Posts Tagged ‘visualisation’

The Internet of Things World Forum (IoTWF)

May 25th, 2017

Stanza at The Internet of Things World Forum (IoTWF.  Stanza big data, Smart cities, IOT , internet of things , art, software Stanza at The Internet of Things World Forum (IoTWFStanza artwork on show at the The Internet of Things World Forum (IoTWF) is an exclusive industry event, hosted by Cisco. The IoTWF is widely recognized as the premier thought leadership forum designed to Evangelize and Energize IoT. Known as a must-attend event for key stakeholders and innovators in business, government, and academia, IoTWF brings industry leaders together to collaborate, network, partner, and solve the challenges facing IoT.

Previously held in Barcelona, Chicago, and Dubai, in 2017, IoTWF moves to London, Europe’s fastest growing technology capital. The 2017 IoTWF will explore the impact of IoT on business, technology and society and define a clear sense of the major priorities and challenges facing business as the world migrates towards IoT.

 Stanza big data, Smart cities, IOT , internet of things , art, software

Stanza big data, Smart cities, IOT , internet of things , art, software at the internet of Things World Forum thanks to Cisco Systems.

The Emergent City. Data from the city as hybrid artwork. Centre des Arts d’Enghien-les-Bains. Paris. France. 2014

July 22nd, 2014
The Emergent City. By Stanza

The Emergent City. A Life From Complexity to The City of Bits. By Stanza

The Emergent City. A Life From Complexity to The City of Bits. By Stanza

The Emergent City. A Life From Complexity to The City of Bits. By Stanza

The Emergent City. A Life From Complexity to The City of Bits. By Stanza

The Emergent City. A Life From Complexity to The City of Bits. By Stanza

The Emergent City. A Life From Complexity to The City of Bits.

The Emergent City. A Life From Complexity to The City of Bits.

New Commission – Software system manipulates the real time transport data in London

May 6th, 2014
Syncronicity: Layers of Infinite Possibilities In A World Of Closing Borders

Syncronicity: Layers of Infinite Possibilities In A World Of Closing Borders

Syncronicity: Layers of Infinite Possibilities In A World Of Closing Borders.” manipulates the real time transport data to re-interpret the city fabric as an organic pattern based system. Synchronicity becomes a hybridized maze, a cellular and organic system which is presented to the screen. The artwork uses real time bus and tube data from real time transport data London. 3d portrait of Stanza  inside live London data.How will big data empower the system and does this added value allow more freedom or does it seek a more subversive form of control?

http://stanza.co.uk/sycronicity1/index.htm

stanza_body2stanza_data1

Syncronicity: Layers of Infinite Possibilities In A World Of Closing Borders

Syncronicity: Layers of Infinite Possibilities In A World Of Closing Borders

Three Upcoming Exhibitions By British artist Stanza

March 14th, 2013

Three Upcoming Exhibitions By British artist Stanza

FALMOUTH Tremough Campus, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9EZ

Exhibition dates: 13th – 24th May 2013

Presenting Two Works:

A World of New Possibilities

The Singing Trees of Tremough

Stanza

This is a real time singing tree made from data in the and around the tree in situ in real time.

The signing Tree is made using data collected from the environment  using loads of motes sensors I have customised. And a new suite of software V2 has been made that helps the tree sing. The tree becomes virtual, dynamic, and encoded. The artwork disloses the underlying data that we see thats is changing all the time in front of us.

I am making a custom made speakers system all wireless to run off solar power with back – up batteries for the new version of the Tree sonification which uses real time environmental data.

 

Wyspa Institute of Art and Alternativa International Visual Arts Festival. Gdansk, Poland
May 24 until October 16th.

Presenting:-
Urban Generation; trying to imagine the world from everyone else’s perspective, all at once.  Urban Generation explores the emotional state of the metropolis and considers a world of universal surveillance. The artwork collects live CCTV feeds from 300 cameras in London in real time and reworks these video streams into multi-layered visual structures. The channels are always on, and therefore, the work is always changing – it depicts a constant and evolving view of the urban landscape and its inhabitants. This hasnt been shown for a while and the software has been checked and now uses more than 300 cameras around the city in real time. Awesome. Realy looking forward to  my first exhbition in Poland.
http://www.stanza.co.uk/urban_tapestry/index.html

 

stanza_art_installation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WATERMANS. 40 High Street, Brentford, West London, TW8 0DS

Opens 31 st May Close show 26 th July

Presenting:- I am excited about showing this in London for the first time. A new version of. “A Life In The Emergent City” which captures the changes over time in the environment (city) and represents the changing life and complexity of space as an emergent artwork. Capacities goes beyond simple single user interaction to monitor and survey in real time the whole city and entirely represent the complexities of the real time city as a shifting morphing and complex system. This version is bigger better and promises to be a little bit different.

stanza_artist-007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What you see is a sculpture which represents the emergent properties of the environment where the sensor network is situated.

Also on show will be several other new hyrid “involvement”s which will be presented during the exhbition.

stanza artist capacities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.stanza.co.uk/capacities/index.html

 

 

 

 

British artist Stanza wins SHARE PRIZE 2012 in Torino for Capacities. A piece of work using real time data of the city.

November 1st, 2012
The British artist Stanza  wins SHARE PRIZE 2012 in Torino for Capacities. A piece of work using real time data of the city. This artwork captures the changes over time in the environment (city) and represents the changing life and complexity of space as an emergent artwork. Its an artwork about the internet of things, smart cities and connecting spaces.
British artist Stanza In Italy

Jury Statement

What is the role of art today, in this moment of social transition towards the city of the future? It was from this perspective that the artists interpreted the theme Open Your City, exploring the key concepts word by word. The short-list of the Jury reflects the reappearing artistic interpretation of the modern urban landscape as system, where the solid element is replaced by the message, the information and the database, a real, but dematerialized city. Artists have been short-listed by an international jury, consisting of Simona Lodi, Carlo Ratti, Bruce Sterling and Mirjam Struppek, on the basis of the artistic value of their work and its relevance to the Share Prize theme.

Capacities: Real Time Complex – Connected Cities by British artist Stanza is an installation dedicated to the complexity of life in an environment. Changes in each of the spaces are monitored in real time, as they give rise to constant tensions, highlighting the behaviour of complex systems and the emergent properties that appear. In this case the organism is the city and not the single individual; it is the entire urban habitat as a whole, revealing its nature as a multifaceted system. The installation is the real-time mirror image of everything that changes, gathering huge amounts of data that are transformed aesthetically into a physical copy of the city, made up of cables, lights and sensors that represent shifts in environmental parameters measured numerically. The obsessive focus is on the observation of environmental data by gathering measurement on temperature, light, atmospheric pressure, noise and the sounds of the city outside the museum. Gathering digital data on the environment has become an art, and art has become a data set rather than a collection of molecules. The short-list of the Jury reflects the reappearing artistic interpretation of the modern urban landscape as system, where the solid element is replaced by the message, theinformation and the database, a real, but dematerialized city.

Le parole OPEN YOUR CITY sono la traccia tematica che ha guidato la mostra di Share Prize. Il premio ha come obiettivo scoprire, promuovere e sostenere le arti in epoca digitale. La selezione delle opere finaliste della mostra è dedicata agli artisti che interpretano l’innovazione come linguaggio di espressione artistica, in ogni modo e forma. Una giuria internazionale composta da Simona Lodi, Carlo Ratti, Bruce Sterling e Mirjam Struppek hanno scelto gli artisti in base all’aderenza al tema e al valore estetico dell’opera.

Dichiarazione della giuria

Quale è il ruolo dell’arte, in questo momento di transizione sociale verso la città del futuro? In quest’ottica gli artisti hanno interpretato il tema Open Your City, sviscerando le parole chiave. La short-list della giuria riflette l’interpretazione del riapparire artistico del paesaggio urbano moderno come sistema, dove l’elemento solido è sostituito dal messaggio, dalle informazioni e dai database, una città reale ma smaterializzata.

Capacities: Real Time Complex – Connected Cities dell’artista inglese Stanza dedica la sua installazione alla complessità della vita in determinato ambiente. Ogni ambiente è sottoposto a cambiamenti continui che sono monitorati in tempo reale. I cambiamenti portano continua tensione e stressano il concetto di linearità ed evidenziano le emergenze che compaiono. In questo caso l’organismo è la città e non il singolo cittadino ma l’intero complesso urbano, tracciandone il profilo come sistema multiforme. L’installazione è lo specchio in real-time di ciò che si modifica, raccogliendo grosse quantità di dati trasformati esteticamente in una copia della città ma fatta di cavi, luci e sensori che esprimono il passaggio degli elementi ambientali raccolti in forma numerica. L’attenzione insistente è osservare i dati ambientali raccogliendo la temperatura, la luce, la pressione atmosferica, il rumore, e il suono della città fuori dal museo. Raccogliere elementi numerici che riguardano l’ambiente è diventata un’arte e l’arte e’ diventata un insieme di dati piuttosto che un insieme di molecole.

http://www.stanza.co.uk/capacities/index.html

 

 

Art that explores questions raised by modern society – about privacy, surveillance culture….

September 23rd, 2012

STANZA’s art explores questions raised by modern society – about privacy, surveillance culture, and who owns the data that is regularly collected about all of us – often using modern technologies to create his pieces. Since he first started exhibiting his works in 1984, STANZA has strived to create cutting edge art that deals with current issues. In the process he has won several impressive awards, including an AHRC arts fellowship, and has seen his work featured in over 50 different exhibitions globally.

Ahead of a installation of one of his works “Capacities” in Ghent, Belgium in September, Solomon Radley met with him, in front on a computer monitor at his studio in South London, to talk in depth about what he does over coffee.

Hey, how’s it going? Would you begin by telling me a bit about what you do?

STANZA: The things that I’m interested in are ‘surveillance space’, which is the idea of the city as having become a panopticon – this idea that we’re in a prison and we can be observed at all times, from all perspectives, all at once, and particularly in real time.

I use various technologies to do that, like CCTV and wireless sensor networks. Over the years, firstly I’ve developed a strong understanding of what these technologies can do in terms of learning about them, but also I’m having to develop for them, so I’ve learned how to develop hardware and software. You may think I’m a technologist – I see myself as a creative technologist, and I also see that artists are engineers, so they have to understand the technologies that they use, and the mediums that they use in order to get output.

To bring that into perspective, we can look at some artworks…

Sure thing. Would you expand on your thought that the city is a sort of prison?

STANZA: Urban Generation is a piece I did in relation to this idea of the city being a panopticon. Let’s say, in modernist terms, an artist would go out and collect assets – he might use a recording device or a camera – it would be a still, linear asset, and it would never change. It’s possible to actually conceive of the city as a moving physical entity, moving forward in time all the time. How is it possible to use new technologies to actually gain a representation of this, and use it in a culturally meaningful way?

Urban Generation attempts to imagine the world from everyone else’s perspective all at once. If I’m giving a talk, what I try and do is – to illustrate the conceptual shift – I say: “I’d like you to close your eyes, and I’d like you to imagine yourself in a place in London. I’m going to do the same and I’m going to take a single mental snapshot, and I’d like you all in the room to take your single snapshot. Now, I’d like you to imagine the view of the people sitting next to you to your left and to your right, so you have three images multiplied together. There’s 300 people in the room; I’d like you to merge all of these 300 images together. And now not like a film, (because if we used a film we’d be recording the same images) what I’d like you to do is to move these images forward in real time.”

This is the idea I’m trying to capture with this piece of work.

A lot of your work is concerned with the question of who owns the information that is regularly collected about people, and with re-claiming that information. Tell me about this idea.

STANZA: I make artworks that arise from my research into these themes – the themes being ‘control space’ and ‘surveillance space’ and issues with privacy. What I’m doing, which is sort of new ground, is that I’m hacking access to a network and re-appropriating the data and information, and I’m re-contextualizing to give it a wider meaning. I want to show that you can do something positive with this data.

Other works where I’m interested in the control and ownership of data include this website called GenoMixer, where I fully sequenced my blood. In a sense this looks like artist self-portraiture, but I was interested in thedomain space – the public domain space – that’s inside our bodies.

We have this huge line of code – 3.3 billion letters – and it basically has an economic value. The proposal here is to IPO (Initial Public Offering) the project on the stock market, and to give everyone a share of the derivable intellectual royalties. For example, if somebody else wanted to investigate your DNA in a medical program they’d have to pay you. If some other company discovered the cancer gene because you were on the police forensic database you could say “No it’s copyrighted – it’s on the GenoMixer database”.

It just so happens that I also made a series of self-portraits with them…

One of the most obvious types of information that is commonly collected about the general public is video images gathered by CCTV, and this is something you often look at. What are your thoughts about CCTV?

STANZA: Let’s look at “Urban Generation – trying to imagine the world from everyone else’s perspective, all at once“. What we’ve got here is: each square on this four-by-four grid is making calls to over 100 cameras in London in real time. This is a parallel reality, using live network data to re-appropriate it over the network and use it for something else. For example, this could be used as an extension on landscape painting.

Why this has become quite interesting, and the reason I mention these modernist aspects that are fixed, is that this work is never the same. You could look at it even now, on a different monitor, and it would be different: It’s not the Mona Lisa – where every time you look at the work you experience the same thing – there’s an added problem here.

Another interesting question here is: Is what we’re looking at the artwork? On July 7th in 2005 they switched this entire network off because of the terrorist attacks. Well my system still worked, it’s just that the output – which is what connects a viewer to the system – is shifted.

This [Public Domain Responsive Architecture Facade] is the same concept using CCTV, observing the whole of the city but making it transparent. Why would you want to make your movements open and transparent? Why would you want to let CCTV be seen by everybody? This is a building with its outer surfaces displaying images that are embedded in the city – all the stuff on the outside of the building is shifting in terms of the real time properties of that city. In a sense, you (as the observed individual) become part of the building and part of the city, and this opens up the idea of transparent architecture and transparent space.

Public Domain is another work along the same theme, where I gave CCTV cameras away to members of the public, to open up this idea of CCTV networks. People sometimes say that they’ve got nothing to hide, and to nothing to fear…I think that’s a problematic statement. I’m not coming down on a particular side of the fence here, but it seems to me that we’ve opened Pandora’s box, and there’s a whole series of legislative and ethical issues that aren’t being addressed.

Hopefully what I’m doing in these artworks is to draw attention to the fact that there’s a whole series of potential problems that we’re walking in to.

You also play with collected data, which you use to create interactive works or installations where real-time changes are caused by environmental factors…

STANZA: We’ve already looked at my CCTV system. There’s another one, which uses wireless sensors/wireless nodes. You scatter them across the city, and they talk to each other in a network grid.

This research started in 2004 as a result of an AHRC grant that I was awarded, and I was trying to find a system I could use as open source hardware and software, that would monitor the whole city space. I’ve scattered these sensors around a city to generate visualisations and sonifications in various cities. For my first project [Sensity] they were output onto a visual globe.

So, now what I was interested in doing is looking at this real time data, that’s now everywhere, and seeing if I could do something else with it – if I could make art with it.

Equally, in Sonicity I deliberately put a whole load of speakers on the floor and connected them all up to make it look like a map, and somewhere else (in another part of the world) that data is being collected from my network and being spat out onto the internet via an XML stream. In arty terms, maybe I’m “painting with data” – the data has become the medium. With this data I’m painting a sonification of the real time landscape.

The second thing I was trying to think about, as part of this thinking process, was all the stuff that’s being collected about us – not just my data, but tax data and medical records – which could be used because of the way it changes and shifts from one thing to the next to power other events:

With CapacitiesI made…let’s call it a sculpture…a sculpture of computer parts that looks like a city, and would be powered by events changing somewhere else in real time. In this version of Capacities, all the lights and fans, and all the parts that change, do so because of other things happening in the world in real time.

The reason I’m trying to do that is that there seem to be other values that people are missing in terms of the things that are happening to us, and the world, in real time. We’ve become bodies residing in a ‘data space’. Everything around us is the data space and by default we interact with it – even small movements displace millions of atoms.

I conceive of this post-modern world in which movements are just moving a series of 0s and 1s. I can measure the 0s and 1s that I’m displacing by moving around. This interactive process is embedded in the work by default.

Visitors to a Gallery… is quite an important work, in that it opens up the gallery space as an artwork. For example, these two people that are pictured aren’t actually in this room – they’re in another room in another part of the gallery, so they’re embedded in the artwork that you’re viewing. Everybody in the architectural space becomes part of the artwork, and this happens in real time – it’s not recorded, and it’s not a film. So I utilize the technology in the space (the CCTV system).

Secondly, what’s happening here is that there are a series of proximity sensors that affect this as an algorithm – as you walk around this space all of these images oscillate/vibrate slightly.

So when you’re in the room, viewing this artwork, you’re at the same time generating an artwork for someone else in another room?

STANZA: And you’re in the work you’re viewing yourself, through your interaction with the sensors.

That’s also happening in Seeing Through Walls, where there are little cameras and monitors, so you become embedded in the same artwork as it’s being broadcast live, or in this piece where you can see through to people on the other side of the wall.

I was actually in a Greek club where they had something like that – the mirrors in the toilet let you see yourself, but also the women doing their makeup in the adjacent toilets…

STANZA: Ha! No wonder their ecomony’s gone down the pan…

Moving on from that, my work splits into this idea of using real time networks and investigating different ways of interacting with public space.

Here’s a strange project called The Binary Graffiti Club, where I got a load of people to dress up in hoodies with 0s and 1s on their backs, and they go round the city making binary graffiti – painting little coded messages onto the city.

Anything in particular?

STANZA: Well…no. I don’t want to be too specific about this, because… Well here’s a piece going back to the DNA project (the open source bit). If you sit in the gallery for…this has been online for seven years: If it was exhibited in a gallery you could get my open source DNA, and you could go off and replicate me, but it changes a letter once every second so you’d have to sit there for 104 years with a pen and paper. The same is true of the binary graffiti club – if you want to know what the message is, you have to sit there and transcribe it and translate it.

One letter from STANZA’s DNA code – the letters are shown in order, one per second for the 104 year project

This led from another piece of work – A City of Bits – as well as this performance that was laid down in the form of this sushi: I invited 12 people, after the disciples, and asked them to come and eat this coded sushi message. So, this is a coded message that they eat, and then they all put their own message back into a jar which I’ve now destroyed. I’ve transcribed those messages here…

You have a performance coming up in Texas soon – tell me a bit about what you’ll be doing.

STANZA: In Soundcities, using a recording device, I’ve been to all these different cities, recording sounds which are attached to Google Maps, and you can visit lots of cities in the world…

The key to this is the database; you can see the sounds, arranged in different categories, and you can create a performance by picking a selection of them and building up rhythms. This is what I do with my performances, except I have the same thing on a couple of machines, and I might mix it with sounds from churches, etc. It’s basically a live world tour of city sounds as music: the machines are connected to a mixing desk, images are coming from the website projects.

During the eight years I’ve been doing these performances, they’ve been heavily focused on the sounds of cities, the database live and soundmaps.

So this database can be used in performances, but the key here is that the database is open source, and other people can contribute to this community of sounds. There’s lots of other projects that have come from this, but the most important bit is this. This XML feed shows the sound, and its longitude/latitude, and although this is just a line of code it basically means that anyone else can use this to write their own apps.

What I’m doing that’s unique here is: it’s like an artist of the past allowing someone into their studio to work in parallel with them.

www.stanza.co.uk

The Internet of Things. PART III The Third Space. Connecting Data Spaces To Make Artworks.

June 11th, 2012

The Internet of Things. PART  III The Third Space.

Future Avatar Cities.

I proposed in a recent interview for The Internet of Things Council  (http://tinyurl.com/3trotzq) that future cities will be merged into real time connected up data cities. Not just one space, but a connection of networks and of real time information flows. The results created will lead to mashed-up cities and real time performative city experiences.

Stanza Generative software map maker.

I am now interested in how this shared dataspace can overlap,  creating a new space in between, which only two nodes share, a future avatar city.  The aim here is to give tangible form to this new space, the space where the cities overlap, presenting an alternative urban virtual environment. In the prototype the audience sees the data  and will be able to mix data from cities; they can even mix the data to make music with it.  This novel approach allows a critical reflection on the real time city.

The Third Space speculates that social sensing might lead to a new social space and eventually a new business enterprises which can be exploited.  What is possible is that significant breakthroughs in knowledge about the shared data experience can be achieved through user-based interfaces online, on mobiles , media facades and other platform (multi distrubution will spawn micro businness.

In the last few years several systems have been deployed to monitor city environments. Mostly they exist as isolated networks.  My plan is to ask them to link up. This takes a step towards the “City of Bits” that Bill Mitchell talks about.

Future cities will be merged into real time connected up data cities.  A connection of networks of real time information flows as demonstrated in trials for Stanza’s earlier AHRC funded project (Sensity). The Third Space works impacts on how data flows overlap in live streams, demonstrating the possibilities for novel artistic experiences and technical outputs, including sonifications, visualizations, and sculptural objects.

Dewayne Hendricks says: “We’ve connected more people, but we haven’t connected more things yet;  we’re getting a convergence now, but what’s missing are the people that are advocates of this intelligent device stuff.”  The Third Space joins the dots and offers this vision thereby creating the potential for maximum impact.

The Third Space creates outputs that directly show how networks can be connected and data harvested for creative uses. In the last few years several cities have started to use motes sensors to create data spaces as test beds including Newcastle and soon Santander. The Third Space also impacts on Connected Environments, Smart Places, Smart Cities, Wireless Sensor Networks.

By using the standardized XML data streams that were developed  previously  to make the data / city available in the public domain. The aim is to improve this availability and connect up multiple data spaces (cities) to show the impact on our experience of the city, and thus create an ecosystem prototype. The data environment becomes a virtual data map of the real events.  What is demonstrated is that the collected data can be re-made reconstituted to be real again enabling physical objects to interpret the virtualised city data. The analogue is made digital and the digital can be re-formed into a variety of output devices.

One has to experiment with the technology and understand how to get under the bonnet, and then new  outcomes will shed light on how data flows overlap in live streams demonstrating what are the possibilities for novel artistic experiences and outputs as well as new business models which will benefit from sonifications, visualizations, and sculptural objects; as well as apps, and feedback into other networks and intergrated systems.

Image: Stanza. These are Our Children.

Problems inside the Emergent City

Can we use new technologies to imagine a world where we are liberated and empowered, where finally all of the technology becomes more than gimmick and starts to actually work for us or are these technologies going to control up, separate us, divide us, create more borders. Will the securitization of city space create digital borders that monitor our movement and charge us for our own micro movements inside the system?

The result will be used to test the main hypothysis which is I believe there is a new social space that exists in between these independent networks. What happens when future cities are merged into real time connected up data cities. The results created will lead mashed up cities and real time performative city experiences.  For example how can we  merge collected data from various real time cities to visualise this new space, the space where the cities overlap. This could allude to a new architectural and urban virtual space.

This might also allow for a greater community of interpreters and beneficiaries to see, and to come to their own understandings arising from this data about our socially-networked environment.  (as the data in this projects is open source via XML.

Will the securitization of city space create digital borders that monitor our movement and charge us for our own micro movements inside the system? Imagine walking out the door, and knowing every single action, movement, sound, micro movement, pulse, and thread of information is being tracked, monitored, stored, analyzed, interpreted and logged.

The conceptual ambition of the project is to answer this question.

The Mother Of Big Brother

Can we use new technologies to imagine a world where we are liberated and empowered, where finally all of the technology becomes more than gimmick and starts to actually work for us or are these technologies going to control up, separate us, divide us, create more borders. The world we will live in seems to be a much bigger brother than the Orwellian vision, it’s the mother of big brother.

Social Spaces.

Underpinning this research, are a whole series of potential problems about observation, surveillance, and the ethics of the control space.  By researching current surveillance systems, tracking software, and pattern recognition software one can  come to an understanding about the social and ethical implications of such technologies both in artworks as well as public domain space and to speculate where these technologies could lead us in the future.

By building my own art systems and tools using custom made software, I try to raise further questions about the ethics of the control space and surveillance space

Alongside this technology research I have focused on the aesthetic development of the systems outputs by investigating different ways to represent the data and different ways to question the meaning of the system.  

Cultural Contexts.

How we understand and value information is of great importance. It seems reasonable to suggest that visual metaphors might simplify our understanding of data in space. I want to make my work eternally current. It will allow a real time multiple perspective of an identified space.

Stanza 2010

 

 

 

 

The Internet Of Things. Part 1(the art of gathering environmental data.)

June 11th, 2012

stanza-049Selected projects I have made since 2004 that demonstrate the art of gathering environmental data. The Internet Of Things. These work came into being because of a Nesta Dreamtime award and AHRC creative fellowship grant. Most of these artworks where made 2004 – 2012.

 

Sensity

http://www.stanza.co.uk/sensity/index.html

Sensity artworks are made from the data that is collected across the urban and environment infrastructure. The sensors interpret the micro-data of the interactive city. The output from the sensors display the “emotional” state of the city online in real time and the information is also used to create offline installations and sculptural artworks.

Datacities

http://www.soundcities.com/data.php

These datamaps show live environmental data from a 40 motes wireless sensor network that can be deployed anywhere. They monitor light, temperature, humidity, noise.

 

Intelligent Sheep: Baa Ram Ewe…to your clan be true.

http://www.stanza.co.uk/sheep/index.html

This is an interactive sound performance and concert. This artwork uses local environmental data collected using ad hoc wireless networked devices for environmental monitoring, which are attached to the sheep. In this case the dozen sheep collect and send data about the environment, and respond to the space as a collective as they move about.

Faith

http://www.stanza.co.uk/ingodwetrust/index.html

Faith is an artwork made using data harvested from sensors scattered over the cathedral. The sensors respond to changes in the environment they are located in this case Liverpool Catherdral. The data is turned into a sound stream, this sound stream represents Gods presence and you can listen to this sounds, the sound of God.

 

House

http://www.stanza.co.uk/house/index.html

House is a dynamic public sculpture viewable over the internet. House describes the space, a real Victorian terraced house, in this case, that the artist lives in. House is a live embodiment of change and renewal. In “House”, the private interior has been made public. Sensor data unfolds and discloses the inherent properties of the space, creating an online artwork.

Tree

http://www.stanza.co.uk/tree/index.html

A tree that makes music and sings a song about the environment. The first version of Tree used 40 networked multi sensors. The sensors are hidden all over a tree, broadcasting sensor data ( light, temperature, humidity, noise, and GPS location). The data is translated to music. The results produce a singing networked tree which can be heard in the park.

 

A world of new possibilities.

http://www.stanza.co.uk/possibilities/index.html

The landscape becomes virtual, dynamic, and encoded. The artwork discloses the underlying data that we see that is changing all the time in front of us.

 

Gallery

http://www.stanza.co.uk/gallery/index.html

The gallery becomes the artwork formed by the emergent real time data in the space. The gallery laid bare as a work of art. Gallery proposes that the data is art. The art is a real time flow of the things around us that allow our senses to invoke understanding. The gallery space becomes the art described by the shifts in light, temperature and noises in the space over time.

data data data

http://www.stanza.co.uk/data/index.html

“data data data”, is a live real time data visualisation made using sensors which are scattered over the building. The sensors respond to changes in gallery space ie the environment of the building. The changing data is turned into this visual event and projected outside across the city, in this case Liverpool. This artwork is networked, its real time, and its takes data from a wireless sensor network that is placed in the real space.
Façade

http://www.stanza.co.uk/facade/index.html

The facade is a live dynamic interface, an artwork that changes its behaviour as a result of the changing condition in the environment. This works by sensing the city and the environment to make art. The results become representations of the real time spaces and environment of Trondheim in Norway. The output from the sensors display the real time environmental and emotional state of the city online in real time and the information will be used on the façade and online interface to control it.
Capacities

http://www.stanza.co.uk/capacities/index.html

In Capacities the whole gallery space becomes one large artwork made from real time city information and data. The aesthetic and feel of the space looks like an electronic city.  The city is made of units, grids, repetition, building blocks. In the gallery city called ‘Capacities’ the leads, the wires, and cables are incorporated into the artwork to look like a city map.  Capacities looks “designed” like a piece of urban design, a city surveyed and controlled.  The whole space becomes a map to wander through.

 

Sonicity

http://www.stanza.co.uk/sonicity/index.html

This artwork is a responsive installation, a sonification of the real space and environment. The sounds you hear are the sounds of the changing environment, ie the changes of noise, light, temperature of the space is turned into a real time sound stream using dozens of wireless sensors presented as an installation on 170 speakers. My system monitors the space (the building) and the environment (the city) and captures live real time data (light , temperature, noise, humidity, position) to create an ambient sonification, an acoustic responsive environment, literally the sound of the micro incidents of change that occur over time.

www.stanza.co.uk

stanza@sublime.net

 

The Art of Environmental Data By Stanza

June 11th, 2012

The Art of Environmental Data.

An interview with Stanza via email for Jack Stewart studying at the Manchester School of Architecture operating under the umbrella of the Remap Unit, which focus upon mapping and data collection to expose the latent and invisible qualities of the city.

Stanza Sensors On Google Maps

Stanza places sensors On Google maps 2006.

The Art of Environmental Data.

1. The Sensity Projects aim to record data in the emerging city environment; how do you feel the use of such data could be useful for architects and designers in informing their designs?

This is an area seems to be springing into the mainstream, led I believe by the notion of “the internet of things” and the business spin off potential. It is surprising that urban designers and architects haven’t embraced this work more quickly or recognised that at the very least there is opportunity here to integrate the space around us using these novel ad hoc sensor technologies. Some engineering firms have and are looking into this like ARUP and obviously wireless sensing tech is now big business.  I have been trying for some time to get on board with an architect with the idea of doing something like Façade (see below)

Sensity and its sister projects have gone along way to not only illuminating possible uses but and to demonstrate multiple scenarios.

Anyway to be specific, other scenarios that could be questioned from the data sets include, noise monitoring across spatial environments and how this is affected by a real time input. More specifically focused sensors could give data that can lead to conclusions about what types of material are best suited for a site, or even a “consciousness” of the space, as well as all the bio chemical possibilities.

Most of these types of systems themselves can also be “building management systems”. The data can not only be adapted for security and monitoring the social welfare of the space can be nurtured; it could feed back into a system designed to self regulate depending on the variables and properties imposed.

Stanza House Data Visualisation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. How do you feel that Sensity and Soundcities re-innovate and enrich the urban systems we currently operate in?

This has to be taken as two questions because of the underlying structure and objectives of these two separate projects.

Sensity for sure allows us to see or at least make more tangible the invisible in the world around us. Sensity supports this premise by producing new information that is changing real time. This information is being also affected by out default interactions with the space and the environment. The Sensity project allows us to speculate on the city itself as a living breathing space with its own DNA that evolves and mutates. This metaphorical approach allows a freedom to speculate that the spaces we design are in fact emergent entities and that various properties and variables can be monitored; ie the stresses of the space and “emotional” conditions are what make a space enjoyable habitable or even dangerous. Sensity can up pick on this.

Soundcities, because it works in a different way addresses issues that I describe as being more of the modernist age. However as noise and sound involve field recording (we are also presenting the art of environmental monitoring). However now we are taking about the sound we literally hear as we walk out of the door. Not just as noise (data) or as noise pollution but also as an appreciation of sound and how this not only affects the space but is the space.

The noise is the city, the noise is the music, the city is the orchestra and we are just conductors whose interactive actions compose this music as we walk around. What Soundcities does is create an open source archive, a resource where better speculative questions could be addressed. The unique XML feed system also allows other to make user interactions both software and hardware that can control the sounds or to make spatialisation and sonfications of the environment based on the analogue recorded sounds.

Image (c) Stanza Datacity art. Data from across the city.

3. Why do you feel the recording of emergent or changing data of the city is important?

It was my research as an artist that has led me here from fixed object and linear works about the city and urban design (i.e. paintings drawing) I then made interactive systems and closed generative systems.

I concluded that the next model was to adopt and create a real time system. My feeling for this is primarily based on my inquiry into how to work with “time” itself. These works are not archived. In Sensity the data is not recording; the works, the experience, ever exists in the present. It’s that moment that I am interested in making more of. I want to somehow get inside the idea of present time.

This present tense we all share with one another in a very equal way does not discriminate. The present second as it shifts to the next is the moment that I want to understand. So the question is slightly skewed as there is no “recording” in the Sensity process (I have yet to build in an archival set of data results as I haven’t been funded to take this further and this would be most useful i.e. to study a space over a longer time.

This is why the research is needed. To answer the why question?

4. Soundcities takes similar concepts from your previous work, but provides a platform for anybody with access to the net to add to. Do you feel this has richer content and why?

The soundcities content is different. Instead of being data sets and numbers that relate to the environment in real time the soundcities takes snapshots of the environment as sound that is recorded then placed online. The interesting thing now is the project is opened up for others allowing a re mixing or mash up. It allows these “others” to do with the “material” other things for example concerts and art installations. Using the XML feed other applications are created ie phone apps merged with you PS position or visualisation of noise across a space…all sorts of things are possible.

5. If architects were to inform their designs through data from Soundcities do you think there would be a social exclusion issue for those without access to the internet and why?

I think the sensors in Sensity project would be better for this sort of thing. However the issue becomes about the network, borders of control, and issues to do with sharing and protection. In my view it will get really interesting when dozens of spaces and buildings all link up in virtual space.  To create what I term ”The Third Space”. (This was a funding proposal rejected by the AHRC and The tech Strategy Board.

I suggest there are over lapping areas of the city which can only be found online ie merged cities online Madrid, London Paris can overlap. I will go intio  more details.  below.

6.  How would you consider to further develop your projects

I have many ideas for this but no money as I am not funded.

However is a summary  of The Third Space. The project seeks via practise based research to create novel artistic interfaces using environmental data.  Outputs from the research include sonifications, visualizations, and sculptural objects.

This work focused on data as a medium for artistic creativity and how meaningful and well as poetic experiences of space / environments may result from quantitative analysis of the results. The aim is to speculate on new ways of comparing, conceptualizing and then visualizing environmental data and real space.

I  proposed in a recent interview for The Internet of Things Council  (http://tinyurl.com/3trotzq) that future cities will be merged into real time connected up data cities. Not just one space, but a connection of networks and of real time information flows. I am now interested in developing deeper research over three years to question how this shared dataspace can overlap,  creating a new space in between, which multiple nodes can share.

The methodology involves collecting data from sensor networks, disseminating the computer techniques developed, and making artistic prototypes. The aim here is to give tangible form to this new space, the space where the cities overlap, presenting an alternative urban virtual environment and creating new artworks and installations.

Within “The Third Space”, the initial focus is on the data sets of noise, pollution, light, and temperature. In other words the sensors will initially monitor urban environments.

To achieve this I will connect up multiple spaces (cities / environments) using motes sensors and this will be published online via XML feeds. These new online spaces will in turn lead to newly created online bespoke interfaces. I then aim to demonstrate that there is a new and unique online avatar where the data overlaps creating the Third Space. I will speculate how the flow of the data can be set to affect the behaviour of the output environment.

I would network at least three cities spaces in real time for this project using custom sensing technology. Initial outputs will include a musical system / interface powered by the merged data to create a real time sonification of the Third Space

 

7. What would you say are the challenges we face in further developing and integrating data collection like Sensity into the urban realm?

The questions I  pursue to answer this include:-

– How can this information be meaningfully represented to new audiences?

– How can this data be displayed (visualisation and sonifications) in new and original ways and do the results create new ways of understanding the environment?

– What are wider social implications of opening up real time networks; who owns this space and what are the ethical implications of real time information systems for artworks?

Underpinning this work, are a whole series of potential problems about observation, surveillance, and the ethics of the control space. I research current surveillance systems and wireless sensor networks to  come to an understanding about the social and ethical implications of such technologies both in artworks as well as public domain space.

By building my own art systems and tools, (which support my research questions); I also aim to raise further questions about the ethics of the control space and surveillance culture.

 

Syncronicity By Stanza

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8. How do you feel that artworks such as your own could shape a ‘future city’?

Future cities will be merged into real time connected up data cities. I believe there is a new social space that exists in between independent virtual data networks, a new avatar space. The Third Space and the work I have done before have becomes  a series of  artistic prototypes that offer new insights into networked spaces.

9. All of your projects are open source; what is your reasoning for this decision?

I don’t like the term open source or but my work endeavours to collapse the borders created by networks so there is a free flow and exchange through the system both for input and outputs of ideas and latterly resources which I call assets (the data and the information.

10. How do you feel projects such as your own pave the way for empowering and liberating the city dweller?

The aim in my work is to develop a more socially engaged practise, to embed a deeper context based on critical reflection regarding notions of privacy, surveillance space, control space and meaning of newly created  real time spaces.

11. Your data visualizations are stunning; what do you feel the importance is for translating the data your gather into something people can visualize and understand?

The objectives is both to create new artistic experiences questioning the notion of realtime environments while using of data as a medium and delivering creative outputs.

And also create work that reflects upon issues of privacy, and surveillance space.

I think I would get sidetracked here but maybe I could just say the objective is to create a new way of seeing and the experiencing the space/ environment. work ls around us.

By doing it this was not only do we see how we affect the systems but and most important the use ie users (us the people) are by default embedded in the interactive and responsive process. In other words we become part of the work.

I am interested in making systems where by default the users are the work, the artwork. Its a feedback  loop, every actions we have has a reaction, every reaction causes change, this change happens over time and its reflected back in front of us either as the changing world we experience and now as art.

12.  How do you feel your projects impact the ownership of the spaces they are deployed in?

This question needs an essay in its own right and goes off in another direction that’s interested me for some time. I made called Public Domain where I tackled this question head on. Public Domain uses live CCTV across the city to extend space and invoke impressions of transparency with architectural space. . Public Domain is an experimental approach to ownership in information in networks. Instead of the linear tree like system with the one central viewer, all the cameras and views (resulting data) are given away and all the views can be seen online by all. The data is mixed into an online collage, using specially created software viewable by all.

http://www.stanza.co.uk/public_domain_outside/index.html

 

http://www.stanza.co.uk/publicdomain/index.html

Another work “Visitors to a Gallery- referential self, embedded” uses the live CCTV system inside an art gallery to create a responsive mediated architecture. This artwork is responsive to the body in the data space. The visitors act as an intervention in the gallery space and become embedded in the artwork.  The idea of using the information inside the space is also to make the space transparent and extend the gallery space outwards. The gallery space is also extended virtually onto the internet as the feeds from the installations images are broadcast live. The visitors to the gallery thus become embedded in the artwork and this permeates the larger system of data and information over the internet.

Stanza 2012

 

 

 

 

 


 

In Search of a Digital Masterpiece (or Two): Stanza

May 31st, 2012

 

Abstract.

In Search of a Digital Masterpiece (or Two): Stanza

By Maria Chatzichristodoulou [aka Maria X]

This article (5000  PUBLISHED BY MIT PRESS) discusses Stanza’s artistic practice in relation to the ever-contested, severely loaded and perpetually evasive concept of the ‘masterpiece’ to ask: Are there any digital artworks that can be said to merit the title of a masterpiece? (Paul, 2011). And, can Stanza’s works be described as such?

Stanza is an internationally recognized, award winning digital artist, pioneer in his use of technology in the arts, who boasts a vast and diverse body of work that spans a range of practices, techniques and media: from prints, video and net art works, to interactive installations, responsive environments, generative art and complex digital ecosystems. The thematic strands, aesthetics, and affective impact of Stanza’s work have remained remarkably consistent over the years, dealing with issues such as urbanism, solitude and surveillance culture. His practice, nonetheless, has undergone significant shifts, moving from the creation of linear, object-based works such as prints and videos, to large-scale compositions of (a)live, open-ended, permeable, and unpredictable systems.

On my way out of the Thursday Club event I encountered digital artist Stanza an artist whose practice I have been enticed to follow since the late 1990s, when he contributed generative artworks of the Amorphoscapes series and the net art piece The Central City to the Medi@terra art and technology festival I was co-directing at the time (Athens, Greece). Stanza is an internationally recognized, award winning digital artist, pioneer in his use of technology in the arts, who boasts a vast and diverse body of work that spans a range of practices, techniques and media: from prints, video and net art works, to interactive installations, responsive environments, generative art and complex digital ecosystems. He started creating and presenting work in the mid-1980s with pieces such as Artitextures, a multi-monitor video art installation (originally made as video wallpaper) presented at the V2_ Institute in Den Bosch, Holland (1986); and the Conundrum video, shot in the grey cemented mazes of South London and heavily aesthetisized in postproduction (1987). Both works use city images and sounds to reflect upon fractured urbanity, communicating a sense of cultural discontinuity and emotional isolation within a post-industrial urban landscape. Though the thematic strands, aesthetics, and affective impact of Stanza’s work have remained remarkably consistent over the years, dealing with issues such as urbanism, solitude and surveillance culture, his practice has undergone significant shifts: he has moved from creating linear, object-based works such as prints and videos, to (often grand-scale) compositions of (a)live, open-ended, permeable, and unpredictable systems characterized by a state of flux.

full essay over at MIT  press

www.stanza.co.uk/about/essays/STANZA_LEA_03.pdf

 

 

 

Artworks using data and the artists DNA sequence. By Stanza

February 22nd, 2012

Genomixer DNA artworks By Stanza

Artworks using the atists DNA

stanza_dna_lifeforms

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Genomixer ….a database of dna code. A completely new online experience.

A series of online artworks inspired by the human genome sequence and developed from dna profile which are sequenced from the artists blood. The online artworks are investigations into genetic codes mapped and re assembled online. The artwork series enables a cross reference all the code on the genome sequence allowing you to intermix or breed your own variable of me; you can look at the new mix of chromosomes in real time; on line.

 

To make these works my dna was sampled to make metaphases, g-banding and full profiles of chromosomes. Samples of my dna currently resides in my freezer ready for cloning. Works are enabled by dna code extracted from my blood. The sounds and images of code make audio visual self portrait versions.

Artworks using the atists DNA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

stanza dna metaphase painting 2002

stanza dna metaphase painting 2002

It seems likely with the advent of self dna tests the emergence of this type of DNA test will be prolific. This data can be recorded into the genomixer database and saved. That is, each independent user will have there own personal online audio visual experience based on there unique genetic code and becuase they have the option to save it this means they can also see and listen to other users results. In other words this is a giant open source audio visual labyrinth and database. The system uses a generative audio system that can play interactive non linear audio over the net. The sounds are mapped to the genetic codes. Genomixer is a complete audio visual online generative system. Code representing code generated by code made from blood.

Genomixer ….a database of dna code.

Stanza Data Artwork called Sonicity exhibited at 25th Stuttgarter Filmwinter

February 12th, 2012

Stanza  Data Artwork called Sonicity exhibited at 25th Stuttgarter Filmwinter

Smart cities and real data

Stanza Smart cities and real data

Sonicity Installation is exhbited in Germnay  for Stuttgarter Filmwinter Sound Installation, Great Britain 2011.

“Sonicity” is a responsive installation, a sonification of the real space and environment. This artwork focuses on the real time space and the experience of the gallery visitor as they interact with the space, using data gathered from these new technologies. My system monitors the space (the building) and the environment (the city) and captures live real time data (light, temperature, noise, humidity, position) to create an ambient sonification, an acoustic responsive environment, literally the sound of the micro incidents of change that occur over time. This artwork explores new ways of thinking about interaction within public space and how this affects the socialization of space. The project uses environmental monitoring technologies and security based technologies, to question audience experiences of the event and space and gather data inside the space. The project also focuses on the micro-incidents of change, the vibrations and sounds of the gallery using wireless sensor based technologies.

Stanza Sonicity Artwork

Stanza Sonicity Artwork

The sounds you hear are the sounds of the changing environment, i.e. the changes of noise, light, temperature of the space is turned into a real time sound stream using dozens of wireless sensors presented as an installation on 170 speakers.

Soundinstallation, Großbritannien 2011

“Sonicity” ist eine reaktionsfähige Installation, ein Hörbarmachen von realem Raum und realem Umfeld. Die Klänge, die man hört, sind die einer sich verändernden Umwelt, das heißt Veränderungen von Geräuschen, Licht und Temperatur werden mithilfe dutzender kabelloser Sensoren in einen Echtzeit-Soundstream umgewandelt und als Installation aus 170 Lautsprechern präsentiert.

Die Arbeit konzentriert sich auf den Echtzeit-Raum und die Erlebnisse der Besucher wenn sie mit dem Raum interagieren. Dabei werden Daten, die durch diese neuen Technologien gesammelt wurden, verwendet. Mein System überwacht den Raum (das Gebäude) und die Umwelt (die Stadt) und erfasst live die Echtzeit-Daten (Licht, Temperatur, Geräusche, Luftfeuchtigkeit, Position) um die Umgebung in Form von Tönen abzubilden, eine auf Akustik reagierende Umgebung, buchstäblich der Sound der Mikro-Veränderungen, die sich im Lauf der Zeit ereignen. Das Kunstwerk untersucht neue Denkansätze über Interaktion im öffentlichen Raum und wie sich diese auf die Sozialisation des Raums auswirkt.

Das Projekt nutzt Umweltüberwachungstechnologie und Sicherheitstechnik, um die Besuchererlebnisse im Raum zu hinterfragen, wobei Daten im Raum gesammelt werden. Das Projekt beleuchtet auch die Mikro-Veränderungen, die Vibrationen und Geräusche der Ausstellungsräume mit drahtloser, sensorenbasierter Technik.

Parallel Realities. Time based surveillance artworks

June 12th, 2011

Parallel Realities. Made using custom made software by UK artist Stanza  that take images from live feeds often live news feeds and live feeds.

Stanza. Los Angeles CCTV Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Underpinning these artworks and research, are a whole series of potential problems about observation, surveillance, and the ethics of the control space.  Imagine walking out the door, and knowing every single action, movement, sound, micro movement, pulse, and thread of information is being tracked, monitored, stored, analyzed, interpreted and logged.

These artworks are made from small unit blocks, simplified then re built,  re-cored re-formed into an understanding that can re-communicate the complexity of the larger system.  From a series  media visualisations 2004  – 2006  made using custom made software that take images from live feeds often live news feeds and live CCTV feeds.

Timescapes. Made using custom made software by UK artist Stanza  that take images from live feeds often live news feeds and live CCTV feeds.

Artworks by Stanza about Surveillance art and privacy.

June 9th, 2011

Artworks by Stanza that in some way deal with surveillance and privacy.

Over the last ten years I have a made of  twenty artworks and large installations that survey my interest in privacy , control space, and surveillance. This also  overlap with my interest in cities, environmental monitoring and the building as display space. It seems to make a nice online exhibition. ( see below)

Main artworks using CCTV surveillance and notion of control space.

stanza_art_installation

Urban Generation; trying to imagine the world from everyone elses perspective, all at once 2002. Multiple CCTV cameras are accessed randomly in real time to make an urban tapestry. What you see is an evolving, generative artwork. These images are from taken London, and they happen as you see them, in real time. The installation versions of this work can be presented in art galleries using projectors or plasma displays. http://www.stanza.co.uk/urban_tapestry/index.html

Baa Ram Ewe…to your clan be true. 2008 This artwork performance focuses on local environmental concerns using ad hoc wireless networked devices for environmental monitoring. In this case the dozen sheep collect and send data about the environment, and respond to the space as a collective as they move about. The sheep monitor the environment in real time, generate sound, and send data to a server (online or offline) where this data is interpreted  visualized and sonified in situ using custom made software. http://www.stanza.co.uk/sheep/index.html

Public  Domain 2010. This project investigates the real time gallery space and the experience of the gallery visitor as they interact with artworks and with each other. The artwork explores new ways of thinking about interaction within public space using data gathered from new technologies. The visitors are “performers” whose movements can be tracked.  The patterns, movement, and exchanges of data in the real space, can be measured and interpreted as an emergent social space and used to make new artworks.  http://www.stanza.co.uk/public_domain_outside/index.html

“Visitors to a Gallery- referential self, embedded”. 2008 The gallery surveillance system embeds the visitors to the gallery inside the artwork. CCTV in public spaces. This artwork uses the live CCTV system inside an art gallery or any public space to create a responsive mediated architecture. Custom made electronics and sonar sensors are placed to create an installation in the gallery space. Visitors to the main upper gallery control the CCTV feeds by their own movement in the space. The piece becomes a semi performative controlled system. The proximity to the main ultrasound sensors affects the aesthetic of the image. http://www.stanza.co.uk/cctv_web/index.html

Public Domain 2005. Is an artwork using live CCTV cameras given away to members of the public. The project places real time CCTV feeds online, creating a randomised narrative of the city landscape and its population. The images are grabbed and placed online and mixed in a unique and custom built software surveillance suite. This first version used ten cameras in Nottingham in 2005. http://www.stanza.co.uk/publicdomain/index.html

Sonicity. 2010. This artwork explores new ways of thinking about interaction within public space and how this affects the socialization of space. The project uses environmental monitoring technologies and security based technologies, to question audiences experiences of the event and space and gather data inside the space. The project also focuses on the micro-incidents of change, the vibrations and sounds of the gallery using wireless sensor based technologies. http://www.stanza.co.uk/sonicity/index.html

Capacities. 2010. This project leverages the real time gallery space and the experience of the gallery visitor, using data gathered using these new technologies. The objective is to explore new ways of thinking about interaction within public space and how this affects the socialization of space. The project uses environmental monitoring technologies and security based technologies, to question audiences experiences of the event and space and gather data inside the space. http://www.stanza.co.uk/capacities/index.html

Public Domain: III. 2010. Continuing the series of investigations into the uses of CCTV to extend space and invoke impressions of transparency with architectural space. Here to extend the architecture of the building and extend it into the city. The artwork includes the performative aspect of those being watched as can be displayed inside the work. http://www.stanza.co.uk/CCTV_publicdomain/index.html

Stanza Artwork Live CCTYV

Stanza Artwork Live CCTYV

DATA DATA DATA  II. 2010 Made from the data that is collected from the sensors (usually across the city) or inside a building or a gallery. I have two networks of sensors which collect this data, all this is then published online. This is an art project that gives information about the fabric of our cities. By embedding the sensors like this we can re-engage with the urban fabric.  http://www.stanza.co.uk/data/index.html

“We have nothing to hide only to lose”. 2010 A performative piece using CCTV systems. The CCTV follows the artist around the building in the depths of the night and the result is projected outside in the city. http://www.stanza.co.uk/CCTV_performance/index.html

Stars of CCTV.  2007

These are the Stars of CCTV.  These images represent a portrait of England since the start of the CCTV imaging revolution.This image represented the start of the CCTV revolution. Since then we have seen CCTV cameras placed all over the United Kingdom for our “safety”, without any real debate about the ethic and accountability of surveillance in public domain space.

http://www.stanza.co.uk/stars_of_cctv/index.html

YOU ARE MY SUBJECTS. 2005. This online networked artwork uses live real time data from a camera in NYC . What you are seeing on the screen is happening in New York as you see it in real time.  Someone is always watching you in a world of total surveillance culture. This artwork deals with the aesthetics of CCTV and the voyeuristic notion of who controls the data and who has access to the data. Millions of hours of CCTV are watched in private in closed off networks. “You Are My Subjects”, turns CCTV images into artworks. http://www.stanza.co.uk/i_spy/index.htm

The World Is Watching, The World is Waiting. 2005 This artwork is networked, its real time, and its taking images in the present and representing them to you online as a media visualisation of the whole world. The software system uses over five hundred cameras are take the information and arranges the present time in a continuous flow.http://www.stanza.co.uk/watching_world/index.html

Stanza: CCTV  Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Stanza: CCTV Media Visualisation 2005. Large print On Canvas.

Timescapes 2004 -5.

Artworks from live media visualisations. Most of these are now large original artworks on canvas available for sale and exhibition. These images or mediascape are made from my software system that gathers images live from any webcam in the world. At your descretion it cuts them up them up to make time shift mediated artworks.

Artworks by Stanza

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.stanza.co.uk/timescapes_web/Public_Domain_Event_Space/index.html

http://www.stanza.co.uk/timescraper/index.html

‘america is bleeding’ – 2005 The computer manipulates the real time experiences and life of NYC as it unfolds. The city and its population are all actors in this real time play. Keywords: Visualisation, data, mediascape, net art, real time, CCTV, http://www.stanza.co.uk/new_york_stories/index.html

 

Syncronicity By Stanza

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Urban Rhythms. Searching for the soul of the city. 2004 A networked real time experience of a city. The artwork collects cctv feeds from around city in real time. These real time images are fed into a software system where a series of specialized channels rework these images. The channels are always on, and always changing, a constant view of world cities changing and evolving around the clock. http://www.stanza.co.uk/spain_cctv/index.html

“Global…Never the same again always different….forever.”2004. A 3d web sculpture being transformed in real time with live data from around the world. This is being updated from webcams around the globe in real time. ‘Never the same again always different….Forever’, uses CCTV and web cams which offer readily available sources of continuous visual data from our environment and world cities. This work turns the notion of surveillance upside down, since in this work we are all watching everybody and opens up a question about the legality of the imagery. http://www.stanza.co.uk/global/index.htm

‘Blue Skies’, 2005 Uses CCTV cameras on the roof of the Watershed Media Centre in Bristol England. This is an online surveillance system using three cameras to monitor the sky above. Blue skies acts as a metaphor using new networked technologies that are generally used to observe people in society that might be engaged in criminal activity. http://www.stanza.co.uk/blue_skies/index.html

“The World Turned Upside Down”: 2007 This artwork was online from 24.9.2007 until the leaves fell in my garden on 12.12.2007.After that only documentation will exist, which is below.  This artwork is available as an installation for exhibitions.  http://www.stanza.co.uk/cam/trees_web/index.html

Seeing Through Walls. 2007. This installation using CCTV to open up the space to  play tricks and to  see through walls Commission idea for the Olympics 2012. This installation uses CCTV to open up the space to play tricks and to see through walls. http://www.stanza.co.uk/fake/index.html

“Monument” 2007. Robotic sculpture and CCTV systems to replace Eros in Picadilly London.The CCTV captured get replayed onto all the giant screens all over London. The robotic arms move and the CCTV cameras come down and say hello. They capture your image and relay the image to banks of screens across the city and online. http://www.stanza.co.uk/monumnent/index.html

DATA DATA DATA by Stanza 2008. This artwork is networked, its real time, and its takes data from a wireless sensor network that is placed in the real space. The old world of modernism was a world of fluids and gases atoms and molecules. This world is now a world of numbers. As we move about our interactivity affects the environment and this change is captured by a wireless sensor network. Real time artwork.  Technical note this can work in a gallery ( online over the internet) to represent the space (gallery or city) as numbers. http://www.stanza.co.uk/datacity/index.html

Soul 2004 -06. Soul is an artwork created to represent the ‘soul’ of the city that captures live data and visualizes the results as a piece of sculpture in a constantly evolving data sculpture. It is presented on a unique display technology, this is a 3 meter globe. Soul is a site specific work placed in urban space.The results of the installation are also viewable to a global audience as an online networked generative experience. Real time images are fed into a software system where a series of specialized channels rework these images to create unique visuals. The channels are always on, and always changing, a constant view evolving around the clock. The data is never the same, it is always changing. http://www.stanza.co.uk/soul_globe/index.html

“This England: A Green and Pleasant Land”, 2005. These pastoral landscapes and seascapes are real time paintings. Instead of CCTV watching our movement in urban space these cameras point out to the landscape or towards the sea. Typically this subject matter was the focus of the ‘Old Masters’. The digital landscape is fused with an ever changing present. http://www.stanza.co.uk/thisengland/index.html

Alpha to Omega 2006. Gathering images live from any webcam in the world that happens to be pointed or focused at the weather. The images are updating from around the globe in real time. http://www.stanza.co.uk/weather_another/index.html

Syncronicity 2008. This work developed out of my research fellowship at goldsmiths college.This is a live visualisation of a hand drawn city. Dozens of hand drawings are being walk on by small robots. The real space made as a visualisation. A special camera system, makes these digital images in the gallery space. Prototype was tested in Plymouth arts centre 2008. http://www.stanza.co.uk/syncronicity/index.html

 

FREEZONE 2005 Is a unique global company offering short holidays.  All bio chips, ID cards, GPS, will be neutralized at the door for the duration of the stay. Obviously “they” will know you are in Feezone, but what you do is up to you. FREEZONE The global “mother of big brother” will create a giant sensor net. The virtual world of databases will be connected via our electronic gadgetry. The giant sensor net of embedded chips, CCTV, bio tech and the internet will all be available to all via Earth pro version 10.2.  http://www.stanza.co.uk/ideasrus/freezone.html

Artworks by Stanza

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Publicity. 2004 Publicity is an artwork about the Surveillance of public domain space utilzing the CCTV systems in place and manipulating the CCTV feeds. A series of codes manipulates the CCTV of the building and created a new relationship with public domain space. This artworks questions who owns the data and who is watching us in these spaces. Most buildings have CCTV and they use it to observe the people inside the space, ie the public. http://www.stanza.co.uk/publicity/index.html

Stanza asks:- Can we use new technologies to imagine a world where we are liberated and empowered…

April 4th, 2011

RvK: Stanza, you were among the first internet artists. What would you say is the most important philosophical step (if we can think in terms of ‘progress’, or ‘going somewhere’) that you have taken in this period?

“In the last twenty years there has been a significant shift in audio visual artists’ practise from linear expressions, to interactive (user controlled) mediations, to generative (evolving) and then network-based (real time) systems. Online, this space  also expands the whole notion of the artist’s studio.  My focus is on the things that change, the flow, the data that describes our experience of the city as space. Data from all sides in systems that can be mediated by all, with varying visualizations communicated over the internet and represented onto different display systems.

There are many  theoretical aspects to my work, but primarily I am a practice-based artist……in other words I make stuff.

My work has covered experiments in these areas and traced a shift in practise from modernist approaches of asset gathering (linear construction) to arrangements of datasets in fixed lists or databases (interactivity) to new approaches of mining information across networks in real time.( generative and real time systems)……culling data off CCTV networks, making visualizations of cities from my wireless sensor networks.”

Stanza Live City Data

RvK: How do feel about the current actualizations of the ‘in between’ space that you felt, saw or heard coming some time ago?

“I believe there is a new social space that exists in between these independent networks. Future cities will be merged into real time connected up data cities.  A connection of networks of real time information flows. The results created will lead mashed up cities and real time performative city experiences.  This conclusion although led from my earlier trails using wireless sensors in a project called Sensity.

I am interested in how this shared data space can overlap creating a new space in between which only two nodes or spaces share. For example in one of my artistic experiments I have  merged collected data from various real time cities to visualise this new space, the space where the cities overlap and which allude to a new architectural and urban virtual space. Uses of such information might allow rich new interpretative visualisations about the way our world is built, used, and designed.

The resulting artworks represent the real time conditions of the city.  Works like “Sensity”, create real time interpretations of social spaces that inform the world (online), and hopefully create new meaningful experiences allowing critical reflection on the real time city and the social political undercurrent embedded in the search for the real time city.

This might also allow for a greater community of interpreters and beneficiaries to see, and to come to their own understandings arising from this data about our socially-networked environment.  (as the data in these projects is open via XML)

Underpinning these artworks and research, are a whole series of potential problems about observation, surveillance, and the ethics of the control space.  Imagine walking out the door, and knowing every single action, movement, sound, micro movement, pulse, and thread of information is being tracked, monitored, stored, analyzed, interpreted and logged.

The world we will live in seems to be a much bigger brother than the Orwellian vision, it’s the mother of big brother.

Can we use new technologies to imagine a world where we are liberated and empowered, where finally all of the technology becomes more than gimmick and starts to actually work for us or are these technologies going to control up, separate us, divide us, create more borders. Will the securitization of city space create digital borders that monitor our movement and charge us for our own micro movements inside the system?”

RvK: The data is the medium, you state. Can you explain this a little bit?

“Just  that… the data is the medium of the age….”

RVK: Can you find connections to the FB generation? Do you want to?

“It has a useful API as do all these new big sites; however there are restrictions entering the domains and boundaries of others especially when they  try to cross over and get monitised.”

RvK: The key  (or one of the keys) is  the granularity of input for these ‘smart’ systems. How do you see this?

“Yes, small unit blocks, simplified then re built , re-cored re-formed into an understanding that can re-communicate the complexity of the larger system. Strip the city down and re- configure it as a real-time visualization and plug it into other cities.”.

RvK: Your work is filled with wonder? Do you feel that this wonder is facilitated somehow in what is now termed Internet of Things?

“I have tried to encompass this “wonder” about real time connectivity and networked space  in my  latest three works, they are about the “internet of things”, but equally  they  are about real  time experiences of the environment and the spaces that change around us.”

Works by stanza
Façade.

I have been comissoned to make a responsive architectural façade. The facade is a live dynamic interface, an artwork that changes its behavior as a result of the changing condition in the environment. This works by sensing the city and the environment to make art. The results become representations of the real time spaces and environment of Trondheim in Norway. The environmental data is collected across the urban and environment infrastructure to make the artwork; using custom made sensors in the building and around the city. (30 custom environmental sensors units measure, light, noise, sound, humidity, and temperature). This data is turned into a online real time visualization of the space. The output from the sensors display the real time environmental and emotional state of the city online in real time and the information will be used on the façade and online interface to control it.
‘Capacities’ by Stanza.

I am planning a much larger version of Capacities and I am looking for an exhibition for it. In Capacities the whole gallery space becomes one large artwork made from real time city information and data. The aesthetic and feel of the space looks like an electronic city.  The city is made of units, grids, repetition, building blocks. In the gallery city called ‘Capacities’ the leads, the wires, and cables are incorporated into the artwork to look like a city map.’ Capacities’ looks “designed” like a piece of urban design, a city surveyed and controlled.  The whole space becomes a map to wander through. ??Sonicity by Stanza

Sonicity

I am working on the next version of Sonicity for a space in South London.  This artwork is a responsive installation, a sonification of the real space and environment. The sounds you hear are the sounds of the changing environment, ie the changes of noise, light, temperature of the space is turned into a real time sound stream using dozens of wireless sensors presented as an installation on 170 speakers.

This artwork focuses on the real time space and the experience of the gallery visitor as they interact with the space, using data gathered from these new technologies. My system monitors the space (the building) and the environment (the city) and captures live real time data (light , temperature, noise, humidity, position) to create an ambient sonification, an acoustic responsive environment, literally the sound of the micro incidents of change that occur over time.

Stanza was interviewed byRob van Kranenburg from The Internet Of Things.eu

Stanza data data data

Capacities gets award in Digital Turku.

December 7th, 2010

Capacities was given an award in Digital Turku in Finland for 2011. This is more great news the whole installation will be on show for two  months some time next year.

stanza artist capacities

Image: Stanza Capacities.2010. Responsive data artwork.

About Capacities:  The real world is made virtual and the virtual is made real again and exposed in the process.

The whole gallery space becomes one large artwork made from real time city information and data. The aesthetic and feel of the space looks like an electronic city.  The city is made of units, grids, repetition , building blocks. In the gallery city called ‘Capacities’ the leads, the wires,and cables are incorporated into the artwork to look like a city map.’ Capacities’ looks “designed” like a piece of urban design, a city surveyed and controlled.

The whole space becomes a map to wander through.

http://www.stanza.co.uk/capacities/index.html

Another view:

stanza artist capacities

Image: Stanza 2010. Artwork Capacities.