Archive for the ‘cctv’ Category

Surveillance State

February 6th, 2009

The proliferation of CCTV cameras and the growth of the DNA database were two examples of threats to privacy, the Lords constitution committee said.Those subject to unlawful surveillance should be compensated while the policy of DNA retention should be rethought. The government said CCTV and DNA were “essential crime fighting tools”.
“The huge rise in surveillance and data collection by the state and other organisations risks undermining the long-standing tradition of privacy and individual freedom which are vital for democracy,” Lord Goodlad added.
“If the public are to trust that information about them is not being improperly used, there should be much more openness about what data is collected, by whom and how it is used.” The government said CCTV and DNA were “essential crime fighting tools” but acknowledged personal data should only be used in criminal investigations where necessary.
“The key is to strike the right balance between privacy, protection and sharing of personal data,” a Home Office spokesman said.

“This provides law enforcement agencies with the tools to protect the public… while ensuring there are effective safeguards and a solid legal framework to protect civil liberties. Home Secretary Jacqui Smith has rejected claims of a surveillance society as “not for one moment” true and called for “common sense” guidelines on CCTV and DNA.

She recently announced a consultation on possible changes to the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act, under which public bodies can conduct covert surveillance and access data, to clarify who can use such powers and prevent “frivolous” investigations. The Conservatives said the government’s approach to personal privacy was “reckless”. “Ministers have sanctioned a massive increase in surveillance over the last decade, at great cost to the taxpayer, without properly assessing either its effectiveness or taking adequate steps to protect the privacy of perfectly innocent people,” said shadow justice secretary Dominic Grieve. Ref…http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics

The image below show the artist Stanza’s DNA on the outside of a building made public for all too see.

Copyright Image by Stanza

Portsmouth invests money in mother of big brother….

December 11th, 2008
Copyright Image by Stanza

Copyright Image by Stanza. From Stars Of CCTV Series of artworks.

Our social  agenda and relationship to city space is being driven,  “re-designed”; re engineered without thought by local councillors and policemen who are creating a society of mistrust. Haven’t they got something better to  spend money on , ie schools, education, buses  etc etc These guys just don’t seem to know what to  spend the council tax money on  so they keep  buying  and investing in CCTV.

Anti-social behaviour has become a familiar sight in some towns and cities across the country.

Now there’s a new weapon in the fight against it called Smart CCTV. Portsmouth City Council is the first, and so far only, local authority in the UK to try out the new system. It’s a computer programme that has been integrated into the city’s existing network of 152 cameras and has been programmed to spot unusual behaviour in places and at times when it’s not expected. For example, a speeding car being driven around an empty car park could be a joy rider or someone running through a deserted shopping precinct late at night might be a vandal.

When those and similar scenarios are ‘spotted’ by the software, using special parameters from programmers, an alarm is sounded which alerts CCTV operators to that particular camera.

It’s already been used in parts of seven cities across America, in places like New York and Washington DC, where the feedback has been positive. Nick Hewitson helped design the version Portsmouth City Council is using.

He said: “It filters out all the rubbish video that you don’t want and lets you see the stuff that you do want. “So you’re using human beings for doing what they do well, making subjective decisions on incomplete data.

“And using computers to do what they do well, process tonnes and tonnes of boring data.”

But not everyone in Portsmouth is as convinced by the new system as Ray Stead and Nick Hewitson.

Samilia Narcho, 19, told Newsbeat: “They are lurking a bit too much into people’s business. It’s a bit unfair on people who aren’t doing anything wrong. “It’s a bit too much invasion of privacy. Big Brother going a bit too far.”

But 18-year-old Chris isn’t worried about being watched. He said: “It doesn’t really bother me because I’m not doing anything wrong, so I’ve got nothing to worry about.” Berry, who’s 24, and 21-year-old Becky Pearson have different opinions on the new CCTV system. Berry said: “I think it’s pretty good because there are a lot of idiots in Portsmouth and they need to be kept under wraps.”

Becky added: “I can see why people think it’s a bit too much, with people being too watched.” The Smart CCTV technology is on trial in Portsmouth but if it proves successful, other UK cities could set up similar systems.

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So after the councils lost your money which was “invested” offshore in icelandic banks…now  they are investing in developing new software  for CCTV cameras. Basically Portsmouth is investing your money in mother of big brother….and the best sort of reporting the BBC  can come up  with is from chris  “But 18-year-old Chris isn’t worried about being watched. He said: “It doesn’t really bother me because I’m not doing anything wrong, so I’ve got nothing to worry about.”……either read a little history  or read a little science fiction  because I think there is plenty here to worry about Chris.

So the question is what sort of society do we want to live in twenty years?

Yes good idea lets go for the one where we don’t trust anyone at all, and have to monitor  everyone, everywhere, all the time…..brilliant idea….I wish I had thought of that.  But then again if I had a software company or CCTV system  I  would send my sales team be straight down to the local council to sell these idiots these systems too.

“Robotica­- Control inside the panopticon” by Stanza

November 11th, 2008
Copyright Image by Stanza

Copyright Image by Stanza: Robots making paintings. 2008.

A world premier of Stanza’s Robotica: Control inside the panopticon playful robot installation – with performative and interactive aspects – that questions ideas of surveillance and tracking in popular culture using, robots, CCTV and sensor technologies.

Twelve robots – each named after prison inmate numbers – roam freely on a canvas on the floor of the Gallery. These robotic prisoners are sent out across the canvas with small tasks to complete. This robotic “wandering” is captured over the evening onto the canvas. They create their own painting in their own little prison. The idea of the Panopticon originated with the English utilitarian philosopher Jeremy Bentham as a prison design that would allow an observer to monitor all the prisoners at all times, without any prisoner being aware of whether he was being monitored or not.Like people, robots have common behaviours and can be programmed accordingly i.e. robots can follow a path (path following mode), the can avoid obstacles (avoidance mode) and they can operate in wander mode. They all try to avoid one another – depending on their proximity to one another – while searching the space. In doing so they demonstrate social behaviour.

In moving through the gallery people create a ‘memory space’- a reference to a past created by the traces and paths left behind. The patterns we make, the forces we weave, reveal different ways of moving through the space. These patterns disclose new ways of seeing the world. All the robots are recorded via CCTV and each is made to wear CCTV which is shown on a monitor which also records the event. Police “tape” keeps the robots inside their controlled space. The robots mimic and trace the patterns people make – but based on algorithms. The robots are tracked – everything is watched and recorded – and unlike people their movements can be networked into retrievable data structures that it can be re-imagined and sourced for information. The digital patterns of the robots are re-made as analogue patterns. The robot path is in effect replaced with a series of ‘brushes’ – and it is these that are wandering around the canvas. A series of actions are applied to the movement of the digital brush across the rectangular canvas to create these robotic generative paintings.

This artwork investigates the relationship between the analogue and the digital aesthetic. The robots wander over the canvas to make the image – and this also protects the floor. The suggested canvas size 2.5 by 5m – and therefore a reasonable floor space is needed. All the robots will see the edges of the canvas and turn around automatically) i.e. they are roped off and will not go wandering off on their own!

CCTV the new planned unrest as a result of economic policy.

November 11th, 2008

Police camera action, CCTV makes quite good TV.

Attacking and confronting the systems. CCTV makes a good memorial a document of our social reality, our neglect.  All those images of last seen here from Jill Dando, to Damilola Taylor, my Stars Of  CCTV….these images forever recorded before the bullet hits or the police charge.

But what use is it to contain and kettle, to lock down the people. The city is the people its for the people.

We are living in a cyber city, it could become a cyber prison, so should we just get used to it, should we just open up the system. We should do  something otherwise when the fight starts our children will suffer.

In 1994 John Major said, “No sympathy for civil liberties groups whatsoever”.  Quote from conservative local conference. CCTV sees a function creep extending its uses and purpose over time. But can we trust the technology.  We have become a society of endemic surveillance.

In the next  few years we  will see the seeds sown for endemic surveillance. The new investment from the police and councils can only  be for the new planned unrest as a result of economic policy.

These systems will be in place to track and monitor those who have “issues” and they  will have been paid for by you.

The we have nothing top hide culture will soon find out what they have “invested” in as this technology becomes embedded in the networked city. Seeing out children fight, be unemployed and spied upon….this will be our fault.

stanza world is watching

Image: Stanza. "The world is watching" Live CCTV artworks from around the globe. 2004

The above images is a canvas artwork  from the generative real  time system called  “The  World is Watching. It uses  live CCTV feeds from 1200 cameras from around the globe.

A global panoptican…only it should be transparent and open.

The seeds we are sowing will not reap  healthy rewards. This investment is blind.

CCTV: ART HISTORIES.

July 1st, 2008

Video installation by Bruce Nauman.

Live Taped Video Corridor (1970)

http://bridell.com/tag/bruce-nauman/

In Live/Taped Video Corridor, you walk down a long, very narrow corridor. At the end of the corridor there are two monitors on top of each other. The lower one shows a video tape of the corridor, the upper one shows a live (CCTV) video of the corridor, shot from a camera at a height of about 3 meters, at the entrance of the corridor. The effect is that as you walk down the corridor, you see yourself from the back, and as you approach the monitor you get further away from the camera so you never really get any closer to “yourself”.

Corridor Installation (Nick Wilder Installation) 1971 consists of an inaccessible room and six corridors, three of which may be entered. Navigating these spaces we encounter a series of television monitors that relay our image taken by CCTV cameras. The positioning of the cameras is such that the information displayed on the monitors contradicts that of actual experience: we are left with a feeling of confusion and even isolation.

http://www.tate.org.uk/liverpool/exhibitions/nauman/guide/room4.shtm

To enter these works is to become a performer, yet at no time are we in control. Such are the spatial limitations that we can only make a limited number of responses, predetermined by the artist: ‘Whatever ways you could use it were so limited that people were bound to have more or less the same experiences I had.’ Viewed by some invisible authority, we become like rats in a cage, revealing generic patterns of human behaviour.

Vito Acconci, ‘Following Piece’ 1969

Vito Acconci, like Nauman, was also one of the first artists to really experiment with surveillance in his art. In Acconci’s ‘Following piece’1969, he took his surveillance to the streets and over the course of a month he closely filmed and documented the movements of anyone that happened to cross his path. Without the control and predictability of a gallery space, his films were documents of ‘real life’ as it occurred, and with them ranging from a few minutes to a few hours in length, it was an exaggerated exploration into the idea of ‘Big Brother is watching you’: it also analysed the intusion of personal space within a public area.

Julia Scher – ‘Security by Julia IX’ 1990. Julia Scher creates elaborate installations based around security and surveillance and invites the audience to become part of the work by playing the role of both the surveyor and the surveyed in her pieces ‘The Shurmann House’1991 and ‘Security by Julia IX’ 1990. By setting up cameras throughout the space, the viewers can look at themselves, watch others and wonder who could be looking at them in return.

Manu Luksch _ Faceless. ‘In a society under the reformed ‘Real-Time’ Calendar, without history nor future, everybody is faceless. A woman panics when she wakes up one day with a face. With the help of the Spectral Children she slowly finds out more about the lost power and history of the human face and begins the search for its future.

Chris Oakley

The Catalogue. ‘Placing the viewer into the position of a remote and dispassionate agency, observing humanity as a series of units whose value is defined by their spending capacity and future needs.’ http://www.chrisoakley.com/the_catalogue.html

Ann Stoddard makes interactive installations in which viewers are profiled via CCTV. These works explore how context can make viewers more aware of privacy and trust issues, less accepting of CCTV. At www.annstoddard.net, see: RANDOM SUBJECTS; Application Center, Waiting Room; Datapaint- Surveilling Utopia. My next show opens March 26th at the District of Columbia Art Center (DCAC), Washington DC. Please contact me at astoddard@net-site.com if you have questions, and to request images, a video-dvd, a press release, reviews. I hope to hear from you.

ctrl[space] : Rhetorics of Surveillance from Bentham to Big Brother. Edited by Thomas Y. Levin, Ursula Frohne and Peter Weibel (USAUK). The book was put together around an exhibition about surveillance organised from October 2001 to February 2002 at the ZKM, Centre for Art and Media in Karlsruhe (Germany). The art pieces are treated extremely well with plenty of photos and a text often written by the artists themselves.

Software to “hear” sounds.

June 25th, 2008

CCTV cameras which use artificial intelligence software are being developed to “hear” sounds like windows smashing, researchers have revealed.

University of Portsmouth scientists are working on adapting the software so it can also react to crowd noise.

Crimes would be captured on camera faster and response times improved.

The news comes after the BBC learned councils in southern England routinely used powers brought in to fight terrorism and crime to spy on people.

Figures obtained by BBC South showed the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (Ripa) was used more than 750 times by the councils in 2007/08. The new three-year surveillance study is being funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/hampshire/7471140.stm

http://www.port.ac.uk/aboutus/newsandevents/frontpagenews/title,79126,en.html

The research team is now working on using the same software to ‘learn’ sounds and react to them by swinging the CCTV camera towards in them at the same speed a person would turn their head if they heard someone scream, which is about 300 milliseconds.

Dr David Brown, director of the Institute, said: “The visual-recognition software will be able to identify visual patterns but for the next stage we want to get the camera to pivot if it hears a certain type of sound. So, if in a car park someone smashes a window, the camera would turn to look at them and the camera operator would be alerted.

“The longer artificial intelligence is in the software the more it learns. Later versions will get cleverer as time goes on, perhaps eventually being able to identify specific words being said or violent sounds. We are only listening for specific words associated with violence, not full conversations.”

The software behind this research uses fuzzy logic to identify certain visual cues and sounds. Dr Brown said: “In identifying sound we are looking for the shapes of sound. In the same way, if you close your eyes, you can trace the shape of a physical object and ‘read’ its profile with your hand we are developing shapes of sound so the software recognises them.

“The software will use an artificial intelligence template for the waveform of sound shapes and if the shape isn’t an exact fit, use fuzzy logic to determine what the sound it. For example, different types of glass will all have slightly different waveforms of sound when they smash but they will have the same generic shape which can be read using fuzzy logic.

“It’s a very fast, real-time method of identifying sounds.”

Surveillance artworks: experiments with realtime images.

October 22nd, 2007

stanza artist


Stanza artwork: Live CCTV online remixed in real time. 2004

Projects with tangible outcomes for the mobile infrastructures. Using CCTV to create emergent artefacts and new ways of seeing the city. In the UK there is one CCTV camera for every 14 people. If you are in London, you could be caught on camera up to 300 times a day. Westminster City Council in London have come up with a solution – CCTV cameras without wires, which broadcast their pictures back to base using the council’s new wireless network. The advantage a wi-fi network camera is the mobility.

The pilot scheme uses five discreet cameras to monitor people’s comings and goings in Soho Square. Wireless CCTV cameras make it easier for more and more cameras to be installed.

“Within the Soho Square we have a network of wireless LAN bridges providing blanket coverage throughout the square,” said Tim Hearn of Cisco Systems which is providing some of the technology. “Down the narrows streets, Greek Street and Frith Street, we have Wi-Fi pointing down those streets as well so they give us coverage down there.” So that’s a network of wireless LAN devices that we then plug into CCTV cameras, we provide access to mobile workers that will have laptops of mobiles working with them, or maybe some specialist devices. “We’re also linking into noise monitoring devices or other sensors,” he said. Sourced from the BBC website.

The city already has a recorded source of data, cctv is everywhere. Using data from cctv, artists can bring the outside inside. Selected feeds are collected from around the city in real time. These real time images can be fed into software systems where a series of specialised channels rework these images. The channels are always on, and always changing, a constant view of any city or environment evolving around the clock.

I have made a system or art project called ccityv which uses specially created software and technology to randomly engage any camera globally. The system can grab images from any source.

I have to extend this to network cameras in the Bristol area. It is now possible to go further and get everyone in Bristol to tell us where webcams and cctv systems are; we could also set up some of our own. We can then grab all this imagery and edit it rework it and manipulate it inside the software.

Using pdas we can also send users to find the cameras to be recorded and re-engage with the world of surveillance. This system can capture portraits to monitor, and we can use it to tell stories and narrative in the street that can come into the ccityv project. This allows a process to start whereby we can get the outside inside and the inside outside. Data maps can be set up using the mobile Bristol software so that users can find these cameras and put themselves in the pictures. Then when it is updated you would be updated into the archive online. So the public can have all sorts of fun with this. The public can use cameras to make narratives, take portraits, subvert the surveillance process etc.

My system is online and can be engaged with in the everyday use by anyone. Most importantly it is inside the gallery projecting onto display devices. Note this is in real time, it is also online (see urls below); see the date and time stamp on each one. Also if a camera does not load please wait and a new one will be found immediately. Sometimes cameras go offline. The first image to load is a ‘dummy’ image.

Stanza artworks using CCTV

URBAN GENERATION

http://www.stanza.co.uk/urban_tapestry/index.html

YOU ARE MY SUBJECTS

http://www.stanza.co.uk/i_spy/index.htm

http://www.thecentralcity.co.uk/ccityv/

http://www.stanza.co.uk

stanza cctv artwork

Stanza image of cctv artwork.

The results are like an online realtime vj system mixing CCTV  images from around the worlds in real time.

bristolglobe

Cloud of data in Bristol. 2003. Live data responsive system

Exhibition Title: Online—The Emergent City By Stanza.

July 6th, 2007

stanza_artist__webstanza artwork called globals

stanza image : artwork called globals 

List of works about Cities. This is a list of links to my online artworks about cities. I am looking for a curator to make an exhibition of this as well as an exhibition space for an offline show.

Exhibition Title: Online

The EmergentCity by Stanza

Control Series, (Paintings ) http://www.stanza.co.uk/art/play.html

New Decayed series. (Paintings) http://www.stanza.co.uk/art/shop/indexdecay.html

Memory Mapping (Drawings). http://stanza.co.uk/memoryweb/index.html

Conundrum. (video) http://stanza.co.uk/conundrum/index.html

Artitexture. (video wall) http://stanza.co.uk/artitexture/artitexture_pages/index.htm

The Central City (website)http://www.thecentralcity.co.uk/

Inner City (Touch Screen) http://www.thecentralcity.co.uk/innercity/index.html

Biocity. (Touch Screen) http://stanza.co.uk/touch/index.html

Photocities (website) http://www.thecentralcity.co.uk/photocity/index.html

Diversity. (Projection) http://stanza.co.uk/diversity/index.htm

Brilliant City film (Plasma) http://stanza.co.uk/cinedata/index.html

*Authenticity (Projected )http://stanza.co.uk/authenticity/index.html

*Urban Rythms ( plasma) http://www.stanza.co.uk/spain_cctv/index.html

Codified (plasma triptych) http://www.stanza.co.uk/codefied/stanza_f9.htm

Megalopolis (plasma) http://stanza.co.uk/megalopolis_web/index.html

Globals. (Projected). http://stanza.co.uk/global/index.htm

Earth, Wind, Fire, and Water. (screens )http://www.stanza.co.uk/chinashanghai/index.html

*Urban Generation , Installation http://stanza.co.uk/urban_tapestry/index.html

*You Are my Subjects http://stanza.co.uk/i_spy/index.htm

*Blue Skies (Small display)http://stanza.co.uk/blue_skies/index.html

*House (Projected) http://stanza.co.uk/house/index.html

*Sensity (Projected and installed) http://stanza.co.uk/sensity/index.html

*Soundcities. Online database…headphones booths to touch screen.

Soul. (large installation.http://www.stanza.co.uk/soul_globe/index.html

Work that need the involvement of space and community

Publicity( CCTV onto outside) http://stanza.co.uk/publicity/index.html

Public Domain ( Gving CCTV units away) http://stanza.co.uk/publicdomain/index.html

Soundcities. (Online database.) Workshop collecting sounds. The sounds of the city

Sensity (Installed version) http://stanza.co.uk/sensity/index.html

  • *Denotes live networked artwork therefore needs internet connection
  • Other works can be shown and exhibited locally
  • Also available are paintings, prints, drawing of maps, and slides (not online).

Also a selection of digital prints will be made up and shown.

What is needed for an offline gallery exhibition are computers, projectors , displays, works printed up framing and electronics. Plus exhibition infrastructure, transport and catalogue.

Art on spheres. Stanza 3d display globes with data and surveillance.

June 1st, 2007

I have for the past four years been trying to make a large scale display of live data in a globe screen; and I have made several works in this area. I first made this proposal to the Watershed in 2004 and developed several concepts and prototypes with them through my Clarks bursary.

stanza 3d globe

Stanza. Art on spheres. Stanza 3d display globes.

3D globe with live data. 2004.

This research was also followed through with my Nesta Dreamtime Award in 2004, and I also pitched it to the Nesta business unit to make a real globe in 2004 (to develop this as a display device) as part of my Nesta Dreamtime outputs.

stanza 3d globe

Stanza. Art on spheres. Stanza 3d display globes.

Pitch to Watershed to place data glove outside the media centre..image 2004…the pitch was made again in 2006, when I sent the proposal for SOUL on the globe.

As part of this research I looked at other 3d globes of which have appeared in the last five years such as Omniglobe and Pufferfish. Indeed Pufferfish now has a really nice 3d globe that they market as a display for trade fairs.

Stanza Image. cctv

Live CCTV. Stanza. Art on spheres.

Stanza image..live CCTV on Globe. Shown here at County Hall Pufferfish Globe. 2006

I was going to make my own globe at one stage in 2003 but didn’t have the money to pursue. I also was involved with BDS it its inception, ie as a director of BDS, when we made a globe in China by project images onto Armand’s Weather balloon which we took to China, which looked quite nice. (I subsequently left them and only worked with them for the brief period in China).

stanza image

Stanza image from China. We tried this experiment in China….on a large weather baloon. The image shows a live CCTV camera of mine, which was showing a picture from my house. 2003

stanza image

stanza image 2004

also this one showing live images from Mexico CCTV being hacked 2003. the image on the globe is the data and time stamp of the CCTV camera

I have subsequently developed some relations with Pufferfish to show work on a 3D globe which they developed. Indeed they where kind enough to let me test some work on their display.

stanza image

stanza image 2004. 3d Globes

Stanza image on Pufferfish display…live sensors from across the city showing live data in a real 3d globe, in this case the work Sensity. 2006

I cannot claim to own any patents on globe technologies unfortunately, however what all my ideas in this area have in common was a goal to make a 3d display technology and place it in an artistic context as a sculptural display.

Live CCTV

stanza image 2004. 3d Globes

LIVE CCTV for a globe hung above the city. 2004.

My artistic goal was much more focused on the nature and use of this technology.

So this for the past four years I have been researching the use of live data for art gallery use indoor and outdoes to make a piece of work from a fine art perspective ie for cultural use, that would appear as a 3d globe.

I have used live CCTV images, realtime news feeds and various forms of live data from my own sensor networks. Indeed the idea of “globe” was essential to my metaphor of a world full of data, and archive, a meta ball of information.

This process hasn’t been easy, as well as trying to develop prototypes for four years I having been applying for arts grants to install a 3d globe to show live data in an art gallery. I pursued this idea of a globe showing live data from a cultural perspective ie real time information from various sources so the whole piece becomes a data globe, a world focused on the nature of live data and information flow. I want this to be both an outdoor public sculpture but also a piece indoors in an art gallery.

stanza globe with live feeds

Stanza image 2004. 3d Globes

Stanza live feeds on globe. 2004

I had also applied to Space 4 gallery in Peterborough where they said yes to the idea. (They had agreed a one man show that subsequently fell through) Indeed their curator Lisa Helin made a bid to the arts council on my behalf…or rather she filled the form in only for it to be rejected in 2006, by London Arts.

I had also pitched the globe project to The Watershed where my original ideas were formed as part of a Clarks Bursary in 2004.

I also pitched this as Sunderland Winter Gardens where I came second in a shortlist process in 2006.

Series of Sketches for SOUL…live data in the city.

I was also recently approached by a consortium in the United Emirates about this concept but it fell through this was such a disappointment as they where planning a series of them.

I think it would be great at the Tate Gallery, Turbine Hall if it looked like this with live data in it.

stanza

stanza image 2004. 3d Globes

Amber Stanza in Turbine Hall…image shows live data (CCTV feeds from around the TATE on huge globe…

It would look like this…………………..

Links to my works on this…

2006: http://www.stanza.co.uk/sensity/index.html
2004: http://www.stanza.co.uk/micro_city/index.html
2004: http://www.stanza.co.uk/global/index.htm
2006: http://www.stanza.co.uk/soul_globe/index.html
2006: http://www.stanza.co.uk/biocities/index.html
2006: http://www.stanza.co.uk/newsfeeder/index.html

In short I am still trying to this, so if anyone wants to commission me get in touch.

As you might know if you read this Blog. I am the recipient of an AHRC research fellowship. The concept of displaying live data on unique technologies is also one of my listed outputs of my fellowship.

Indeed Helen Sloan of Scan and Gill Haworth and all at the Watershed Media centre are supporting me in my endeavour find galleries and public art spaces who are interested on exhibiting my work.

Proffesor Janis Jefferies at Goldsmiths is also helping look for outputs for this

If you are a gallery and you want to exhibit my work contact me.

All images on this page copyright Stanza

Stanza exhibited at The Aboa Vetus & Ars Nova museum as part of Digitally Yours Exhibition

March 21st, 2007

 

stanza_reality 041_white_above

I am showing Urban Generation at The Aboa Vetus & Ars Nova museum.

The Arts Council of Southwest Finland are organizing an international exhibition of digital art. The exhibition will be shown in the Aboa Vetus & Ars Nova museum starting 31st March until 13th May 2007. Several internationally recognised artists working digitally have been invited to take part in the exhibition, and their work will be exhibited together for the first time. The key theme of the exhibition is human approach to digital technology. While digitality is often seen merely as technology, Digitally Yours points out through the works exhibited that it is a significant part of our humane everyday life. They represent an audience who may not be familiar with contemporary art, but are very familiar with the digital world.

CONCEPT

Despite its mundane quality digitality is something that changes people. In this spirit Digitally Yours challenges existing conceptions of art by transforming the character of artworks as well as the roles of artist and spectator. Digitally Yours provides experiences, joy, participation and a great deal to reflect upon for a broad spectrum of audiences. Digitally Yours deals with the inevitable co-existence of people and the digital world. The exhibition maps the changes in life and art in a time that is characterised by the digitalisation of culture. The artists in the exhibition use digital technology, but with a critical attitude.

Within the arts, digitality creates a new type of community and collective participation that involves both those who create art and those who consume art. Digitally Yours makes the social character of the digital visible through art. Digital art makes people open their eyes and consider humane and geographical differences in an entirely new way.

I am showing this work:
Urban Generation: Multiple cameras are accessed randomly in real time to make an urban tapestry. What you see is an evolving, generative artwork. These images are from taken London, and they happen as you see them, in real time. The installation versions of this work can be presented in art galleries using projectors or plasma displays. This online artwork represents many realities that exist in city space. The observed real time surveillance society is re worked into a series of grids. This presents London to a global online audience. The data that you see is protected by the data protection act. Here it is re mixed into what you see, which is this online artwork that look like a filmic experience. First made in 2002 the work was recently re -tested and some technical issues have been ironed out for 2005.

Stanza questions systems and the ethics of The Control Space

December 8th, 2006

Stanza question systems and the  ethics of The Control Space

Up until recently this technology was mediocre at best. The concepts that fuelled this infrastructure seemed to lean to Orwell and the deployment of all CCTV has been paid for by and large using public money which could have been spent elsewhere (housing hospitals schools etc).

Stanza: Visitors To A Gallery. 2007. CCTV systems and ethics.

Stanza: Visitors To A Gallery. 2007. CCTV systems and ethics.

The question is, how are these new technologies being sold to government? Ie the hugely costly National Health database or ID cards schemes. In both cases new technologies sold largely untested. In so many cases new technologies are bought by ministers who don’t understand the technology.

How could they understand these implications of these technologies? They couldn’t understand that in the early days of CCTV most cameras would run out of tape and all of the rest would probably have such bad lenses that you couldn’t see anything anyway. However, it is their duty to understand the conceptual unpinning of the tech rather than how it works. And the conceptual underpinning seems to have been ignored, or if it hasn’t been ignored then this has gone on unchecked and un-monitored.

Rather like a bush fire, once one system had been put in place by one council; they all followed suite. None of them really checked to see how these systems actually worked or where evaluated. Plenty of people here have spent plenty of other peoples money fuelling a whole industry to watch us moving about just to spot a few criminals.) or has there always been a bigger picture , a master plan)

CCTV CCTV CCTV.  Stanza question systems and the  ethics of The Control Space

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Despite ten years of poor CCTV and stories of people getting attacked only to find CCTV systems not working, the powers that be, have stuck with this agenda and now the tech ( after huge development and investment) can read the time off your wristwatch. So know we have men sit in kiosks watching our movement through city space and software that can detect patterns on the flow, where you are going.

Now the technology has got interesting there are other considerations. The patterns we weave through our urban infrastructure can inform us about our urban and rural environment. But these systems should be used to watch people, we should trust our people. The premise of all this current deployment is mistrust. Ie these systems have been put in for the wrong reasons.

As much as people watch and vet criminal activity for employment in schools etc who is watching these people watching and monitoring these systems.

Certainly data bases of information are growing and expanding and in theory the public think there are hackers out there using sophisticated techniques to get access to data. By and large back doors are like all doors, most entry is done because the doors aren’t closed ie they are left open . The idea of thinking about back doors is to suggest that criminals are looking to leverage there way in ( although this my be the case ) it its too focused of the criminal misuse of collective data and not focused enough on what value the data give the collective.

 

There is far worse response it the collective abuse by the owners of these systems, this is what needs to be monitored Take the national DNA database which is owned by the forensic science department. Who owns this data, could it ever be sold. How else is the data being exploited? Who owns each individuals data, surely we each and all own the copyright to our own DNA. Why is the state taking our possessions, our DNA and re appropriating our data like another tax. Although they say they seek to protect us (ie the reason for collecting the data) how are they actually protecting my data? How do they seek to exploit ‘ property’ which is mine that has a value? Why do I feel abused?

More importantly in the systems data can be mined in ways that we cannot conceive. The development of new algorithms, data mining, and computer techniques can leverage and present new meaning from these systems in ways that we haven’t come close to guessing at. These new data sets can be exploited for corporate gain, even though the data belongs to the individual. This data can also be exploited to track patterns that we have spent the best part of the 20th C trying to avoid, ie totalitarian, iron curtains, Bent ham observation systems where everyone is spying on everyone.

For example lets get complicated and mix your tax records with patterns of spending from your credit cards, and your DNA type, mix this up with you mobile phone records and we can probably find for example any man of Irish decent who is married that might have bought a condom….or Muslim who travels regularly or….

The issue with most of this vulnerability of new technology is that most people who want to use it have no idea how to use it, or no idea that thing can always be used for others reasons. Example mobile phone for speech communication is now widely used as typewriter text editor for sending tested messages. This is just an example of a ubiquitous technology that goes to market and the people that brought it to market aren’t even aware what it might be used for. (I mean who would have guessed it)

Now with CCTV and chips and data mining of databases things are getting complex, without some ethical monitoring we will have no idea what is being sourced here and how its is being used and abused. Nor will we have any idea how this data is being shifted around, cross referenced and exploited by companies and governments never mind terrorists and criminals.

 

Stanza Art CCTV

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maybe the world is indeed full of criminals but by and large we shouldn’t baton down the hatches Let the data be made public, open it up…..not just one gate keeper. Everyone whose data is on the system should have access. Lets try another approach lets trust one another.

I believe we should remove the passwords. What is the point of just trusting a select few people we don’t know we should trust everyone. It’s surely better to trust everyone than to mistrust everyone which is the road we have taken.

I am researching data within cities and how this can be represented, visualized and interpreted. Data from security tracking, traffic, and environmental monitoring can all be interpreted as a medium to make artworks. I investigate new ways of comparing, conceptualizing and then visualizing complex concepts related to the relationship of emergent data and real space in the built environment. In all my work I try to exploit the changing dynamics of city life as a source for creativity and create meaningful artistic metaphors. I utilize new technologies and integrate new media artworks into the public domain as part of this ongoing research into the visualization of city space. In essence I am researching data as a medium for creativity and how meaningful experiences of our cities may result. By investigating these data structures I aim to create new metaphors relevant to the experience of the city. The patterns we make, the visual and imaginative interpretations we give to real world events, are already being networked into retrievable data structures that can be re-imagined and source for information. These patterns disclose new ways of seeing the world. The value of gathering and re-presenting this data in artistic form, and then analyzing its impact and influence, lies in making meaning accessible to a wider audience.

I have a number of related artworks on my that you might find of interest….please go and have a look.

Here are four below.

Genomixer …….an open source DNA database….http://www.genomixer.com

Urban generation…… http://www.stanza.co.uk/urban_tapestry/index.html

Sensity artworks are made from the data that is collected across the urban and environment infrastructure. http://www.stanza.co.uk/sensity/index.html

Publicity. All the resulting data from a cctv network is projected over the building so that the outside of the building becomes a huge display network. http://www.stanza.co.uk/publicity/index.html

regards

Stanza


Stanza: Surveillance and Data Visualisations.

May 9th, 2006

A further selection of artworks from the Parallel Reality Series. They depict events captured from live networked surveillance systems. These works are located within the theme of privacy and surveillance. Surveillance “involves the collection and analysis of information about populations in order to govern their activities. Stanza writes “the patterns we make, the forces we weave, are all being networked into retrievable data structures that can be re-imagined and sourced for information. These patterns all disclose new ways of seeing the world.” The artworks are made using custom made computer software using digital techniques developed by Stanza. Each picture contains thousands of surveillance based images using a system that captures and then manipulate the images over selected periods of time. Some images represent an hour of time, some are overnight and some show weeks.

Stanza London CCTV Media Visualisation 2005

Stanza London CCTV Media Visualisation 2005.

Stanza Los Angeles CCTV Media Visualisation 2005

Stanza Los Angeles CCTV Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Stanza: News feeds Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Stanza: News feeds Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Stanza: CCTV  Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Stanza: CCTV Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Stanza: CCTV  Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Stanza: CCTV Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Stanza: CCTV  Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Stanza: CCTV Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

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Surveillance Cultures . The central issue that will develop will be the privilege and access to these data sources.

November 14th, 2005

In essence London is the biggest TV station in existence. Millions of hours worth of data are recorded every day by these cameras on city TV. One can take the sounds and images off live web streams and re-represent them thus creating new interpretations of the city in the process. The increase of technology infrastructure in the daily existence of a city means that technology will, more than ever be everywhere in our environment. Mobile data mining will be part of the fabric of the landscape. We will be carrying this data in pods, phones and IDS cards. ballin-bristollaserEverything is or will be tracked. CCTV, car sensors, tracking inside our phones and id card movement tracking in the guise of anti- terror activity.

The patterns we make, the forces we weave, are all being networked into retrievable data structures that can be re-imagined and sourced for information. These patterns all disclose new ways of seeing the world. The value of information will be a new currency as power change. The central issue that will develop will be the privilege and access to these data sources.