Posts Tagged ‘data’

The Third Space a multi layered city of informational data.

June 29th, 2017

 What you see in the artworks are fused layers of city patterns in the form of hybridised hacked maps. These lines, grids, and shapes form the design of the city.This series of artworks represents maps as the drawings and patterns that we make and leave behind on the landscape. The artworks represent the scars on the landscape that we have created into by our actions. The cities we inhabit disclose our behaviour in these systems. Exhibited at Brugges Museum. 2015. What you see in the artworks are fused layers of city patterns in the form of hybridised hacked maps. These lines, grids, and shapes form the design of the city.

In thinking and making these work, various other things start to be played out.  The concepts of the city of noise,  the control city of data, the living breathing city space. Within the series some also merge city data with other cities to create what I term The Third Space a sort of confused multi layered migrant city.  These images also play on the relationship of scale with the micro and the macro . Here is the city as living organism;  it’s alive, ever moving towards the edges of space, alive in a virThe Surface Skin 100-100cm. by Stanzaal sense.

New Commission For Watermans Arts Centre Artwork by Stanza using live surveillance images.

December 5th, 2013
Originally made in 2004 using director now available as an app. Specially  commissioned  by Watermans Arts Centre.

Originally made in 2004 using director now available as an app. Specially commissioned by Watermans Arts Centre.

 

Bus On Fire By Stanza 2011

Bus On Fire By Stanza 2011 C print on aluminium

Originally made in 2004 using director now available as an app. Specially  commissioned  by Watermans Arts Centre.

Originally made in 2004 using director now available as an app. Specially commissioned by Watermans Arts Centre.

Originally made in 2004 using director now available as an app. Specially  commissioned  by Watermans Arts Centre.

Artwork by Stanza using live surveillance  images. The software system mixes live networked feeds over time and allows different results to be made depending on use of the interface.  This software art various filters and fields and allows: Choice of camera. Time for each segment.  Slice horizontal or vertical.

Stanza. http://www.stanza.co.uk

Underpinning these artworks, are a whole series of potential problems about observation, surveillance, and the ethics of the control space. Imagine walking out the door, and knowing every single action, movement, sound, micro movement, pulse, and thread of information is being tracked, monitored, stored, analyzed, interpreted and logged

Stanza On The Front Row BBC radio 4 Talking about Big Data

September 4th, 2013

Stanza On The Front Row BBC radio 4 Talking about Big Data.

Thu, 29 Aug 13 Big Data art– the artists who find inspiration in big data….on the front row bbc radio 4.

http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/radio4/frontrow/frontrow_20130829-2000a.mp3

Artwork By STanza

British artist Stanza wins SHARE PRIZE 2012 in Torino for Capacities. A piece of work using real time data of the city.

November 1st, 2012
The British artist Stanza  wins SHARE PRIZE 2012 in Torino for Capacities. A piece of work using real time data of the city. This artwork captures the changes over time in the environment (city) and represents the changing life and complexity of space as an emergent artwork. Its an artwork about the internet of things, smart cities and connecting spaces.
British artist Stanza In Italy

Jury Statement

What is the role of art today, in this moment of social transition towards the city of the future? It was from this perspective that the artists interpreted the theme Open Your City, exploring the key concepts word by word. The short-list of the Jury reflects the reappearing artistic interpretation of the modern urban landscape as system, where the solid element is replaced by the message, the information and the database, a real, but dematerialized city. Artists have been short-listed by an international jury, consisting of Simona Lodi, Carlo Ratti, Bruce Sterling and Mirjam Struppek, on the basis of the artistic value of their work and its relevance to the Share Prize theme.

Capacities: Real Time Complex – Connected Cities by British artist Stanza is an installation dedicated to the complexity of life in an environment. Changes in each of the spaces are monitored in real time, as they give rise to constant tensions, highlighting the behaviour of complex systems and the emergent properties that appear. In this case the organism is the city and not the single individual; it is the entire urban habitat as a whole, revealing its nature as a multifaceted system. The installation is the real-time mirror image of everything that changes, gathering huge amounts of data that are transformed aesthetically into a physical copy of the city, made up of cables, lights and sensors that represent shifts in environmental parameters measured numerically. The obsessive focus is on the observation of environmental data by gathering measurement on temperature, light, atmospheric pressure, noise and the sounds of the city outside the museum. Gathering digital data on the environment has become an art, and art has become a data set rather than a collection of molecules. The short-list of the Jury reflects the reappearing artistic interpretation of the modern urban landscape as system, where the solid element is replaced by the message, theinformation and the database, a real, but dematerialized city.

Le parole OPEN YOUR CITY sono la traccia tematica che ha guidato la mostra di Share Prize. Il premio ha come obiettivo scoprire, promuovere e sostenere le arti in epoca digitale. La selezione delle opere finaliste della mostra è dedicata agli artisti che interpretano l’innovazione come linguaggio di espressione artistica, in ogni modo e forma. Una giuria internazionale composta da Simona Lodi, Carlo Ratti, Bruce Sterling e Mirjam Struppek hanno scelto gli artisti in base all’aderenza al tema e al valore estetico dell’opera.

Dichiarazione della giuria

Quale è il ruolo dell’arte, in questo momento di transizione sociale verso la città del futuro? In quest’ottica gli artisti hanno interpretato il tema Open Your City, sviscerando le parole chiave. La short-list della giuria riflette l’interpretazione del riapparire artistico del paesaggio urbano moderno come sistema, dove l’elemento solido è sostituito dal messaggio, dalle informazioni e dai database, una città reale ma smaterializzata.

Capacities: Real Time Complex – Connected Cities dell’artista inglese Stanza dedica la sua installazione alla complessità della vita in determinato ambiente. Ogni ambiente è sottoposto a cambiamenti continui che sono monitorati in tempo reale. I cambiamenti portano continua tensione e stressano il concetto di linearità ed evidenziano le emergenze che compaiono. In questo caso l’organismo è la città e non il singolo cittadino ma l’intero complesso urbano, tracciandone il profilo come sistema multiforme. L’installazione è lo specchio in real-time di ciò che si modifica, raccogliendo grosse quantità di dati trasformati esteticamente in una copia della città ma fatta di cavi, luci e sensori che esprimono il passaggio degli elementi ambientali raccolti in forma numerica. L’attenzione insistente è osservare i dati ambientali raccogliendo la temperatura, la luce, la pressione atmosferica, il rumore, e il suono della città fuori dal museo. Raccogliere elementi numerici che riguardano l’ambiente è diventata un’arte e l’arte e’ diventata un insieme di dati piuttosto che un insieme di molecole.

http://www.stanza.co.uk/capacities/index.html

 

 

Stanza exhibits city wide data installation Verenigd Koninkrijk, Capacities. Update_4. Gent.

September 24th, 2012

Welkom op de website van de New Technological Art Award 2012, een internationale kunstwedstrijd van de Stichting Liedts-Meesen die deel uitmaakt van onze biënnale Update. Kom kijken naar het werk van de genomineerden van 22 september tot en met 18 november 2012.

Stanza, Verenigd Koninkrijk, Capacities

Locaties:
Zebrastraat – Zebrastraat 32/001 – 9000 Gent – Belgium – www.zebrastraat.be

New Technological Art Award 2012, een internationale kunstwedstrijd van de Stichting Liedts-Meesen In 2012 organiseert de Stichting Liedts-Meesen Update_4 in het kader van het project Zebrastraat en in navolging van de eerste drie Update-biënnales.

In Update_4 wordt de filosofie van de vorige edities behouden maar leggen we nieuwe accenten. In het verleden gingen de tentoonstellingen gepaard met de New Technological Art Award Liedts-Meesen die meer en meer op de belangstelling van de kunstenaars en het publiek kon rekenen. Onze focus ligt nu op de presentatie van deelnemers van de wedstrijd NTAA en bestaat uit:

-een grotere bijdrage van nieuwe technologieën in de kunst
-een verhoging van het aantal genomineerden van 10 naar 20
-een presentatie van één naar drie locaties in België : de Zebrastraat in Gent, La Cambre en iMAL in Brussel

Uit de meer dan 300 inzendingen waarvan 20 kunstwerken geselecteerd werden, vallen een aantal typerende thema’s te traceren. Ondanks het feit dat onze dagelijkse perceptie in een grote mate gedomineerd wordt door virtuele werelden en onder invloed staat van de eigentijdse technologie, kunnen verschillende werken onder het landschappelijk genre gecategoriseerd worden. Opvallend is evenwel de verwerking van diverse parameters die het kunstwerk via een technische transfer veranderlijk en de beleving ervan multisensorisch maakt. Mapping betekent in deze context niet zozeer een cartografische variant, maar includeert eveneens het flaneren, cruisen of dwalen. In een gegeven geografie vertaalt zich dit vaak in een (mechanische) choreografie waarin parameters als licht en geluid expressief gemanipuleerd worden. De luciditeit in een aantal werken kent een tegengewicht in de reflectie over eindigheid, dood en in een enkel geval opent dit zich cynisch en hyperbolisch tot het contemporaine euthanasiedebat. Items als identiteit en communicatie vormen een belangrijk inhoudelijk substraat waarin gegevens als sociale netwerken, privacy, hacking, spam verwerkt worden. De interactiviteit bij vele inzendingen doet een beroep op een actieve toeschouwer die zich vaak geconfronteerd ziet met keuzemogelijkheden of beslissingen die men dient te nemen.

Stanza artwork Capacities

 

Art that explores questions raised by modern society – about privacy, surveillance culture….

September 23rd, 2012

STANZA’s art explores questions raised by modern society – about privacy, surveillance culture, and who owns the data that is regularly collected about all of us – often using modern technologies to create his pieces. Since he first started exhibiting his works in 1984, STANZA has strived to create cutting edge art that deals with current issues. In the process he has won several impressive awards, including an AHRC arts fellowship, and has seen his work featured in over 50 different exhibitions globally.

Ahead of a installation of one of his works “Capacities” in Ghent, Belgium in September, Solomon Radley met with him, in front on a computer monitor at his studio in South London, to talk in depth about what he does over coffee.

Hey, how’s it going? Would you begin by telling me a bit about what you do?

STANZA: The things that I’m interested in are ‘surveillance space’, which is the idea of the city as having become a panopticon – this idea that we’re in a prison and we can be observed at all times, from all perspectives, all at once, and particularly in real time.

I use various technologies to do that, like CCTV and wireless sensor networks. Over the years, firstly I’ve developed a strong understanding of what these technologies can do in terms of learning about them, but also I’m having to develop for them, so I’ve learned how to develop hardware and software. You may think I’m a technologist – I see myself as a creative technologist, and I also see that artists are engineers, so they have to understand the technologies that they use, and the mediums that they use in order to get output.

To bring that into perspective, we can look at some artworks…

Sure thing. Would you expand on your thought that the city is a sort of prison?

STANZA: Urban Generation is a piece I did in relation to this idea of the city being a panopticon. Let’s say, in modernist terms, an artist would go out and collect assets – he might use a recording device or a camera – it would be a still, linear asset, and it would never change. It’s possible to actually conceive of the city as a moving physical entity, moving forward in time all the time. How is it possible to use new technologies to actually gain a representation of this, and use it in a culturally meaningful way?

Urban Generation attempts to imagine the world from everyone else’s perspective all at once. If I’m giving a talk, what I try and do is – to illustrate the conceptual shift – I say: “I’d like you to close your eyes, and I’d like you to imagine yourself in a place in London. I’m going to do the same and I’m going to take a single mental snapshot, and I’d like you all in the room to take your single snapshot. Now, I’d like you to imagine the view of the people sitting next to you to your left and to your right, so you have three images multiplied together. There’s 300 people in the room; I’d like you to merge all of these 300 images together. And now not like a film, (because if we used a film we’d be recording the same images) what I’d like you to do is to move these images forward in real time.”

This is the idea I’m trying to capture with this piece of work.

A lot of your work is concerned with the question of who owns the information that is regularly collected about people, and with re-claiming that information. Tell me about this idea.

STANZA: I make artworks that arise from my research into these themes – the themes being ‘control space’ and ‘surveillance space’ and issues with privacy. What I’m doing, which is sort of new ground, is that I’m hacking access to a network and re-appropriating the data and information, and I’m re-contextualizing to give it a wider meaning. I want to show that you can do something positive with this data.

Other works where I’m interested in the control and ownership of data include this website called GenoMixer, where I fully sequenced my blood. In a sense this looks like artist self-portraiture, but I was interested in thedomain space – the public domain space – that’s inside our bodies.

We have this huge line of code – 3.3 billion letters – and it basically has an economic value. The proposal here is to IPO (Initial Public Offering) the project on the stock market, and to give everyone a share of the derivable intellectual royalties. For example, if somebody else wanted to investigate your DNA in a medical program they’d have to pay you. If some other company discovered the cancer gene because you were on the police forensic database you could say “No it’s copyrighted – it’s on the GenoMixer database”.

It just so happens that I also made a series of self-portraits with them…

One of the most obvious types of information that is commonly collected about the general public is video images gathered by CCTV, and this is something you often look at. What are your thoughts about CCTV?

STANZA: Let’s look at “Urban Generation – trying to imagine the world from everyone else’s perspective, all at once“. What we’ve got here is: each square on this four-by-four grid is making calls to over 100 cameras in London in real time. This is a parallel reality, using live network data to re-appropriate it over the network and use it for something else. For example, this could be used as an extension on landscape painting.

Why this has become quite interesting, and the reason I mention these modernist aspects that are fixed, is that this work is never the same. You could look at it even now, on a different monitor, and it would be different: It’s not the Mona Lisa – where every time you look at the work you experience the same thing – there’s an added problem here.

Another interesting question here is: Is what we’re looking at the artwork? On July 7th in 2005 they switched this entire network off because of the terrorist attacks. Well my system still worked, it’s just that the output – which is what connects a viewer to the system – is shifted.

This [Public Domain Responsive Architecture Facade] is the same concept using CCTV, observing the whole of the city but making it transparent. Why would you want to make your movements open and transparent? Why would you want to let CCTV be seen by everybody? This is a building with its outer surfaces displaying images that are embedded in the city – all the stuff on the outside of the building is shifting in terms of the real time properties of that city. In a sense, you (as the observed individual) become part of the building and part of the city, and this opens up the idea of transparent architecture and transparent space.

Public Domain is another work along the same theme, where I gave CCTV cameras away to members of the public, to open up this idea of CCTV networks. People sometimes say that they’ve got nothing to hide, and to nothing to fear…I think that’s a problematic statement. I’m not coming down on a particular side of the fence here, but it seems to me that we’ve opened Pandora’s box, and there’s a whole series of legislative and ethical issues that aren’t being addressed.

Hopefully what I’m doing in these artworks is to draw attention to the fact that there’s a whole series of potential problems that we’re walking in to.

You also play with collected data, which you use to create interactive works or installations where real-time changes are caused by environmental factors…

STANZA: We’ve already looked at my CCTV system. There’s another one, which uses wireless sensors/wireless nodes. You scatter them across the city, and they talk to each other in a network grid.

This research started in 2004 as a result of an AHRC grant that I was awarded, and I was trying to find a system I could use as open source hardware and software, that would monitor the whole city space. I’ve scattered these sensors around a city to generate visualisations and sonifications in various cities. For my first project [Sensity] they were output onto a visual globe.

So, now what I was interested in doing is looking at this real time data, that’s now everywhere, and seeing if I could do something else with it – if I could make art with it.

Equally, in Sonicity I deliberately put a whole load of speakers on the floor and connected them all up to make it look like a map, and somewhere else (in another part of the world) that data is being collected from my network and being spat out onto the internet via an XML stream. In arty terms, maybe I’m “painting with data” – the data has become the medium. With this data I’m painting a sonification of the real time landscape.

The second thing I was trying to think about, as part of this thinking process, was all the stuff that’s being collected about us – not just my data, but tax data and medical records – which could be used because of the way it changes and shifts from one thing to the next to power other events:

With CapacitiesI made…let’s call it a sculpture…a sculpture of computer parts that looks like a city, and would be powered by events changing somewhere else in real time. In this version of Capacities, all the lights and fans, and all the parts that change, do so because of other things happening in the world in real time.

The reason I’m trying to do that is that there seem to be other values that people are missing in terms of the things that are happening to us, and the world, in real time. We’ve become bodies residing in a ‘data space’. Everything around us is the data space and by default we interact with it – even small movements displace millions of atoms.

I conceive of this post-modern world in which movements are just moving a series of 0s and 1s. I can measure the 0s and 1s that I’m displacing by moving around. This interactive process is embedded in the work by default.

Visitors to a Gallery… is quite an important work, in that it opens up the gallery space as an artwork. For example, these two people that are pictured aren’t actually in this room – they’re in another room in another part of the gallery, so they’re embedded in the artwork that you’re viewing. Everybody in the architectural space becomes part of the artwork, and this happens in real time – it’s not recorded, and it’s not a film. So I utilize the technology in the space (the CCTV system).

Secondly, what’s happening here is that there are a series of proximity sensors that affect this as an algorithm – as you walk around this space all of these images oscillate/vibrate slightly.

So when you’re in the room, viewing this artwork, you’re at the same time generating an artwork for someone else in another room?

STANZA: And you’re in the work you’re viewing yourself, through your interaction with the sensors.

That’s also happening in Seeing Through Walls, where there are little cameras and monitors, so you become embedded in the same artwork as it’s being broadcast live, or in this piece where you can see through to people on the other side of the wall.

I was actually in a Greek club where they had something like that – the mirrors in the toilet let you see yourself, but also the women doing their makeup in the adjacent toilets…

STANZA: Ha! No wonder their ecomony’s gone down the pan…

Moving on from that, my work splits into this idea of using real time networks and investigating different ways of interacting with public space.

Here’s a strange project called The Binary Graffiti Club, where I got a load of people to dress up in hoodies with 0s and 1s on their backs, and they go round the city making binary graffiti – painting little coded messages onto the city.

Anything in particular?

STANZA: Well…no. I don’t want to be too specific about this, because… Well here’s a piece going back to the DNA project (the open source bit). If you sit in the gallery for…this has been online for seven years: If it was exhibited in a gallery you could get my open source DNA, and you could go off and replicate me, but it changes a letter once every second so you’d have to sit there for 104 years with a pen and paper. The same is true of the binary graffiti club – if you want to know what the message is, you have to sit there and transcribe it and translate it.

One letter from STANZA’s DNA code – the letters are shown in order, one per second for the 104 year project

This led from another piece of work – A City of Bits – as well as this performance that was laid down in the form of this sushi: I invited 12 people, after the disciples, and asked them to come and eat this coded sushi message. So, this is a coded message that they eat, and then they all put their own message back into a jar which I’ve now destroyed. I’ve transcribed those messages here…

You have a performance coming up in Texas soon – tell me a bit about what you’ll be doing.

STANZA: In Soundcities, using a recording device, I’ve been to all these different cities, recording sounds which are attached to Google Maps, and you can visit lots of cities in the world…

The key to this is the database; you can see the sounds, arranged in different categories, and you can create a performance by picking a selection of them and building up rhythms. This is what I do with my performances, except I have the same thing on a couple of machines, and I might mix it with sounds from churches, etc. It’s basically a live world tour of city sounds as music: the machines are connected to a mixing desk, images are coming from the website projects.

During the eight years I’ve been doing these performances, they’ve been heavily focused on the sounds of cities, the database live and soundmaps.

So this database can be used in performances, but the key here is that the database is open source, and other people can contribute to this community of sounds. There’s lots of other projects that have come from this, but the most important bit is this. This XML feed shows the sound, and its longitude/latitude, and although this is just a line of code it basically means that anyone else can use this to write their own apps.

What I’m doing that’s unique here is: it’s like an artist of the past allowing someone into their studio to work in parallel with them.

www.stanza.co.uk

The Internet of Things. PART II. A City of Data Sculptures.

June 11th, 2012

The Art of Environmental Data. The Internet of Things. Visualisations and sonifications of the real time city.

British artist Stanza In ItalyIn 2004 I layered the city with sensors for my Sensity projects. Dozens of them to access the “data” and make it public. I wanted to claim this space as a public domain, and to create a series of social sculptures affected in real time by the changes in the city. The aim is to make smart networks that have data open to all, and not closed off spy surveillance oriented systems. These networks could be thought of as open social sculptures that inform the world and create new meaningful experiences. Thousands of motes could be deployed across the city for gathering data in wireless sensor networks. Used in large numbers they communicate with one another via radio signals across the network. They can reconfigure themselves, so that the network stays stable. The data is funelled through a system to a point where it can then be interpreted. The motes monitor the the environment for changes in temperature, sounds, light, position, acceleration, vibration, stress, weight, pressure, humidity, and gps. Motes and sensor boards monitor the micro incidents of change in the city, the noise, traffic flows and people flows. The interactions of all this data, controlled via mixed up interfaces that can re-form and re-contextualise experiences in real time as social sculpture.

 

The Control Space.

Imagine walking out the door, and knowing every single action, movement, sound, micro movement, pulse, and thread of information is being tracked, monitored, stored, analysed, interpreted, and logged. The world we will live in seems to be a much bigger brother, than first realised. Its the mother of big brother. Its a world full of data that can help understand the fundamentals of our outside environment, and monitor the micro codes of our DNA, a world where we are liberated and empowered by data, where finally all of the technology becomes more than gimmick and starts to actually  work for us. This is where these projects and artworks start. In addition to this, the artwork allude to a more socially engaged practise, based on critical reflection of notions of privacy, surveillance space, and control space, speculating on the interactive city and meaning of real time space.

Towards The Emergent City

Stanza Art

The “Sensity” artworks were made from the data that is collected from urban environment locations. The networks of sensors collected data, which is then published online. The sensors interpret the micro-data of the interactive city. The output from the sensors displays the “emotional” state of the city online and the information is used to create installations and sculptural artifacts. I believe them to be in effect emergent social sculptures visualizing the emotional state of the city. The sensor network can be moved from urban to rural setting and different types of visualization can be made depending on the environment.
Sensity is also a highly technical project that can output vast amounts of information about the fabric of our cities. By embedding the sensors like this we can re-engage with the urban fabric and waeve new artistic metaphors within city space. Custom made software enables these sensors to communicate will one another in a network over a proxy server in real time.  The data is also available for others and can be used to create visualizations in the open source environment that is online. (see xml streams).

Representations of these datasets allows unique understanding of the urban environment from this real time perspective. The interactions of all this data, controlled via interfaces that can re-form and re-contextualize experiences in real time. Sensity becomes a holistic city system. The sense city is a city of, accumulated incidents of love, abuse and death. The micro incidents of change in the weather, the noise traffic flows and people flows. Sensity leverages the real time data city and represents it online showing the life of the system and the emerging changing bahaviours of the space.

The data is the Medium.

stanza

stanza

In artworks such as Sensity, Facade, House, Sonicity, Capacities  etc I  connect up networks of real time information flows. The shared data space can overlap and there is a new space the space in between that only two nodes share. I have merged collected data from various cities and created an aestheticization of the shared city space.

I now believe there is a new social space that exists in between these independent networks. Future cities will be merged into real time connected up data cities.  A connection of networks of real time information flows. The results created lead to mashed up cities and real time performative city experiences.

These systems re–employ our perception creating new understanding of how this mixed city behaviour unfolds. There is an opportunity to influence this process and the system and we can also create variables into the networks that will allow greater understanding of the data and the resulting information. Data has become the medium of the age.

A City of Sculptures

In one of my experiments “Capacities” I have made a new city of ‘sculptures’ re-presenting real time spaces and data environments. I investigated the loop from the real to the virtual and back to the real space. This notion of playing or manipulating with a malleable form (data) is made possible as each stream, each node, each sensor, or even the entire network can be communicated with using XML online gateways. The project was instigated by setting up my own wireless sensors networks across London to collect environmental data which was then published online in real time for an extended period of time. The output from the sensors display an interpretation of the real time city online, while that same information was evaluated and then re-visualized in the creation of numerous artworks, back in the public domain.  The resulting artworks represent the real time conditions of the city.

The artistic aim is create new meaningful experiences allowing critical reflection on the real time city and the social political undercurrent embedded in the search for the real time city. This allows for a greater community of interpreters and beneficiaries to see, and to come to their own understandings arising from this data about our socially-networked environment. ..stanza 2010

The Emergent City. The City Of Data. 2004 – 2012.

June 11th, 2012

The Emergent City. 2004 – 2012. From Fixed Assets to open Systems and Media visualisations.

The Centrtal City for Madrid Vida

This artwork has moved from fixed assets to interactive systems to open generative systems.  In 2002 Stanza started to develop less fixed systems that culled data and media from other sources. These mash-ups or interactive collage systems include “Subfusion”, “CITYV” etc. In these systems there is no fixed tangible lists of assets (ie they are not databases) they are drawn or harvested via software from spaces. Stanza also moved away from real world studio practise to a online studio space for experimentation and output of ideas, and finished artworks. From artist as author to system as author….whose does the output being to?

The City Of Data.

The Emergent city has become a body of all connected by a central theme. As you know a city is a web of  connected networks.  In essence, the city fabric is a giant multi-user, multi-data sphere. The city is made up of traffic patterns,  pedestrian patterns,  bird flocking patterns. Patterns can be seen in the architecture, patterns in the buildings, patterns in the architectural fabric of the urban design network.  All of  these spheres can be represented by media and therefore by data within the digital realm. And all of this data can be interpreted and mediated. It becomes a matter of choice. Collections of data can be stored to be retrived later. The mobile data infrastructure becomes a data source so powerful so interwoven that its  scale can only be imagined as metaphor. The size and scope of such an archive, of such rich mediated data experience can support  many projects.  As such it can be interpreted via a variety of interfaces.

Cities offer the opportunity for unique types of data gathering experiences via a  variety  of sources.  My objective has been  to ‘mediate’ data into conceptual and cultural artifacts. With this perspsective there are many unimagined threads of data and connections that describe our world that can be explored through wireless mobile networks within which we can create artistic interpretations.

There are various types of data can be re-imagined. This includes pollution data recorded via sensors in the street, to create audio files. Weather and forecast data, acquired via weather station equipment, this can be used and can create ambient soundscapes and morphing visualisations as the wind shifts direction or the rain increases. Noise monitor levels, and noise maps, create a symphony of true urban sounds that can be used to make sound reactive sculptures.

Under this umberella title of ‘The Emergent City’ project I have made a number of artworks, installations, sonifications and visualisations between 2004 and 2012  that have move beyond the process of research, beyond what I  term as asset gathering, into softwares, installations and prototypes.

Parrallel Realities

An example is the artwork ” Urban Generation; trying to imagine the world from everyone else’s perspective, all at once”. 2002- 5.

Multiple CCTV cameras are accessed randomly in real time to make this urban tapestry. What you see is an evolving, generative artwork. These images are from taken London, and they happen as you see them, in real time. The installation versions of this work can be presented in art galleries using projectors or plasma displays.

This online artwork represents many realities that exist in city space. The observed real time surveillance society is re worked into a series of grids. This presents London to a global online audience. The data that you see is protected by the data protection act. Here it is re mixed into what you see, which is this online artwork that look like a filmic experience, but sits not a film. Its a real time experience of the city from multiple perspectives I cal it a parrellel reality.

The online version now runs as a series of twelve real time perspectives of the emergent city experience . This ‘film’ is constantly evolving and will never be the same again, the images are not recorded. Each screen is a live real time image from a camera in the city of London. The artwork seeks to explores the rhizomatic multi nodal networked experience. Urban Generation draws on images across the networked city, the artwork creates a unique interpretation of a multi point perspective that exists in time always in the present.

Stanza: CCTV Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Data cities and control spaces

The city also has millions of CCTV. In essence the city is the biggest TV station in existence. Millions of hours worth of data are recorded every day by these cameras on city TV. One can take the sounds and images off live web streams and  re-represent them thus creating new interpretations of the city in the process.

The city already has a recorded source of data, cctv is everywhere. Using data from CCTV, you can bring the outside inside. Selected feeds are collected from around the world in real time. These real time images are fed into a software system  where a  series of specialised channels rework these images. The channels are always on, and  always changing, a constant  view  of  the world changing  and evolving around  the  clock. This artwork uses  specially created software and technology  to  randomly find images in real time from anywhere in the network, in this case anywhere in the world.

The increase of technology infrastructure in the daily existence of a city means that technology will, more than ever be everywhere in our environment. Mobile data mining will be part of the fabric of the landscape.  We will be carrying this data in pods, phones and ID cards. Everything is or will be tracked. CCTV, car sensors, tracking inside our phones, ID card movement, and tracking in the guise of anti- terror activity.

The patterns we make, the forces we weave, are all being networked into retrievable data structures that can be re-imagined and sourced for information. These patterns all disclose new ways of seeing the world. The value of information will be a new currency as power change. The central issue that will develop will be the privilege and access to these data sources. Uses of this information and data should allow rich new interpretations on the way our world is built, used, and designed.

So we need to imagine the city at a different scale. The possibility is to extend our imagination and enable that perception of the city as a dynamic network. We can now put systems in place that can re–employ our perception and thus create new understanding of how this behaviour unfolds. There are patterns, they are connected and the systems that evolve, can be simulated and acted upon.

We can influence the process and the system and we can also create variables into this system that allows understanding of the bi-products of the system, the data and the resulting information..stanza 2009

 

The Internet Of Things. Part 1(the art of gathering environmental data.)

June 11th, 2012

stanza-049Selected projects I have made since 2004 that demonstrate the art of gathering environmental data. The Internet Of Things. These work came into being because of a Nesta Dreamtime award and AHRC creative fellowship grant. Most of these artworks where made 2004 – 2012.

 

Sensity

http://www.stanza.co.uk/sensity/index.html

Sensity artworks are made from the data that is collected across the urban and environment infrastructure. The sensors interpret the micro-data of the interactive city. The output from the sensors display the “emotional” state of the city online in real time and the information is also used to create offline installations and sculptural artworks.

Datacities

http://www.soundcities.com/data.php

These datamaps show live environmental data from a 40 motes wireless sensor network that can be deployed anywhere. They monitor light, temperature, humidity, noise.

 

Intelligent Sheep: Baa Ram Ewe…to your clan be true.

http://www.stanza.co.uk/sheep/index.html

This is an interactive sound performance and concert. This artwork uses local environmental data collected using ad hoc wireless networked devices for environmental monitoring, which are attached to the sheep. In this case the dozen sheep collect and send data about the environment, and respond to the space as a collective as they move about.

Faith

http://www.stanza.co.uk/ingodwetrust/index.html

Faith is an artwork made using data harvested from sensors scattered over the cathedral. The sensors respond to changes in the environment they are located in this case Liverpool Catherdral. The data is turned into a sound stream, this sound stream represents Gods presence and you can listen to this sounds, the sound of God.

 

House

http://www.stanza.co.uk/house/index.html

House is a dynamic public sculpture viewable over the internet. House describes the space, a real Victorian terraced house, in this case, that the artist lives in. House is a live embodiment of change and renewal. In “House”, the private interior has been made public. Sensor data unfolds and discloses the inherent properties of the space, creating an online artwork.

Tree

http://www.stanza.co.uk/tree/index.html

A tree that makes music and sings a song about the environment. The first version of Tree used 40 networked multi sensors. The sensors are hidden all over a tree, broadcasting sensor data ( light, temperature, humidity, noise, and GPS location). The data is translated to music. The results produce a singing networked tree which can be heard in the park.

 

A world of new possibilities.

http://www.stanza.co.uk/possibilities/index.html

The landscape becomes virtual, dynamic, and encoded. The artwork discloses the underlying data that we see that is changing all the time in front of us.

 

Gallery

http://www.stanza.co.uk/gallery/index.html

The gallery becomes the artwork formed by the emergent real time data in the space. The gallery laid bare as a work of art. Gallery proposes that the data is art. The art is a real time flow of the things around us that allow our senses to invoke understanding. The gallery space becomes the art described by the shifts in light, temperature and noises in the space over time.

data data data

http://www.stanza.co.uk/data/index.html

“data data data”, is a live real time data visualisation made using sensors which are scattered over the building. The sensors respond to changes in gallery space ie the environment of the building. The changing data is turned into this visual event and projected outside across the city, in this case Liverpool. This artwork is networked, its real time, and its takes data from a wireless sensor network that is placed in the real space.
Façade

http://www.stanza.co.uk/facade/index.html

The facade is a live dynamic interface, an artwork that changes its behaviour as a result of the changing condition in the environment. This works by sensing the city and the environment to make art. The results become representations of the real time spaces and environment of Trondheim in Norway. The output from the sensors display the real time environmental and emotional state of the city online in real time and the information will be used on the façade and online interface to control it.
Capacities

http://www.stanza.co.uk/capacities/index.html

In Capacities the whole gallery space becomes one large artwork made from real time city information and data. The aesthetic and feel of the space looks like an electronic city.  The city is made of units, grids, repetition, building blocks. In the gallery city called ‘Capacities’ the leads, the wires, and cables are incorporated into the artwork to look like a city map.  Capacities looks “designed” like a piece of urban design, a city surveyed and controlled.  The whole space becomes a map to wander through.

 

Sonicity

http://www.stanza.co.uk/sonicity/index.html

This artwork is a responsive installation, a sonification of the real space and environment. The sounds you hear are the sounds of the changing environment, ie the changes of noise, light, temperature of the space is turned into a real time sound stream using dozens of wireless sensors presented as an installation on 170 speakers. My system monitors the space (the building) and the environment (the city) and captures live real time data (light , temperature, noise, humidity, position) to create an ambient sonification, an acoustic responsive environment, literally the sound of the micro incidents of change that occur over time.

www.stanza.co.uk

stanza@sublime.net

 

The Art of Environmental Data By Stanza

June 11th, 2012

The Art of Environmental Data.

An interview with Stanza via email for Jack Stewart studying at the Manchester School of Architecture operating under the umbrella of the Remap Unit, which focus upon mapping and data collection to expose the latent and invisible qualities of the city.

Stanza Sensors On Google Maps

Stanza places sensors On Google maps 2006.

The Art of Environmental Data.

1. The Sensity Projects aim to record data in the emerging city environment; how do you feel the use of such data could be useful for architects and designers in informing their designs?

This is an area seems to be springing into the mainstream, led I believe by the notion of “the internet of things” and the business spin off potential. It is surprising that urban designers and architects haven’t embraced this work more quickly or recognised that at the very least there is opportunity here to integrate the space around us using these novel ad hoc sensor technologies. Some engineering firms have and are looking into this like ARUP and obviously wireless sensing tech is now big business.  I have been trying for some time to get on board with an architect with the idea of doing something like Façade (see below)

Sensity and its sister projects have gone along way to not only illuminating possible uses but and to demonstrate multiple scenarios.

Anyway to be specific, other scenarios that could be questioned from the data sets include, noise monitoring across spatial environments and how this is affected by a real time input. More specifically focused sensors could give data that can lead to conclusions about what types of material are best suited for a site, or even a “consciousness” of the space, as well as all the bio chemical possibilities.

Most of these types of systems themselves can also be “building management systems”. The data can not only be adapted for security and monitoring the social welfare of the space can be nurtured; it could feed back into a system designed to self regulate depending on the variables and properties imposed.

Stanza House Data Visualisation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. How do you feel that Sensity and Soundcities re-innovate and enrich the urban systems we currently operate in?

This has to be taken as two questions because of the underlying structure and objectives of these two separate projects.

Sensity for sure allows us to see or at least make more tangible the invisible in the world around us. Sensity supports this premise by producing new information that is changing real time. This information is being also affected by out default interactions with the space and the environment. The Sensity project allows us to speculate on the city itself as a living breathing space with its own DNA that evolves and mutates. This metaphorical approach allows a freedom to speculate that the spaces we design are in fact emergent entities and that various properties and variables can be monitored; ie the stresses of the space and “emotional” conditions are what make a space enjoyable habitable or even dangerous. Sensity can up pick on this.

Soundcities, because it works in a different way addresses issues that I describe as being more of the modernist age. However as noise and sound involve field recording (we are also presenting the art of environmental monitoring). However now we are taking about the sound we literally hear as we walk out of the door. Not just as noise (data) or as noise pollution but also as an appreciation of sound and how this not only affects the space but is the space.

The noise is the city, the noise is the music, the city is the orchestra and we are just conductors whose interactive actions compose this music as we walk around. What Soundcities does is create an open source archive, a resource where better speculative questions could be addressed. The unique XML feed system also allows other to make user interactions both software and hardware that can control the sounds or to make spatialisation and sonfications of the environment based on the analogue recorded sounds.

Image (c) Stanza Datacity art. Data from across the city.

3. Why do you feel the recording of emergent or changing data of the city is important?

It was my research as an artist that has led me here from fixed object and linear works about the city and urban design (i.e. paintings drawing) I then made interactive systems and closed generative systems.

I concluded that the next model was to adopt and create a real time system. My feeling for this is primarily based on my inquiry into how to work with “time” itself. These works are not archived. In Sensity the data is not recording; the works, the experience, ever exists in the present. It’s that moment that I am interested in making more of. I want to somehow get inside the idea of present time.

This present tense we all share with one another in a very equal way does not discriminate. The present second as it shifts to the next is the moment that I want to understand. So the question is slightly skewed as there is no “recording” in the Sensity process (I have yet to build in an archival set of data results as I haven’t been funded to take this further and this would be most useful i.e. to study a space over a longer time.

This is why the research is needed. To answer the why question?

4. Soundcities takes similar concepts from your previous work, but provides a platform for anybody with access to the net to add to. Do you feel this has richer content and why?

The soundcities content is different. Instead of being data sets and numbers that relate to the environment in real time the soundcities takes snapshots of the environment as sound that is recorded then placed online. The interesting thing now is the project is opened up for others allowing a re mixing or mash up. It allows these “others” to do with the “material” other things for example concerts and art installations. Using the XML feed other applications are created ie phone apps merged with you PS position or visualisation of noise across a space…all sorts of things are possible.

5. If architects were to inform their designs through data from Soundcities do you think there would be a social exclusion issue for those without access to the internet and why?

I think the sensors in Sensity project would be better for this sort of thing. However the issue becomes about the network, borders of control, and issues to do with sharing and protection. In my view it will get really interesting when dozens of spaces and buildings all link up in virtual space.  To create what I term ”The Third Space”. (This was a funding proposal rejected by the AHRC and The tech Strategy Board.

I suggest there are over lapping areas of the city which can only be found online ie merged cities online Madrid, London Paris can overlap. I will go intio  more details.  below.

6.  How would you consider to further develop your projects

I have many ideas for this but no money as I am not funded.

However is a summary  of The Third Space. The project seeks via practise based research to create novel artistic interfaces using environmental data.  Outputs from the research include sonifications, visualizations, and sculptural objects.

This work focused on data as a medium for artistic creativity and how meaningful and well as poetic experiences of space / environments may result from quantitative analysis of the results. The aim is to speculate on new ways of comparing, conceptualizing and then visualizing environmental data and real space.

I  proposed in a recent interview for The Internet of Things Council  (http://tinyurl.com/3trotzq) that future cities will be merged into real time connected up data cities. Not just one space, but a connection of networks and of real time information flows. I am now interested in developing deeper research over three years to question how this shared dataspace can overlap,  creating a new space in between, which multiple nodes can share.

The methodology involves collecting data from sensor networks, disseminating the computer techniques developed, and making artistic prototypes. The aim here is to give tangible form to this new space, the space where the cities overlap, presenting an alternative urban virtual environment and creating new artworks and installations.

Within “The Third Space”, the initial focus is on the data sets of noise, pollution, light, and temperature. In other words the sensors will initially monitor urban environments.

To achieve this I will connect up multiple spaces (cities / environments) using motes sensors and this will be published online via XML feeds. These new online spaces will in turn lead to newly created online bespoke interfaces. I then aim to demonstrate that there is a new and unique online avatar where the data overlaps creating the Third Space. I will speculate how the flow of the data can be set to affect the behaviour of the output environment.

I would network at least three cities spaces in real time for this project using custom sensing technology. Initial outputs will include a musical system / interface powered by the merged data to create a real time sonification of the Third Space

 

7. What would you say are the challenges we face in further developing and integrating data collection like Sensity into the urban realm?

The questions I  pursue to answer this include:-

– How can this information be meaningfully represented to new audiences?

– How can this data be displayed (visualisation and sonifications) in new and original ways and do the results create new ways of understanding the environment?

– What are wider social implications of opening up real time networks; who owns this space and what are the ethical implications of real time information systems for artworks?

Underpinning this work, are a whole series of potential problems about observation, surveillance, and the ethics of the control space. I research current surveillance systems and wireless sensor networks to  come to an understanding about the social and ethical implications of such technologies both in artworks as well as public domain space.

By building my own art systems and tools, (which support my research questions); I also aim to raise further questions about the ethics of the control space and surveillance culture.

 

Syncronicity By Stanza

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8. How do you feel that artworks such as your own could shape a ‘future city’?

Future cities will be merged into real time connected up data cities. I believe there is a new social space that exists in between independent virtual data networks, a new avatar space. The Third Space and the work I have done before have becomes  a series of  artistic prototypes that offer new insights into networked spaces.

9. All of your projects are open source; what is your reasoning for this decision?

I don’t like the term open source or but my work endeavours to collapse the borders created by networks so there is a free flow and exchange through the system both for input and outputs of ideas and latterly resources which I call assets (the data and the information.

10. How do you feel projects such as your own pave the way for empowering and liberating the city dweller?

The aim in my work is to develop a more socially engaged practise, to embed a deeper context based on critical reflection regarding notions of privacy, surveillance space, control space and meaning of newly created  real time spaces.

11. Your data visualizations are stunning; what do you feel the importance is for translating the data your gather into something people can visualize and understand?

The objectives is both to create new artistic experiences questioning the notion of realtime environments while using of data as a medium and delivering creative outputs.

And also create work that reflects upon issues of privacy, and surveillance space.

I think I would get sidetracked here but maybe I could just say the objective is to create a new way of seeing and the experiencing the space/ environment. work ls around us.

By doing it this was not only do we see how we affect the systems but and most important the use ie users (us the people) are by default embedded in the interactive and responsive process. In other words we become part of the work.

I am interested in making systems where by default the users are the work, the artwork. Its a feedback  loop, every actions we have has a reaction, every reaction causes change, this change happens over time and its reflected back in front of us either as the changing world we experience and now as art.

12.  How do you feel your projects impact the ownership of the spaces they are deployed in?

This question needs an essay in its own right and goes off in another direction that’s interested me for some time. I made called Public Domain where I tackled this question head on. Public Domain uses live CCTV across the city to extend space and invoke impressions of transparency with architectural space. . Public Domain is an experimental approach to ownership in information in networks. Instead of the linear tree like system with the one central viewer, all the cameras and views (resulting data) are given away and all the views can be seen online by all. The data is mixed into an online collage, using specially created software viewable by all.

http://www.stanza.co.uk/public_domain_outside/index.html

 

http://www.stanza.co.uk/publicdomain/index.html

Another work “Visitors to a Gallery- referential self, embedded” uses the live CCTV system inside an art gallery to create a responsive mediated architecture. This artwork is responsive to the body in the data space. The visitors act as an intervention in the gallery space and become embedded in the artwork.  The idea of using the information inside the space is also to make the space transparent and extend the gallery space outwards. The gallery space is also extended virtually onto the internet as the feeds from the installations images are broadcast live. The visitors to the gallery thus become embedded in the artwork and this permeates the larger system of data and information over the internet.

Stanza 2012

 

 

 

 

 


 

Stanza: Can we use new technologies to imagine a world where we are liberated and empowered. An interview between Stanza and Rob van Kranenburg of the Internet Of Things

May 3rd, 2012

An interview between Stanza and Rob van Kranenburg of the Internet Of Things

RvK: Stanza, you were among the first internet artists. What would you say is the most important philosophical step (if we can think in terms of ‘progress’, or ‘going somewhere’) that you have taken in this period? “In the last twenty years there has been a significant shift in audio visual artists’ practise from linear expressions, to interactive (user controlled) mediations, to generative (evolving) and then network-based (real time) systems. Online, this space  also expands the whole notion of the artist’s studio.  My focus is on the things that change, the flow, the data that describes our experience of the city as space. Data from all sides in systems that can be mediated by all, with varying visualizations communicated over the internet and represented onto different display systems.

There are many theoretical aspects to my work, but primarily I am a practice-based artist……in other words I make stuff.

My work has covered experiments in these areas and traced a shift in practise from modernist approaches of asset gathering (linear construction) to arrangements of datasets in fixed lists or databases (interactivity) to new approaches of mining information across networks in real time.( generative and real time systems)……culling data off CCTV networks, making visualizations of cities from my wireless sensor networks.”

RvK: How do feel about the current actualizations of the ‘in between’ space that you felt, saw or heard coming some time ago?

“I believe there is a new social space that exists in between these independent networks. Future cities will be merged into real time connected up data cities.  A connection of networks of real time information flows. The results created will lead mashed up cities and real time performative city experiences.  This conclusion although led from my earlier trails using wireless sensors in a project called Sensity.

I am interested in how this shared data space can overlap creating a new space in between which only two nodes or spaces share. For example in one of my artistic experiments I have  merged collected data from various real time cities to visualise this new space, the space where the cities overlap and which allude to a new architectural and urban virtual space. Uses of such information might allow rich new interpretative visualisations about the way our world is built, used, and designed.

The resulting artworks represent the real time conditions of the city.  Works like “Sensity”, create real time interpretations of social spaces that inform the world (online), and hopefully create new meaningful experiences allowing critical reflection on the real time city and the social political undercurrent embedded in the search for the real time city.

This might also allow for a greater community of interpreters and beneficiaries to see, and to come to their own understandings arising from this data about our socially-networked environment.  (as the data in these projects is open via XML)

Underpinning these artworks and research, are a whole series of potential problems about observation, surveillance, and the ethics of the control space.  Imagine walking out the door, and knowing every single action, movement, sound, micro movement, pulse, and thread of information is being tracked, monitored, stored, analyzed, interpreted and logged.

The world we will live in seems to be a much bigger brother than the Orwellian vision, it’s the mother of big brother.

Can we use new technologies to imagine a world where we are liberated and empowered, where finally all of the technology becomes more than gimmick and starts to actually work for us or are these technologies going to control up, separate us, divide us, create more borders. Will the securitization of city space create digital borders that monitor our movement and charge us for our own micro movements inside the system?”

RvK: The data is the medium, you state. Can you explain this a little bit?

“Just  that… the data is the medium of the age….”

RVK: Can you find connections to the FB generation? Do you want to?

“It has a useful API as do all these new big sites; however there are restrictions entering the domains and boundaries of others especially when they  try to cross over and get monitised.”

RvK: The key  (or one of the keys) is  the granularity of input for these ‘smart’ systems. How do you see this?

“Yes, small unit blocks, simplified then re built , re-cored re-formed into an understanding that can re-communicate the complexity of the larger system. Strip the city down and re- configure it as a real-time visualization and plug it into other cities.”

The art of gathering data Sesnors in the city

The art of gathering data. Sensors  in the city

RvK: Your work is filled with wonder? Do you feel that this wonder is facilitated somehow in what is now termed Internet of Things?

“I have tried to encompass this “wonder” about real time connectivity and networked space  in my  latest three works, they are about the “internet of things”, but equally  they  are about real  time experiences of the environment and the spaces that change around us.”

Issues In Science And Technology, Spring 2012. Dear Hillary Rodman Clinton

April 13th, 2012

For those of you who know me well, you might find this quite funny. I was recently asked to for twelve images for a US based magazine who said they wanted to do a feature on Stanza. I thought why not, so I prepared the images 300 dpi for the editor as requested and sent them off. A couple of weeks later with a 44 dollar stamp they sent me four copies, very kind. (Most journalists don’t event bother)

Stanza Sensity

Stanza Sensity

Anyway its always nice to see your artworks in print over breakfast and they did look nice. Twelve images of “Sensity”, the live city data art project in the magazine Issues In Science And Technology, Spring 2012. However on first glance I couldn’t believe it they had used my images it seemingly to illustrate a text that wasn’t about me or by me. Off I steamed…. this editor needs an email.

Anyway before I  shot myself in the foot, I thought I better give it a read. The article is  on “Internet Freedom and Human Rights”,  just my thing, I wonder who wrote it……err

Dear Hillary Rodman Clinton thanks for using my artworks in your essay…. …

I got another coffee together and gave it a proper read, it’s not bad actually.  “the more people online contributing ideas,  the more valuable the network becomes to all the other users”………

“If we are not careful, governments could upend the current Interent governance in a quest to increase their own control….”…The last point rather timely since the UK are about do just that.

Stanza Sensors On Google Maps

Stanza Sensors On Google Maps

(http://www.stanza.co.uk/sensity/index.html)

The city and the Internet becomes public domain space. By Stanza.

December 8th, 2010

stanza artwork

 

Can we use new technologies to imagine a world where we are liberated and empowered, where finally all of the technology becomes more than gimmick and starts to actually work for us or are these technologies going to control up, separate us, divide us, create more borders. The securization of city space create digital borders that monitor our movement and charge us for our own micro movements inside the system.

My wireless sensor network is set up to visualize cities as ‘worlds’ full of data, a city of bits. These new data-spaces can help us understand the fundamentals of our outside environment. There is an argument to opening up the level of control and responsibility given allows freedom within the system. It’s a good argument until something changes, the passwords change, the building goes private, and every single piece of data is used for something that it wasn’t intended for. Some things change for the better but sometimes they don’t; one thing is for sure; things change.

Therefore my focus is on the things that change, the flow, the data that describes our experience of the city as space.

Future cities will be merged real time connected up data cities.

I envisage the city of the future will start to build a system that will integrate this data into a sort of semantic city. A visualized flow city data experience will allow us to see ‘the soul of the city’. By mixing the XML outputs of the various cities I have created interfaces to mash up the city experience into common themes and poetic threads.

The city and the Internet becomes public domain space. A brand new era. The Magic is Complete.

We just moved from fixed assets and linear systems, to interactive and generative works and finished in a real time emergent space across networked cities.

This space is very much up for grabs commercially, like the coded DNA inside our bodies, the shared city information spaces represent a mine of resources to be exploited…..where the boundaries and locked fences exist in the real world are generally controlled by the state in the virtual world, it seems commerce is having the upper hand.

Stanza 2007

Sonicity: Networked Soundscape at Lanternhouse

December 7th, 2010
stanza artwork sonicty

Stanza Installation. 2010. Sonification Of Space

Sonicity Installation is now available for touring.

This installation artwork focuses on the real time space and the experience of the gallery visitor as they interact with the space, using data gathered from  new technologies.

Sonicity is a responsive installation, a sonification of the real space and environment. The sounds you hear are the sounds of the changing environment, ie the changes of noise, light, temperature of the space is turned into a real time sound stream using dozens of wireless sensors presented as an installation on 170 speakers.

The funding for all the speakers and installation version was made possible by financial support of Lanternhouse International.

Sonicity is a responsive installation, a sonification of the data space.The sounds you hear are the sound of the changing environment, ie : the changes of noise, light, temperature of the space is turned into a real time sound stream using dozens of wireless sensors.


The system monitors the space (the building) and the environment (the city) and captures live real time data (light , temperature, noise, humidity, position) to create an ambient sonification, an acoustic responsive environment, literally the sound of the micro incidents of change that occur over time.

The objective is to explore new ways of thinking about interaction within public space and how this affects the socialization of space. The project uses environmental monitoring technologies and security based technologies, to question audiences experiences of the event and space and gather data inside the space.

The project also focuses on the micro-incidents of change, the vibrations and sounds of the gallery using wireless sensor based technologies. Motes are used to collect the data. The ‘motes’ are tiny wireless sensor boards that gather data and communicate to the central server. The real world is monitored and the data stored in my archive retrieval system. Motes and sensor boards sense the micro incidents of change in the light, the noise, temperature, sounds of the flows inside the space.

Using the XML live feeds the data can be turned in music. A custom made MAX/MSP motereader and sound synthesis engine has now been written. This allows one to hear the sounds of space, ie : an aural experience of the surrounding space. Additional mixers in the software allow all the sensors to be mixed and cross mashed. Basically this allows you to perform with space.

Capacities gets award in Digital Turku.

December 7th, 2010

Capacities was given an award in Digital Turku in Finland for 2011. This is more great news the whole installation will be on show for two  months some time next year.

stanza artist capacities

Image: Stanza Capacities.2010. Responsive data artwork.

About Capacities:  The real world is made virtual and the virtual is made real again and exposed in the process.

The whole gallery space becomes one large artwork made from real time city information and data. The aesthetic and feel of the space looks like an electronic city.  The city is made of units, grids, repetition , building blocks. In the gallery city called ‘Capacities’ the leads, the wires,and cables are incorporated into the artwork to look like a city map.’ Capacities’ looks “designed” like a piece of urban design, a city surveyed and controlled.

The whole space becomes a map to wander through.

http://www.stanza.co.uk/capacities/index.html

Another view:

stanza artist capacities

Image: Stanza 2010. Artwork Capacities.

The City Experience.

November 30th, 2010

The City Experience.

stanza_st2

The city experience is a web of connected networks and multi layered threaded paths that condition us to the emotional state of the city space. In essence, the city fabric is a giant multi user multi data sphere. To take part you really have to put something back in, that’s like life. In this case, to take part you have to input data so others ‘may’ see the output of the data response.

The city has a history of stories relative to time and place, stories from the street. Love stories personal and extreme, crime stories, stories that are small or that can affect global parameters. All of these spheres can be represented by media and therefore by data within the digital realm and becomes a data source so powerful so interwoven that its scale can only be imagined as metaphor. The size and scope of such an archive, of such rich mediated data experience would support many projects. As such it can be interpreted as history via one sort of interface or as a game via another sort of interface. A possible objective is to ‘mediate’ data into an artwork. With this perspective there are many unimagined threads of data and connections that describe our world that can be explored within which we can create artistic interpretations.

CCTV systems are everywhere in the public domain. We are all actors, bit part actors, in a giant movie called life. Except we cannot watch, it is not on public display and the results are monitored, filtered and distributed without our permission. The city also has millions of CCTV. In essence the city is the biggest TV station in existence. Millions of hours worth of data are recorded every day by these cameras on city TV. One can take the sounds and images off live web streams and re-represent them thus creating new interpretations of the city in the process. Using data from CCTV, you can bring the outside inside. Selected feeds are collected from around the world in real time. These real time images are fed into my software systems where a series of specialized channels rework these images. The channels are always on, and always changing, a constant view of the world changing and evolving around the clock. This uses specially created software and technology to randomly engage the cameras.

The increase of technology infrastructure in the daily existence of a city means that technology will, more than ever be everywhere in our environment. Everything is or will be tracked.