed in the process.

The whole gallery space becomes one large artwork made from real time city information and data. The aesthetic and feel of the space looks like an electronic city.  The city is made of units, grids, repetition , building blocks. In the gallery city called ‘Capacities’ the leads, the wires,and cables are incorporated into the artwork to look like a city map.’ Capacities’ looks “designed” like a piece of urban design, a city surveyed and controlled.

The whole space becomes a map to wander through.

http://www.stanza.co.uk/capacities/index.html

Another view:

stanza artist capacities

Image: Stanza 2010. Artwork Capacities.

THE ARTISTS STUDIO AS LABORATORY

August 2nd, 2010

THE ARTISTS STUDIO AS LABORATORY FOR THE FUTURE: “TRANSPARENCY”

I am developing the idea of studio as laboratory and extending previous versions by inviting members of the public to be involved in the process and the experiments. The studio will also have live CCTV broadcast and live data feeds.

Artists are like scientists they ask questions and find answers in peculiar ways….guided by research and process development.  Most artists, like scientists do stuff, they make things to question the world. They often speculate, researching difficult issues in a general direction in the way they see it with specific outcomes, these outcomes may or may not be art.

From the real to virtual and back to the real is a theme that has had my attention for five years and the idea is embedded in the works I am currently making.

stanza_i_am _stanza

Image: Stanza installation:- “Visitors To A Gallery” 2008. CCTV artwork.

This project will take place in the Barn at Lanternhouse, as Stanza creates data scapes in an Open Studio.  The residency is about exploring the artistic process, being transparent about the process and the development and production of new work.

The “open studio” mirrors the process of the project, with material and philosophical process being available to witness throughout.

stanza_visitors

Image: Stanza installation:- “Visitors To A Gallery” 2008. Installation on Floor.

This work (the studio as lab) is now in version three for my residency in Lanternhouse International (UK) called City of Dreams.

Three works to be developed during this City of Dreams residency: Info Below

  • Sonicity
  • Capacities
  • Open Studio: Transparency

http://www.stanza.co.uk/laboratory/index.html

Stanza Coded Reflex sandblasted onto mirror and hand painted.

March 4th, 2010
stanza

Image: Stanza artwork. Made in 1995 .Six feet diameter across approx .

Image of Stanza artwork.  Made in 1995 …..Six feet diameter across approx .

This work is sandblasted onto  mirror and hand painted.  It back  supported and ready to  hang.  Part of a series of works under the title, ” reflexity”.

See some more:

CCTV the new planned unrest as a result of economic policy.

November 11th, 2008

Police camera action, CCTV makes quite good TV.

Attacking and confronting the systems. CCTV makes a good memorial a document of our social reality, our neglect.  All those images of last seen here from Jill Dando, to Damilola Taylor, my Stars Of  CCTV….these images forever recorded before the bullet hits or the police charge.

But what use is it to contain and kettle, to lock down the people. The city is the people its for the people.

We are living in a cyber city, it could become a cyber prison, so should we just get used to it, should we just open up the system. We should do  something otherwise when the fight starts our children will suffer.

In 1994 John Major said, “No sympathy for civil liberties groups whatsoever”.  Quote from conservative local conference. CCTV sees a function creep extending its uses and purpose over time. But can we trust the technology.  We have become a society of endemic surveillance.

In the next  few years we  will see the seeds sown for endemic surveillance. The new investment from the police and councils can only  be for the new planned unrest as a result of economic policy.

These systems will be in place to track and monitor those who have “issues” and they  will have been paid for by you.

The we have nothing top hide culture will soon find out what they have “invested” in as this technology becomes embedded in the networked city. Seeing out children fight, be unemployed and spied upon….this will be our fault.

stanza world is watching

Image: Stanza. "The world is watching" Live CCTV artworks from around the globe. 2004

The above images is a canvas artwork  from the generative real  time system called  “The  World is Watching. It uses  live CCTV feeds from 1200 cameras from around the globe.

A global panoptican…only it should be transparent and open.

The seeds we are sowing will not reap  healthy rewards. This investment is blind.

Citysense passively “senses” the most popular places based on actual real-time activity and displays a live heat map.

June 18th, 2008
stanza image

Stanza Artwork. Shanghai 2004.

Here is the sales pitch from citysense. A system for gathering and representing real time city data from San Francisco. A nice idea for a company.
Quoted.
Citysense is an innovative mobile application for local nightlife discovery and social navigation, answering the question, “Where is everybody?”

Citysense shows the overall activity level of the city, top activity hotspots, and places with unexpectedly high activity, all in real-time. Then it links to Yelp and Google to show what venues are operating at those locations. Citysense is a free demonstration of the Macrosense platform that everyone can enjoy.

Instead, it evolves searching to sensing. Citysense passively “senses” the most popular places based on actual real-time activity and displays a live heat map.
Location data is everywhere. Cars, buses, taxis, mobile phones, cameras, and personal navigation devices all beacon their locations thanks to network-connected positioning technologies such as GPS, WiFi and cell tower triangulation. Millions of consumers and businesses use location-enabled devices for finding nearby services, locating friends & family, navigating, asset- and pet-tracking, dispatching, sports, games, and hobbies.

These forces have lowered the cost of technology, ignited interest in location-enabled services, and resulted in the generation of significant amounts of historical and real-time streaming location information. Sense Networks was founded on the idea that these datasets could provide remarkable real-time insight into aggregate human activity trends.

Macrosense employs patent-pending technology to learn from these large-scale patterns of movement, and to identify distinct classes of behaviors in specific contexts, called “tribes.”

Once it’s known which tribes are where, by sampling the distribution of tribes at any given place and time, it’s possible to understand what it means when a user is there at that place and time.

For example: rock clubs and hip-hop clubs each retain distinct tribal distributions. When a user is out at night, Citysense learns their preferred tribe distribution from time spent in these places. When that user visits another city, they see hotspots recommended on the basis of this distribution and combined with overall activity information.

Users who go to rock clubs see rock club hotspots, users who frequent hip-hop clubs see hip-hop hotspots, and those who go to both see both. The question “where is everybody like me right now?” is thus answered for these users – even in a city they’ve never visited before.

Citysense is an application that operates on the Sense Networks Macrosense platform, which analyzes massive amounts of aggregate, anonymous location data in real-time. Macrosense is already being used by business people for things like selecting store locations and understanding retail demand. But we asked ourselves: with all this real-time data, what else could we do for a city? Nightlife enhancement was the obvious answer. This release is just a test, and we’re interested in your feedback on how to make the application better. You’ll find a feedback button in Citysense.

Principles…

People should own their own data
People should have full control over the use of any data that they generate. All data collection should be “opt-in,” and users should be able to easily remove themselves and their data from the system without questions or hassle. The system doesn’t “remember” a user for later, but completely deletes data at the user’s discretion.

People should receive a meaningful benefit in exchange for sharing data
Meaningful benefits include compelling applications to help manage life better, or personalized services based on anonymous learning from “users like me.” People should be able to enjoy the benefits of these services simply in exchange for their data.

We’re looking for additional common good uses of aggregate, anonymous location data. If you would like to submit a project for consideration, please contact us at ….
http://www.citysense.com/home.php

All of the above ref their website.

From my Sensity projects.
Citysense…Sounds like sensity backwards….Various types of data can be re-imagined within the context of city space and the environment. This includes pollution data recorded via sensors in the street, to create audio acoustic files expressing the pain and suffering of the air as it pollutes. Weather and forecast data, acquired via weather station equipment; this can be used and can create ambient soundscapes and morphing visualizations as the wind shifts direction or the rain increases. Noise monitor levels, and noise maps , create a symphony of true urban sounds that can be used to make sound reactive sculptures. The patterns we make, the forces we weave, are all being networked into retrievable data structures that can be re-imagined and sourced for information. These patterns all disclose new ways of seeing the world. The value of information will be a new currency as power change. The central issue that will develop will be the privilege and access to these data sources….
I like their pitch about owning their own data, couldn’t agree more in fact all royalties should be shared. Its not just about privacy its about ownership. Once you enter the grid you body is now externally giving away data and information. Companies are now rushing to harvest this information , ( information services) making new products for mobile devices. I think we are going to see a lot of this.

“Gallery” by Stanza, is a dynamic public sculpture viewable over the internet.

May 28th, 2008

stanza Image

"Gallery” by Stanza, is a dynamic public sculpture viewable over the internet.

“Gallery” by Stanza, is a dynamic public sculpture viewable over the internet. Gallery describes the space, in this case the upper gallery in Plymouth Arts Centre, England. Made during an artist in residency project in situ in the gallery space during feb 2008.

The gallery interior has been made virtual and placed online. “Gallery”, is part of a series of process led experiments in data visualization within the context on an art gallery. This is an experimental engagement with data in the art gallery using sensors and CCTV. Stanza asks , “what happens during the process of visiting the gallery as a dataspace”; ie what happens to the gallery and what do the visitor do?

The sensors are used as real time recording devices to gather information about the sensory behaviour of the real space. The gallery becomes the artwork formed by the emergent real time data in the space.
The gallery laid bare as a work of art. Gallery proposes that the data is art. The art is a real time flow of the things around us that allow our senses to invoke understanding. The gallery space becomes the art described by the shifts in light, temperature and noises in the space over time.

http://www.stanza.co.uk/gallery/index.html

THE CENTRAL CITY NET ART PROJECT STANZA 1997

January 10th, 2008

THE CENTRAL CITY  website consists of over a dozen projects which have been in development since version one went online in 1997.

UK artist Stanza wins VIDA 6.0, 2003

www.thecentralcity.co.uk

THE INTERACTIVE CITY.

 The city allows you to experience different artwork depending on how you choose to navigate. There are also random ways to experience this. As well as this non linearity, some of the pieces change over time. Evolving pieces exist, that the “user” has to control to make them work, the user also can input changes of sound and picture.

This change in the relationship between the audience and the artist could be said to change our perception of the artwork. I am evolving a situation where the audience may not only participate but also by giving them some control, contribute to the form and content. The work is exploring this changing relationship between the audience and artist. The user makes the decision to change sounds and pictures, where to go, what to see, what to hear. This can be done by movements within the grid. This change in the relationship between the audience and the artist changes our relationship to the artwork. The user can choose what they experience, synthesising converging media, systems, and phenomena in the process

The Sensity flanuer. The patterns in the city

January 9th, 2008
OIl On Canvas by artist Stanza. Virus

OIl On Canvas by artist Stanza. Virus

While Baudelaire characterized the flâneur as a “gentleman stroller of city streets”, he saw the flâneur as having a key role in understanding, participating in and portraying the city. A flâneur thus played a double role in city life and in theory, that is, while remaining a detached observer. This stance, simultaneously part of and apart from, combines sociological, anthropological, literary and historical notions of the relationship between the individual and the greater populace.

This term refers to a person who plays a sensor role in understanding the urban environment.

Any pedestrian environment that accommodates leisurely exploration of city streets. Walter Benjamin adopted the concept of the urban observer both as an analytical tool and as a lifestyle….. making social and aesthetic observations during long walks. (From wikipedia)

The wrap it seems, is the collections of observations about the cityspace. These can be made into histories and documented, sights and sounds, experiences of the city.

 

“’Space has to be conceptualised in order to be experienced and understood, our ‘sites’ are informed by the predisposed character of our ‘sight’. The flaneur is a suitable metaphoric vehicle for the ‘witnessing’ of this space because ‘the flaneur moves through space and among the people with a viscosity that both enables and priviledges vision.’

Being a product of modernity, he was a spectator of modern life in the urban sprawl; now a product of post-modernity, the cyborg-flaneur is an androgynous spectator of virtual spaces. A person’s whose aim is to disappear in the spaces of the city – ‘a prince who is everywhere in possession of his incognito’ – is the person who has the best view of the basic nature of cyberspace, a space where anonymonity is maintained by a process of vaporisation upon departure.

The flaneur is also an ‘image of movement through the social space of modernity’ – an explorer who finds their identity among the realizations of the city. The cyber-flaneur’s exploration of virtual spaces is achieved through their natural propensity for movement; they wander anonymously within the boundaries of virtual space, developing a virtual identity while connected.” By Gaylene Barnes, OtagoUniversity, 1997.

 

I am exploring the patterns in the city from walks through technological observations. There are system loops from analogue to digital. In Sensity I am make the work virtual, visualizing the real city data and then representing it online, then making an installation city in the real world through display and leds. That’s is from real to virtual to real in a complex loop of assets.

Sensity has an agency it manifests sites and sounds of the real work expressing the stresses and senses of the real urban networked space.

On reflecting on recent surveillance based work I am also making systems with analogue and digital that appear the same. Uncovering the process of that exists in making the artworks.

“The Metropolis and Mental Life” by George Simmel.

“Man does not end with the limits of his body or the area comprising his immediate activity. Rather is the range of the person constituted by the sum of effects emanating from him temporally and spatially. In the same way, a city consists of its total effects which extend beyond its immediate confines.”

And maybe data doesn’t start or end inside the computer. There is bleed at the edges of the dataspace which are affected by the ‘agency’ of the participants. Environments change shape and patterns emerge as the flaneur move about.

Sensity: The online interfacing of live real time sensors networks allows a communication with environment, with real space in the present.

January 10th, 2006

Screen-Shot-2013-08-10-at-21.43.03dSensity: Environments. The ‘environment’ in these projects is created from a wireless multi nodal multi sensor network that is in place. The analogue is made digital and the digital can be formed into a variety of output devices.The flow of the data can be set to affect the behaviour of the output environment. The data environment that is created is a mapped on top of the space, a virtual data map or the real world. The environment is intelligent its just that we don’t know how to communicate with this space yet.

Within Sensity there is now a loop from the real to the virtual and back to the real. This notion of playing or manipulating with a malleable form (data) is made possible as each stream, each node, each sensor, or even the entire network can be communicated with using this xml online gateway.

We have seen rich shift in relational and responsive interactive works and the move away from gallery as a venue for art to the use of architecture and public domain space in the last twenty years.

In an age of global warming, so many artists are still using the architectural space as a coloured light bulb. As we burn more fossil fuels the light are flashing on and off.

Can Sensity be made more physical on output to represent of the growth of the city as an experience in the real world away from the screen. A city representation of the fabric of city space end the emerging patterns caused by these data flows.

An art city can be made where the data powers the wind turbines, the data changing the solar panels that change the lights. Loops of real time data change the meaning all the while changing the input and output which is (e)merging into a new space.

stanza image

Can Sensity be made more physical on output to represent of the growth of the city as an experience in the real world away from the screen. A city representation of the fabric of city space end the emerging patterns caused by these data flows.

stanza image