We are all becoming victims of the control state.

October 16, 2008 by stanza Leave a reply »
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Stanza.  Artwork

Stanza. Artwork

Jacqui Smith leads us down the path of total state control. (haven’t we been there before). Some more research needs to be done in this area, and the total lack of creative debate speaks volumes about this inept direction the ID, data, dna, CCTV society is moving.

Its time for a full scale review and creative think tank should be set up, to analyse use of new technologies, data mining, and misuse / abuse of technology. The police should stop setting the agenda. The public are not criminals, people on the buses are not criminals, our children are not criminals. We have are becoming victims of the control state.

Things change. There will always be danger in big cities, lets face it millions of people live in them. But the idea is that its fun to live and be in big places, not oppressive.

Where will it end when we are forced to carry id cards with rfid that trace all our habits, movement and views and earnings. Where will it end, when we have systems in place that cannot be removed, ( DNA searches, CCTV everywhere, government controlled banks, all phone calls recorded, mobile phone tracing our movement). Well for sure if we trust the government no problem. But governments change , not only that but ideologies change. And worse, businesses get sold. With governments outsourcing many of these databases like our utilities, these new data assets could be run by agencies in other lands.
From BBC below

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/7671046.stm

Details of the times, dates, duration and locations of mobile phone calls, numbers called, website visited and addresses e-mailed are already stored by telecoms companies for 12 months under a voluntary agreement.

Far more widely-used are powers to track a suspect’s telephone calls, texts, e-mails and internet use, to find out whom they’re communicating with, how frequently they’re in touch, and in the case of the internet, what websites they’re visiting.

This does not involve viewing or listening to content.

‘Vital tool’

This information – known as “communications data” – is held for billing and business use by telephone companies, communications firms and internet service providers.

The data may also include other details, such as the time a message or e-mail was sent, and the location from which calls are made.



There are clearly considerable civil liberty concerns and privacy issues which will need to be overcome for any new scheme to get off the ground.

Under legislation, law enforcement agencies can request access to communications data – the companies involved are obliged to hold on to it for 12 months. It’s a vital tool for police and the security and intelligence services – and not just for terrorism and serious crimes.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7671759.stm

The data can be accessed by the police and security services on request – but the government plans to take control of the process in order to comply with an EU directive and make it easier for investigators to do their job.

Information will be kept for two years by law and may be held centrally on a searchable database.

Without increasing their capacity to store data, the police and security services would have to consider a “massive expansion of surveillance,” Ms Smith said in a speech to the Institute for Public Policy Research earlier.

Data about use of telephones, internet and e-mails would be channelled to one central point, but the database would not store the content of people’s messages or calls.

Another possibility is that internet service providers and communications companies would be given some government funding to improve the way they collect and store data.

No decisions have been taken yet. There are clearly considerable civil liberty concerns and privacy issues which will need to be overcome for any scheme to get off the ground.

But counter-terrorism officials have warned that there is no time to lose. “The ground is shifting under our feet,” said one.

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The ground is “shifting” indeed. To a society based on mistrust where we are stopped getting off the bus daily to have bus passes checked by hundreds of waiting police. Our children are monitored in schools, they are being stopped daily and searched ( not hundred of times but over 2000,000 searches last year alone and the police want more.

I think its always a fair point when people say its ok I have nothing to hide. However badly trained police often traumatise young people with these searches. Face down on the floor surrounded by armed police, must nt be fun if your sixteen. This is not uncommon as one sixteen year old recently found out. So my point; imagine if this was your child, how would you feel, or imagine if it was you. So all you people saying its ok for more dna test, id card, cctv , and police searches you have to ask what sort of society are we be led into.

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Lib Dem home affairs spokesman Chris Huhne said: “The government’s Orwellian plans for a vast database of our private communications are deeply worrying.”

Errr..is that all you got to say.
“Ministers claim the database will only be used in terrorist cases, but there is now a long list of cases, from the arrest of Walter Wolfgang for heckling at a Labour conference to the freezing of Icelandic assets, where anti-terrorism law has been used for purposes for which it was not intended.” “Our experience of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act suggests these powers will soon be used to spy on people’s children, pets and bins.

“These proposals are incompatible with a free country and a free people.”

But Information Commissioner Richard Thomas said “lines must be drawn” to defend “fundamental liberties”.

Later he told BBC Radio 4’s World at One: “I’m not saying it’s right or wrong but I think there should be absolute full transparency.”

This is a great quote, talk about hedging your bets.
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So who is actually listening here. By setting up a think tank it could explore this notion “full transparency”, and what it means.
from

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/7671046.stm
The government’s own reviewer of anti-terror laws, Lord Carlile, said: “The raw idea of simply handing over all this information to any government, however benign, and sticking it in an electronic warehouse is an awful idea if there are not very strict controls about it.”

Shadow home secretary Dominic Grieve, said the government’s record on protecting data was “appalling” adding: “Putting all this data into the hands of the government will threaten our security, not make it better.

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Putting this information into the hands of any government will threaten our personal long term security, although its possible true the state itself might well be protected more by all this control. One has to understand the technology and the way it can be abused.

So the question is why the sudden mis- placement of trust in society and the current need and belief in technology to combat crimes.

This whole debate is between the police and wrongdoers and its now directing policy, energy and money.

Stanza painting Control. 1989. Oil On Canvas

Stanza painting Control. 1989. Oil On Canvas

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