Archive for October, 2016

Exhibition in Ghent Belgium at Zeebrastraat

October 15th, 2016

Stanza is presented at New Technological Art Award (NTAA), an international art competition of the Liedts-Meesen Foundation which is part of the biennial update of Zebrastraat. The exhibition update_6 / NTAA 2016 will take place from November 5th to December 4th, 2016 at Zebrastraat Ghent and the Centre for Fine Arts Brussels, Belgium.

Stanza art

The 19 nominated works were selected by an international jury: Head of the jury Martin Honzik (Head of Department Prix/Festival Ars Electronica) together with Peter Weibel (Director, ZKM Karlsruhe), Jean-Marie Dallet (Artist, research professor at the Université Paris 8), Liedts-Meesen Foundation, Stef Van Bellingen (Consultant for Zebrastraat – Artistic leader of WARP), Paul Dujardin (CEO & Artistic Director BOZAR), Nick Ervinck (Artist, winner of the update_2 public award), Alain Thibault (Artistic Director of Elektra), Edwin Carels (Curator New Media exhibitions), Karen Helmerson (Program Director for Electronic Media, Film & Visual Art at the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA)) and Ralph Dum (Scientific officer and senior expert of the European Commission).

Stanza art

 

Exhibition In Scotland At Centrespace at the Visual Research Centre Dundee

October 15th, 2016

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NEoN, now in its seventh year,  will feature The Nemesis Machine – From Metropolis to Megalopolis to Ecumenopolis. Date – 9th – 30th November 2016

The internet of things meets a smart city head on in The Nemesis Machine is a large installation which is adapted to each place where it is displayed.  The artwork represents the complexities of the real time city as a shifting morphing and complex system. It visualises life in the metropolis on the basis of real time data transmitted from a network of sensors.

The artwork you see is a city of electronic components that reflect in real time what is happening. Small screens show pictures of the visitors so that they become part of the city. The artwork lies within the themes of the urban landscape, surveillance culture, privacy and connected city spaces.

The artwork also explores new ways of thinking about life, emergence and interaction within public space. The installation goes beyond simple single user interaction to monitor and survey in real time the whole city and entirely represent the complexities of the real time city as a shifting morphing complex system.

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My wireless sensor network is set up to “visualize” the space all around us as ‘worlds’ full of data. These new data-spaces can help us understand the fundamentals of our outside environment.  The age of privacy is over. Imagine walking out the door, and knowing every single action, movement, sound, micro movement, pulse, and thread of information is being tracked, monitored, stored, analyzed, interpreted, and logged. The world we will live in seems to be a much bigger brother than the Orwellian vision, it is the mother of big brother.

 

 

 

Exhibition in Canada at New Media Gallery Vancouver.

October 15th, 2016
Surveillance based artworkThe Agency at the End of CIvilization

A sprawling collection of daisy-chained monitors, watchful orbs and speakers give voice to circulating, machinic narratives. The Agency at the End of Civilization, by British artist Stanza, presents a parallel future-present that combines real-time data with false narratives. In this world we are under constant surveillance; we are watched in precise detail, our movements are interpreted by machines. Yet the interpretation of what we are seeing and hearing becomes increasingly uncertain. The work links real video and information from hundreds of CCTV cameras in the south of England . Aligned to this are millions of car number plates from the UK car number plate recognition system (The Internet of Cars Project). Using predictive software the machine collects what it is seeing in real time, then begins to insert false narratives to create its own version of reality. The work speaks to our control of public space and our trust in technology.

 

WITNESS

Originally the word Witness meant knowledge, in the sense that you must see, observe or know by personal presence. Over time it became understood as a means of establishing identity and thus the notion of the eye-witness was established: one who testifies to what they have perceived through their senses; tasting, touching, hearing…and seeing. The seeing, witnessing machine, is something that has been imagined and alluded to for centuries. This exhibition contemplates the seeing machine.

Surveillance based artwork

There are five works of art in this exhibition. Each sets up an interplay between the perceiving machine, the world that is perceived by the machine and we, who are both perceiving + perceived bodies. A symbiotic relationship is formed between organic and non-organic systems. There are many ways of seeing. One process of controlled watching is surveillance; a monitoring of behavior for the purposes of influence, discipline, protection or control. It has been said that surveillance is as old as civilization itself. In this exhibition we encounter deeply coded, multi-layered processes of seeing, recognition and surveillance.

Machine vision can often outperform humans. Like humans, machines can distinguish light from dark. They form visual images. They understand their surroundings and have knowledge of the world. They follow our movements, predict our behavior, captivate us and bond with us. Perhaps more importantly we bond and enable them. This exhibition allows us to imagine futures and recall why sight developed.

Surveillance based artwork